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Old 02-06-2012, 03:50 PM
 
Location: The Island of Misfit Toys
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
The problem with having a singular universe is that it inevitably leads to space-time paradoxes. For example, in a singular universe one could never travel back in time and kill their grandfather before their father was born.
Oh, I'm so sorry. You must be terribly disappointed.
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Old 02-06-2012, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I'd be inclined to word that in reverse. What we are is relative to the Universe.
Suppose there were other universes, assuming all universes have dark matter. Then we would have universes clashing each other, with the dark matter doing the pushing.
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Old 02-06-2012, 09:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
Suppose there were other universes, assuming all universes have dark matter. Then we would have universes clashing each other, with the dark matter doing the pushing.
I don't know if dark matter would necessarily do any pushing, but dark energy might play a part in that though. Dark energy is suspected to be causing space to expand, in effect, making the space of the universe grow larger. Dark matter seems to be what compresses regular matter together, such as helping hold galaxies and network of filiments together throughout the universe. As space continues expanding, the filiments (which are at a much larger scale) stretch and become thinner. The same thing might happen to galaxies as well, but because they are much smaller in scale than the filiments, stretching wouldn't as noticable.

That's not to say that dark matter couldn't have a role in a multiverse scenario as you described. If all universes contain dark matter, then the massive gravitational attraction could cause universes to clump together, and probably bump or collide with each other. One possibility that could involve dsrk matter, if what has been coined "Dark Flow" is a massive clump of dark matter with enough gravitational attraction to cause galaxies to be pulled toward it. If there are other universes, and a clump of dark matter is large enough, and any other universes are close enough, then it could be gravitationally attracted to either cause an effect of Dar Flow, or pull the universes toward each other, maybe collide, maybe merge. Imagine if a universe composed of antimatter collided with our universe. It might cause a really Big Bang.

The discovery of "bruises" in four different areas in the CMB has been suggested by Stephen Feeney and gang that such 'bumping' may have taken place before. Like Roger Penrose's "rings", we may have to wait and see if the Planck spacecraft can confirm the existence, as to whether either the rings and/or bruises are clear and distinct, or whether they're just illusions of static in the CMB, kind of like getting a better look at the "Face on Mars". So far, there's been no confirmation from Planck. See link below.

The problem is that if there are other universes, we'd have no idea what they would be like. Some might be somewhat similar to ours, but some might be very different with exotic forces, different dimensions, or even completely empty like an expanding bubble of empty space in a hypothesized Bullk.

Astronomers Find First Evidence Of Other Universes - Technology Review
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Old 02-06-2012, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Good post, Night. I did accidentally say "dark matter" instead of "dark energy." :>
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Old 02-07-2012, 11:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
Good post, Night. I did accidentally say "dark matter" instead of "dark energy." :>
It's easy to accidently get terms mixed up. The term "Dark" seems to be a popular but overused trend. I think it was physicist Lawrence Krauss who said the term "Dark Energy" is just a generic term to simply say that we have no real idea what it is or why it causes space to expand and accelerate. Once it can be better identified and understood, it can be categorized with an actual identifiable label, maybe end up being named after someone.
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:52 PM
 
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Universe didn't come from nothing. It's impossible for humans and their peanut sized brains to understand the universe. Because we deal with birth and death and that's how were brought into this life. It's certainly does not mean the universe works the same way. The Big Bang theory vilolates the first law of thermodynamics dynamics. That nothing is created nor destroyed. There is no evidence for the Big Bang that's why it's only a theory. in fact all the evidence points against the Big Bang theory. Methuselah a star in our galaxy is older than the universe itself, by at least 3 billion years. Lmao how is that possible???? Anyone????
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Old 01-25-2015, 10:48 PM
 
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Afraid you're a bit out of date. Current information puts the age at roughly the same age as the universe within the error of the data. Oh, and "only a theory" while emotionally appealing, is a misunderstanding of the word "theory."
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Greater NYC, USA
2,760 posts, read 2,820,758 times
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My response to every space know it all.

When we know about the ocean as much as we know about space now, we believed in folklore and magic sea creatures.

If you think about though, anything that is bound by the dimension of time can not "always existed". It has to have a starting point in time and an ending point. Unless your saying that the object does not exist in 4 dimensional universe.

We have photographs made by telescopes and me try to make sense of em.

The OP even brought up religion.

If we could find out how time passes at the epee-center of the universe, and if we could find out what is there, we might have something to talk about.

Big Bang: The pictures on the internet show Universe relatively flat. If it was created by a big bang, things would be going in all directions and not a flat round formation. Can we even theorize on the laws of physics that make it this flat ?

Additionally, telescopes are picking changing distances between solar systems. Solar systems move apart, and sometimes really fast, maybe even faster then the speed of light.

SO far, we made a huge metal pipe, hid some people inside and put em into space. They orbited the earth and even stepped on the moon.

We need more access to space. As far as space exploration and space theories are concerned we at infant stages.
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Old 01-26-2015, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,446 posts, read 11,239,900 times
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We aren't even close to understanding the complexities and paradoxes of the universe - heck, watch a person's face the first time they draw a continuous line on a Möbius strip and you explain how it only has one side.
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Old 01-28-2015, 01:14 AM
 
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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Well, suppose a universe can be born at anytime in any place, there could be a new big bang taking p[lace right now wiping out what we are looking at in the night skies and we wouldn't know it! Its front could be rushing at us at the speed of light destroying everything in its path and be completely invisible until it wipes us out (which would make it too late to see anyway).

What I find curious is that when we look out into the universe we can see right back at the very first galaxies (and therefore stars) which formed soon after the hypothetical big bang. Our view is so totally distorted by time and the speed of light. Just big was the universe way back then, I wonder?
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