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Old 01-16-2012, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Texas
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I just got out of the theater tonight around five thirty or six or so. It was the brightest I've seen it in awhile. I was reading that it would be brighter than normal for the next few days due to sun activity. Venus doesn't have protection from an atmosphere like we do, so at certain times it is brighter.

I feel sorry for people who aren't as observant or as oblivious to such things.
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Old 01-17-2012, 12:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
I just got out of the theater tonight around five thirty or six or so. It was the brightest I've seen it in awhile. I was reading that it would be brighter than normal for the next few days due to sun activity. Venus doesn't have protection from an atmosphere like we do, so at certain times it is brighter.

I feel sorry for people who aren't as observant or as oblivious to such things.
Actually, Venus has a massive atmosophere. It is 250km thick, and has an average density of 9.2 MPa. The temperature at the surface averages 872°F. It is completely shrouded in very bright clouds, so much so that the surface can never been seen optically. Venus is very bright right now because of its phase (it has phases similar to the Moon).

Most of Venus' face is lit up relative to our orbit, and so it is very bright right now. If you look at it with a telescope right now, you will see a nearly full Venus (similar to a full Moon, but completely full). It is further away from us than when it is in a crescent phase, but because so much of the planet is lit up and viewable from Earth, it is very bright.

Phases of Venus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I hope this helps.
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Old 01-17-2012, 03:35 AM
 
Location: Sol System
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I managed to get a glimpse when I awoke yesterday evening. Right now , Saturn , Spica , and another object I can't recall at present are visible now , to the NE. I've pondered getting a good tele to take to work for use on breaks , but it would likely take all of my shift , at which point , I'd be unemployed.
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by etacarinae View Post
I managed to get a glimpse when I awoke yesterday evening. Right now , Saturn , Spica , and another object I can't recall at present are visible now , to the NE. I've pondered getting a good tele to take to work for use on breaks , but it would likely take all of my shift , at which point , I'd be unemployed.

If the third object to which you refer is low in the NE, that is probably Vega.
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Old 01-17-2012, 06:49 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Venus is the brightest star-like object in the sky when it's visible and not in the sun's glare.

BTW, exploration of Venus by Soviet and U.S. spacecraft have been onging since the early 1960s. The Soviets were the first and only nation to successfully land spacecraft and transmit data from the surface of the planet.
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Old 01-17-2012, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
Actually, Venus has a massive atmosophere. It is 250km thick, and has an average density of 9.2 MPa. The temperature at the surface averages 872°F. It is completely shrouded in very bright clouds, so much so that the surface can never been seen optically. Venus is very bright right now because of its phase (it has phases similar to the Moon).

Most of Venus' face is lit up relative to our orbit, and so it is very bright right now. If you look at it with a telescope right now, you will see a nearly full Venus (similar to a full Moon, but completely full). It is further away from us than when it is in a crescent phase, but because so much of the planet is lit up and viewable from Earth, it is very bright.

Phases of Venus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I hope this helps.
Yep, I actually made a mistake. How about that? Still, I was very stunned by the scene outside the theater. I wouldn't wait too late to take a look.
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Old 01-17-2012, 11:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
Yep, I actually made a mistake. How about that? Still, I was very stunned by the scene outside the theater. I wouldn't wait too late to take a look.
Right now is definitely a good time to observe it.
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
Right now is definitely a good time to observe it.
I take my android phone with Google Sky Map when I walk the dogs every evening after dinner so I can confirm what the different bright objects I see actually are. It's pretty impressive right now.
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Old 01-17-2012, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Venus is the brightest star-like object in the sky when it's visible and not in the sun's glare.

BTW, exploration of Venus by Soviet and U.S. spacecraft have been onging since the early 1960s. The Soviets were the first and only nation to successfully land spacecraft and transmit data from the surface of the planet.
Yeah, I remember Sputnik when I was a kid.
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Old 01-17-2012, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Sol System
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
If the third object to which you refer is low in the NE, that is probably Vega.

No , it was the moon. We have been rather busy at work , and I was multitasking several things at once. Shortly after saying this , I stepped out on lunch and saw them. Felt like slapping myself , I guess this is a precursor of mental mishaps to come. Thanks anyway , annually around this time , I look forward to seeing Vega , even in the metro with the ambient light pollution.
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