U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-19-2012, 02:14 AM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
10,416 posts, read 10,202,322 times
Reputation: 10357

Advertisements

I don't want to spend the money on a solar filter for my telescope, so I'd rather make a pinhole projector type deal to see this Sunday's eclipse. However, there are numerous designs for such things; can somebody with experience recommend the best one, provided it's to be built with various things found about a home, garage, and/or tool shed?

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2012, 05:42 AM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
10,416 posts, read 10,202,322 times
Reputation: 10357
Philip Plait recommends this:

Solar Eclipse: A How-To Guide for Viewing Eclipses | Exploratorium
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2012, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,530 posts, read 55,444,914 times
Reputation: 32227
meh. Stick a bit of tracing paper above the viewing lens of the telescope and look at the projected image there. If you are concerned about heating of the lenses, I guess you could stick aluminum foil in front of the front lens and poke holes in it.

Pinhole viewers are singularly unsatisfying. Even the use of a magnifying glass is better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2012, 05:22 PM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
10,416 posts, read 10,202,322 times
Reputation: 10357
I'm reluctant to use any sort of homemade solar filter on a telescope. A telescope can be ruined without a proper solar filter (one that fully covers the objective lens), and one should never point their telescope at the sun and let unfiltered sunlight travel through their telescope to project an image.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2012, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,530 posts, read 55,444,914 times
Reputation: 32227
<shrug> It'll probably go on my permanent record. If you have the Hale telescope, yeah. Forty bucks from Walmart, I'm not going to quiver in my shoes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2012, 09:41 PM
 
Location: outer space
484 posts, read 853,369 times
Reputation: 393
I was very lucky here that the marine layer blew in just in time and thick enough that I could view it directly.

Funny how everyone I look at now looks like pacman! j/k
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2012, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
878 posts, read 1,398,731 times
Reputation: 692
We missed it here in the PNW... we did get to see another not so strange phenomena however... we call it "overcast."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:56 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top