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Old 12-19-2011, 01:20 PM
 
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O.k. so the CMB or Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation that we can still detect on earth (firstly in 1964) is what tells us that there was a Big Bang event. However where i'm confused is that since that event happened some 13.7 billion years ago how then can we still detect it as shouldn't it have longed passed us and dispersed through out the entire known universe by now?
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Old 12-19-2011, 08:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
O.k. so the CMB or Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation that we can still detect on earth (firstly in 1964) is what tells us that there was a Big Bang event. However where i'm confused is that since that event happened some 13.7 billion years ago how then can we still detect it as shouldn't it have longed passed us and dispersed through out the entire known universe by now?
It has dispersed througout the universe. That is why we can detect it in any direction.
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Old 12-22-2011, 10:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
It has dispersed througout the universe. That is why we can detect it in any direction.
I just realised that it is microwaves and not gamma rays as to why it hadn't decayed in the last 13.7 billion years .
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Old 12-24-2011, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
O.k. so the CMB or Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation that we can still detect on earth (firstly in 1964) is what tells us that there was a Big Bang event. However where i'm confused is that since that event happened some 13.7 billion years ago how then can we still detect it as shouldn't it have longed passed us and dispersed through out the entire known universe by now?
Think of it like opening a hot oven in a cold kitchen. The heat from the oven dissipates through the entire room, heating it up. It will take a long time for the room to get back to the absolute original cold temperature. So far the temp has only gotten back down to 2.725 degrees K.
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Old 12-28-2011, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
169 posts, read 306,388 times
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
O.k. so the CMB or Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation that we can still detect on earth (firstly in 1964) is what tells us that there was a Big Bang event. However where i'm confused is that since that event happened some 13.7 billion years ago how then can we still detect it as shouldn't it have longed passed us and dispersed through out the entire known universe by now?
Keep in mind that the big bang happened everywhere in the universe since, at the time of the big bang, the universe was only a single point. The EM energy didn't really "disperse throughout the entire known universe", but rather it's source is the entire known universe.
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Old 12-28-2011, 04:35 PM
 
5,206 posts, read 8,210,851 times
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
O.k. so the CMB or Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation that we can still detect on earth (firstly in 1964) is what tells us that there was a Big Bang event. However where i'm confused is that since that event happened some 13.7 billion years ago how then can we still detect it as shouldn't it have longed passed us and dispersed through out the entire known universe by now?
In terms of thinking about the Big Band and the CMB, it's not that it's necessarily far off in the distant space of the universe. It's also far off in the distant past (Time). It's everywhere.

Below is a link that remarkably shows a nuclear detonation after only one millisecond, which is 1/1000 of a second. It looks really weird. The inflation of the Big Bang (the Inflationary Epoch) would have been profoundly faster. The difference is that an explosion like this is matter converted into energy. The Big Bang was energy converted into matter. It's very hard to visualize that, but I think it helps understand a littlle about the Big Bang. The Big Bang wasn't an explosion in time and space, it was the massive expansion of time and space of the universe itself, which provided the formation of matter. You can sort of get an idea that as the nuclear explosion (matter into energy) grows larger, the warped and twisted shapes inside the fireball also grow larger and change. During the Big Bang (energy into matter), similar changes took place and expanded, which is what we see in the speckled shapes of the CMB, which are areas that are warmer and areas that are cooler. It's not perfectly smooth. They began as quantum fluctuations. The heat generated at the instant of the Big Bang would have been perhaps 100 million trillion trillion degrees (maybe more). Within 3 minutes, it cooled to about 10 billion degrees. In 300,000 years it continued cooling to about 3000 degrees Celcius. And it's continued cooling down ever since.

To give a rough idea of just how fast the initial inflation was, the universe grew from zero time to about the size of the solar system within a millionth of a second. That's incredibly fast! It really boggles the mind.

What a nuclear detonation looks like after 1 millisecond | Geek.com

WMAP Inflation Theory

Stephen Hawking's Universe: Universes

ESA - Space Science - So, how did everything start?
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Old 01-01-2012, 11:35 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,041,369 times
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Originally Posted by MSUdom5 View Post
Keep in mind that the big bang happened everywhere in the universe since, at the time of the big bang, the universe was only a single point. The EM energy didn't really "disperse throughout the entire known universe", but rather it's source is the entire known universe.
I'll have to ponder that as that's interesting.
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