U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-02-2012, 11:51 PM
 
Location: in your dreams
10,890 posts, read 13,785,795 times
Reputation: 15365

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
The planet recently reached its greatest elongation and is currently moving closer to the earth relative to the sun, so it appears larger in th sky, and so also brighter. In June it will transit the sun (pass between the earth and the sun) and will be visible across the sun's surface. This will be the last transit of Venus for the next 100 years, so get out and watch it. Be sure not to look directly at the sun with the unfiltered eye as it will permanently damage your vision.

Can we watch it at night instead, lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-03-2012, 01:04 AM
 
3,426 posts, read 2,790,478 times
Reputation: 3318
Quote:
Originally Posted by D217 View Post
Can we watch it at night instead, lol

If you have x-ray vision and can see through the Earth, and are on the other side of the planet when the transit occurs, yes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2012, 01:58 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,120 posts, read 9,727,767 times
Reputation: 5942
I should go look. But I'll probably skive off, and just enjoy all the great photos that people will be taking of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2012, 03:34 PM
 
Location: in your dreams
10,890 posts, read 13,785,795 times
Reputation: 15365
Quote:
Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
If you have x-ray vision and can see through the Earth, and are on the other side of the planet when the transit occurs, yes.
Oh cool, thanks. lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2012, 11:44 PM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,262,012 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by D217 View Post
Can we watch it at night instead, lol
It will probably be streamed live on the internet, so of course.

Send me a link if ya find one
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 12:42 AM
 
3,426 posts, read 2,790,478 times
Reputation: 3318
Here is where the transit will and will not be visible:

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/tran/TOV2012-Fig01.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,496,555 times
Reputation: 6500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
I guess the planet has been hit by a sun storm?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
I see Venus is moving farther north, and Mars is a bit farther south? Or am I seeing things?
May starts with super bright Venus extraordinarily high in the western sky, but the planet falls out of view by month’s end, leaving us earthlings positioned for one of nature’s rarest of events: A transit of Venus across the sun on June 5th and 6th.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
Here is where the transit will and will not be visible:

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/tran/TOV2012-Fig01.pdf
Thanks. Good information.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,076,032 times
Reputation: 1632
This mottled landscape showing the impact crater Tycho is among the most violent-looking places on our moon. Astronomers didn't aim NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study Tycho, however. The image was taken in preparation to observe the transit of Venus across the sun's face on June 5-6.


Hubble cannot look at the sun directly, so astronomers are planning to point the telescope at the Earth's moon, using it as a mirror to capture reflected sunlight and isolate the small fraction of the light that passes through Venus's atmosphere. Imprinted on that small amount of light are the fingerprints of the planet's atmospheric makeup.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2012, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Stellenbosch, South Africa
126 posts, read 220,761 times
Reputation: 75
Why can it not look at the sun? Is it going to melt or something?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2012, 12:58 AM
 
16,308 posts, read 25,262,012 times
Reputation: 8302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roflguy2012 View Post
Why can it not look at the sun? Is it going to melt or something?
The Hubble CCD is designed to detect the faintest of light, light photons that have traveled billions and billions of light years.

And the CCD chip would surely melt if all the sunlight collected by a mirror 8 feet in diameter were focused on it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:59 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top