U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-30-2012, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,496,555 times
Reputation: 6500

Advertisements

The first asteroid, designated 2012 KP24, was first detected May 24, 2012, and passed within 32,000 miles of Earth on May 28th. It is approximately 68 feet across.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgJmrv2AETI

MPEC 2012-K52 : 2012 KP24

The second asteroid, designated 2012 KT42, was first detected May 28, 2012, and passed within 8,950 miles of Earth on May 29th. It is approximately 16 feet across.


2012-05-28 - SPACE.COM - ASTEROID 2012 KT42 - YouTube

MPEC 2012-K66 : 2012 KT42
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-30-2012, 08:28 AM
 
Location: 60630
12,412 posts, read 18,367,866 times
Reputation: 11880
good thing they kept on going. How much damage would they have done if they crashed on earth?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-30-2012, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,496,555 times
Reputation: 6500
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
good thing they kept on going. How much damage would they have done if they crashed on earth?
None. Both would have broken up in the atmosphere. Although, 2012 KP24 would have exploded loud enough in the atmosphere to be heard over a large area and fragments would have fallen to the ground, but no crater would have been formed.

The average interval between impacts of the size of 2012 KT42 is approximately once every 2.4 years.
The average interval between impacts of the size of 2012 KP24 is approximately once every 21.4 years.

Last edited by Glitch; 05-30-2012 at 08:47 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2012, 07:29 AM
 
Location: 60630
12,412 posts, read 18,367,866 times
Reputation: 11880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
None. Both would have broken up in the atmosphere. Although, 2012 KP24 would have exploded loud enough in the atmosphere to be heard over a large area and fragments would have fallen to the ground, but no crater would have been formed.

The average interval between impacts of the size of 2012 KT42 is approximately once every 2.4 years.
The average interval between impacts of the size of 2012 KP24 is approximately once every 21.4 years.

Thats good to here

The one that crashed down on earth and supposedly killed off the dinosaurs a " a few years ago", how large was that one, do you know?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2012, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,496,555 times
Reputation: 6500
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Thats good to here

The one that crashed down on earth and supposedly killed off the dinosaurs a " a few years ago", how large was that one, do you know?
The meteor that created the 110 mile wide Chicxulub crater 65 million years ago was approximately 6.2 miles in diameter. Slightly larger than the size of Mount Everest.

If you were 1,000 miles away from the impact the fireball would have been below the horizon, so there would have been no direct thermal radiation. However, 5.36 minutes after impact you would feel an earthquake of 9.9 magnitude. Eleven minutes after impact the ejecta would begin to arrive at your location. It would be a fine dust, approximately 30 thousandth of an inch in diameter, and it would continue to fall until it reached about 7.5" deep.

The air blast would arrive at your location one hour and twenty minutes after impact. The winds will be traveling at 220 mph with a sound intensity of 94 dB.

Multi-story wall-bearing buildings will collapse. Wood frame buildings will almost completely collapse. Glass windows will shatter. Up to 90 percent of trees blown down; remainder stripped of branches and leaves.

That would be a good time to be on the other side of the planet, away from the coast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,412 posts, read 18,367,866 times
Reputation: 11880
Yes, So this question might sound stupid. But if they discovered that a meteor of that size was in a collision course with earth would there be anything we could do about it? In the movies you see how they fly up there and blow the thing up with nuclear weapons so when it enter earths atmosphere it will be a whole lot smaller and the damage wont be as great. Is that purely a fictional thing or could that actually be done?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2012, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,496,555 times
Reputation: 6500
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Yes, So this question might sound stupid. But if they discovered that a meteor of that size was in a collision course with earth would there be anything we could do about it? In the movies you see how they fly up there and blow the thing up with nuclear weapons so when it enter earths atmosphere it will be a whole lot smaller and the damage wont be as great. Is that purely a fictional thing or could that actually be done?
It is not a stupid question. On the contrary, it is a very serious question asked by a great many people, including scientists. Hollywood not withstanding, our choices for dealing with an Earth-colliding asteroid will depend upon how far in advance we are able to locate the object. The more time before a potential impact, the more options are available.

In 1998 Congress established a Near Earth Object program under NASA, with the goal to identify all the Earth-crossing asteroids that are 1 km in diameter or larger. NASA is currently tracking 843 such objects as of May 2012, but only 152 are considered potentially hazardous asteroids.

There are three asteroids, that we are aware, that pose a high risk of impacting the Earth. It use to be four when the minor planet 99942 Apophis was thought to impact the Earth in 2029, but that has been reduced to zero risk. Apophis will get close enough to be visible with the naked eye, but it will not impact Earth in 2029 or in 2036.
  • NASA is also tracking the asteroid called (29075) 1950 DA, which is between 1.1 and 1.4 km in diameter. It has a 1 in 300 chance of impacting the Earth on March 16, 2880.
  • Then there is 2011 AG5. A small asteroid around 470 feet in diameter, which has a 1 in 500 chance of impacting the Earth on February 5, 2040.
  • Lastly, there is 2007 VK184. An even smaller asteroid around 440 feet in diameter, which has a 1 in 2,700 chance of impacting the Earth on May 30, 2048.
The last thing we want to do is pull a Hollywood and nuke one of these asteroids. All that will accomplish is breaking it apart so that instead of being hit by one large object, we are hit by thousands of smaller objects.



There are several better approaches:
  • Detonate a nuclear weapon near the asteroid, so the shock wave gives the asteroid a push;
  • Use a gravity tractor that parks near the asteroid and tugs it away from the Earth;
  • Use a powerful pulse laser to eject small bits of material off the asteroid, slowly changing its direction; or
  • Affix a solar sail to the asteroid and allow the solar winds to change its orbit over time.
I am certain there are other solutions we could use, and some work better than others, depending on the size of the asteroid and the amount of time before impact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2012, 05:20 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,412 posts, read 18,367,866 times
Reputation: 11880
Your solution's sounds good. I hope they( the scientists at NASA are aware of them also. Lol..

Thanks alot. It was real interesting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2012, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,098,557 times
Reputation: 24642
Buy a very large heavy duty umbrella like an old SAC rocket launch facility. Stock up on suplies and energy. Put your head between your knees and kiss your A** goodby.

FWIW - There are several meteor impact calculators available in the internet. Use one to set your self in the LA basin and postulate an impact in the Pacific Ocean of a 2 Km dia. meteor moving at 35 km/sec hitting 100 km offshore. Then try 1,000 km. Note the size of the wave hitting Long Beach.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-06-2012, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,076,032 times
Reputation: 1632
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Your solution's sounds good. I hope they( the scientists at NASA are aware of them also. Lol..

Thanks alot. It was real interesting.
Ever see "Space Cowboys"? (Clint Eastwood)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:55 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top