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Old 10-04-2010, 10:02 AM
 
15,960 posts, read 8,728,175 times
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Question A second Earth, great, now what are we gonna do with it?

Recently there was a story in the news saying astronomers have found a planet that is pretty similar to earth and probably ready for life (if it's not there already).
So I was wondering, say we find such a planet and a way of transportation that is fast enough to make it there within a reasonable time period (with current technology it would take several decades to get to the new planet mentioned above), what should we really take there to get nature going?
If evolution has not set in yet, would it make sense to start evolution again and at which level should we start?
On Earth there are complete food chains, so one can hardly take only select species and hope that it will all fall in place somehow. Should we take the most primitive organisms which we can still find today and which were probably the origin of our own ancestors? The advantage would be that we could send them now in an unmanned spaceship and by the time we have developed the technology to go there ourselves (hundreds of years from now I suppose), a kind of evolution might already have set in.
Since evolution is terribly slow, are there evolution boosters so to speak?
Should we stop evolution at a certain stage? I mean, we don't need the dinosaurs again, do we?
Would evolution lead this way in the first place or might it bring about completely different creatures than here on Earth?

Last edited by Neuling; 10-04-2010 at 10:20 AM..
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Old 10-04-2010, 10:46 AM
 
6,040 posts, read 5,666,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Recently there was a story in the news saying astronomers have found a planet that is pretty similar to earth and probably ready for life (if it's not there already).
So I was wondering, say we find such a planet and a way of transportation that is fast enough to make it there within a reasonable time period (with current technology it would take several decades to get to the new planet mentioned above), what should we really take there to get nature going?
If evolution has not set in yet, would it make sense to start evolution again and at which level should we start?
On Earth there are complete food chains, so one can hardly take only select species and hope that it will all fall in place somehow. Should we take the most primitive organisms which we can still find today and which were probably the origin of our own ancestors? The advantage would be that we could send them now in an unmanned spaceship and by the time we have developed the technology to go there ourselves (hundreds of years from now I suppose), a kind of evolution might already have set in.
Since evolution is terribly slow, are there evolution boosters so to speak?
Should we stop evolution at a certain stage? I mean, we don't need the dinosaurs again, do we?
Would evolution lead this way in the first place or might it bring about completely different creatures than here on Earth?
Well, we wouldn't even have to actively place any life forms there; simply by setting foot on such a planet, we'd spread biological life forms without even trying. Whether they'd survive or not, good question.

But it's an interesting concept to ponder. Certainly things like plants would have to survive and thrive before anything else could be brought in.
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Old 10-04-2010, 10:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mercury Cougar View Post
Well, we wouldn't even have to actively place any life forms there; simply by setting foot on such a planet, we'd spread biological life forms without even trying. Whether they'd survive or not, good question.

But it's an interesting concept to ponder. Certainly things like plants would have to survive and thrive before anything else could be brought in.
Yes, plants are key, without them there probably won't even be an atmosphere. So what do plants need apart from water and starlight? Bacteria, worms and such creatures. Insects to spread pollen...
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Old 10-04-2010, 12:28 PM
Status: "no sound ever comes from the gates of Eden" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
9,909 posts, read 7,555,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Recently there was a story in the news saying astronomers have found a planet that is pretty similar to earth and probably ready for life (if it's not there already).
So I was wondering, say we find such a planet and a way of transportation that is fast enough to make it there within a reasonable time period (with current technology it would take several decades to get to the new planet mentioned above), what should we really take there to get nature going?
I always wondered about when scientists see these objects how far are they from us? Sure it might be a large size planet thousands of light years away. But maybe, the planet is no bigger than a soccer ball and is only a few hundred miles from here. If it is small and fairly close I vote we just kick it further away and not have to face any of these moral dilemmas that we'd likely screw up anyways.
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Old 10-06-2010, 09:52 PM
 
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stop before politicians are created
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Old 10-07-2010, 08:15 AM
 
Location: ɐpɐʌǝu 'sɐƃǝʌ sɐl
13,764 posts, read 9,411,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
(with current technology it would take several decades to get to the new planet mentioned above)
About 50,000 of them.
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Old 10-07-2010, 08:26 AM
 
15,960 posts, read 8,728,175 times
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Originally Posted by swagger View Post
About 50,000 of them.
Really? Where did you read that?
Either way, it takes much too long... If humans continue to multiply and destroy the Earth, we should invest a lot more time and energy into the development of new ways of space travel because we will have to leave Earth sooner or later, some of us anyway
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