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Old 12-28-2011, 03:59 PM
 
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So I am an oceanographer by degree and have not been able to find an answer by bothering my friends in the chem department or on the internet.

Could the bias of certain organic mixtures to be primarily chiral one way (i.e. amino-acid L) on this planet be due to the original ratios favoring matter over antimatter left over from the Big Bang?
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Old 12-28-2011, 04:49 PM
 
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That question supposes that there WAS a Big Bang.
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Old 12-28-2011, 04:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
That question supposes that there WAS a Big Bang.
Well this is the SCIENCE forum. BBT is the most accepted SCIENTIFIC theory of the origin of the universe.

If you would like to debate the evidence supporting a singularity event that might be better suited to the religion and philosophy forum.
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Well this is the SCIENCE forum. BBT is the most accepted SCIENTIFIC theory of the origin of the universe.

If you would like to debate the evidence supporting a singularity event that might be better suited to the religion and philosophy forum.
Sorry to upset the apple cart. I'm not a linear thinker so I immediately began thinking of the many ways to answer your question.

I'm still gathering my thoughts to give you my answer now that I know the rules for answering it.
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
Sorry to upset the apple cart. I'm not a linear thinker so I immediately began thinking of the many ways to answer your question.

I'm still gathering my thoughts to give you my answer now that I know the rules for answering it.
Oh....I was unaware you were a cosmologist or chemist.
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Old 12-28-2011, 05:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Oh....I was unaware you were a cosmologist or chemist.
I am neither. But the question is interesting and your title grabbed my attention. I enjoy reading this forum and participate when something especially interests me.
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Old 12-28-2011, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
So I am an oceanographer by degree and have not been able to find an answer by bothering my friends in the chem department or on the internet.

Could the bias of certain organic mixtures to be primarily chiral one way (i.e. amino-acid L) on this planet be due to the original ratios favoring matter over antimatter left over from the Big Bang?
Quick answer? No. Symmetry within matter-antimatter is speculative. "This planet" is an Earth-centric bias. Bilateral symmetry is a fun concept, borne out of laziness in the gene pool. Would you suggest that the Big Bang and the spiral of Nautilus or Conch shells have a direct causal relationship?

How to express this???... I spin fibers into a thread. Does the breed of sheep determine whether I spin the thread with a right or left twist?
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Old 12-29-2011, 12:02 AM
 
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Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Quick answer? No. Symmetry within matter-antimatter is speculative. "This planet" is an Earth-centric bias. Bilateral symmetry is a fun concept, borne out of laziness in the gene pool. Would you suggest that the Big Bang and the spiral of Nautilus or Conch shells have a direct causal relationship?

How to express this???... I spin fibers into a thread. Does the breed of sheep determine whether I spin the thread with a right or left twist?
While your answer maybe correct I reject your reasoning.

If matter "wins" over antimatter due to its asymmetry, as seen by the CP violations, and chiral compounds are made of that matter. Why wouldn't that lack of symmetry be the root of the lack of a racemic nature of most biological compounds?

To hijack your analogy the sheep itself is already twisted before you can even begin to twist the thread.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
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Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
While your answer maybe correct I reject your reasoning.

If matter "wins" over antimatter due to its asymmetry, as seen by the CP violations, and chiral compounds are made of that matter. Why wouldn't that lack of symmetry be the root of the lack of a racemic nature of most biological compounds?

To hijack your analogy the sheep itself is already twisted before you can even begin to twist the thread.
Matter doesn't win over antimatter as they will both annihilate each other as you are more-than-likely aware of. One explanation for why matter seems to dominate, at least in [most] of our Universe is that there are pockets of matter and pockets of antimatter. The Big Bang had such an explosive force that it pushed matter and antimatter away from each other at such speeds that they were not able to interact with each out and cancel each other out, and as the Universe cooled--at least in our corner--matter was able to dominate since tremendous heat is required to produce the positrons necessary for antimatter. Now, such events as matter and antimatter interacting did, and do, happen throughout the Universe and create areas of nothing but photons, hence why matter and antimatter exist in pockets. It happens in our own atmosphere, the interaction that is--not the formation of pockets.

The Universe is so vast that pockets of each can exist for very long periods of time without encountering each other, but perhaps antimatter are more common at the edges of the Universe seeing as how the kinetic energy created by the expanding Universe may still be powerful enough to create the temperatures necessary for positrons to be emitted from decay and as the insides cool, matter becomes more prevalent?

It is also theorized that an antimatter galaxy would look the same as one comprised of matter.

But, are they really chiral particles? I thought the only difference between matter and antimatter was the charge on the e (negative for electron and positive for positron)?


As for the bias in chirality....If I remember from orgo...atoms can bond and form in many ways, although some have a preferred method based on the electromagnetic force and/or polarity of the particular atom[s]. So here you have many atoms bonding together to form different isomers, but the bias for a particular molecule to be favored lies in the fact that that one particular configuration just happens to be the one shape that fits what-ever other organic or inorganic molecules it needs to attach to or interact with. The rest in the racemic mixture continuously break and form bonds until they too find the right configuration to "move on".
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
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....I meant the polarity created when one or more atoms bond and/or the force created by a particular atom's electronegativity...not the polarity of an individual atom.
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