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Old 05-31-2012, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Cape Coma Florida
1,369 posts, read 1,897,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainroosty View Post
I know one thing.....I'm not goin'! .....ain't a dam thing to eat up there. Can you imagine?
Well yeah, but have you seen the pictures? Look at allllll that parking!
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,954 posts, read 21,817,639 times
Reputation: 25100
Being that Mars rules Aries, and I'm an Aries, why would anyone want to go there? Venus would be more exciting to me!
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Old 06-01-2012, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Arizona, The American Southwest
52,155 posts, read 30,218,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen431 View Post
We're not sending anyone to Saturn until we figure out who built that giant hexagon at their north pole.


From a distance it looks like a perfect hexagon, but a closer shot reveals more detail. As mentioned in the video, similar hexagon patterns have appeared on the earth's north pole and they're caused by wind vortexes, so the ones on Saturn's north pole might have also been caused by similar vortexes.

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Old 06-01-2012, 01:08 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,219 posts, read 55,086,587 times
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Mars is just another marble in the universe. We all live on one.


Man in black - ending HD - YouTube
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Old 06-15-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
1,618 posts, read 3,202,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TN Tin Man View Post
After 20 years working at the Space Center.. This is the problem with going to Mars..
The Guesstimation at current technology is 16 months one way... 1 person for 24 hours would need minimum 1 gallon of water hygiene~ cooking ~ general hydration which weight is approximately 8 pounds per gallon times 16 months minimum stay 25 days times 16 months return home total of 32 months + 25 days. This is only for water ! They have proven technology of reclaiming waste water about 10%-20% it does work..called reverse osmosis. Now figure food and fuel and experiments plus extra crew.The vehicle would be massive.. and most feel that going threw the Van Allen Belt would be extremely difficult due too very high radiation. Until we get warp drive or Scotty beams us up we can only speculate.
Ever since reading science fiction stories by Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke, I have been very interested about a possible manned Mars mission. The argument is that in addition to everything we would learn about Mars and our solar system, it would also be a stepping stone on the way out of the solar system, maybe to other systems.

About your problem about the water/food requirements, how close are we developing hypersleep, like in many SF movies ? Can the technology to suspend people in sleep for long periods of time (till they arrive close to Mars) be developed?
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Old 06-16-2012, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,410 posts, read 26,675,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
Ever since reading science fiction stories by Isaac Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke, I have been very interested about a possible manned Mars mission. The argument is that in addition to everything we would learn about Mars and our solar system, it would also be a stepping stone on the way out of the solar system, maybe to other systems.

About your problem about the water/food requirements, how close are we developing hypersleep, like in many SF movies ? Can the technology to suspend people in sleep for long periods of time (till they arrive close to Mars) be developed?

SpaceX already has the technology for tourism to Mars, it just isn't a reasonable price yet.
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Old 06-17-2012, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,298,987 times
Reputation: 1009
All I care about at this point is being able to witness a rocket as big and powerful as the Saturn V lifting off...that was something I was born almost two decades too late for. I want to see NASA's Space Launch System built, especially with the recreated F-1 engine...I know as of several months ago that option was being considered.
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Old 06-17-2012, 05:33 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,652,520 times
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Heck yes we should go to Mars, mankind needs to expand.

All we're doing now is killing each other off living on this mudball.
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Old 06-18-2012, 02:21 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,825 posts, read 20,501,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amylewis View Post
Okay, I'd like to just toss this out there and see what people think. Should we spend the vast amounts of money it would cost and undertake the risks of a manned mission to Mars? Would it be worth it? In what sense? Do you think we will find evidence of present or past life there? Would it be worth it to establish a colony there? Should we go there just to go there and be able to say we did it?

Enquiring minds want to know...
In a word: Yes. We should send a manned-mission to Mars, but not yet. Presumably we want those people we send to Mars to return to Earth, alive. Currently, we lack the technology to accomplish that objective. We can build spacecraft to accomplish that objective, but the people on board would not survive.

There are two major problems once humans leave Earth:
  • They leave behind the magnetosphere that blocks 90% of the charged particles in the solar winds; and
  • Without gravity the body begins to lose muscle and bone mass, rapidly. As much as 5% per week.
Going to the moon and back in three days is one thing (and they were very lucky), spending two years in space, or on Mars which does not have a magnetosphere as strong as Earth's, is really pushing their luck. It only takes one solar flare in their general direction, and everything living is now dead.

Once we figure out how to protect those we send to Mars, so they can return to Earth alive, then I am all for going to Mars.

Just as our trip to the moon gave us insights into its formation, through its composition, Mars would be the very first truly alien object that we visit, and that will give us insights into other planets and moons. The geology could be studied in far more detail by humans than by machine. Understanding the history of Mars will help us understand why Mars is the way it is today. It may also tell us how abundant life may be. It is speculated that Mars may have had a much warmer climate, with a denser atmosphere, and liquid water. However, over time because of its very weak magnetosphere, the atmosphere was slowly stripped away by the solar winds. If that assumption is correct, then it is very possible that we could find evidence of microbial life. Lets not forget than for 3 billion years there was only single-celled microbial life on Earth. Complex and advanced life forms did not exist until 500 million years ago. Mars has probably been lifeless for more than 500 million years, but without plate tectonics on Mars we should be able to find geology that is older.

I do not see Mars becoming a colony within the next few hundred years. A research base, certainly, but considering the conditions and the expense of getting there, I just do not see why anyone would want to live there. Living on the surface of Mars would be very difficult, and expensive. Living underground would be more practical, but you would still have to produce your own atmosphere and pressure. One could do that on Earth and it would be much cheaper.

Once we reach the point were corporations have moved into space, Mars may become a useful source for natural resources, but so would the asteroid belt. It would also be cheaper to mine the asteroid belt than to produce the fuel to lift a rocket into orbit from Mars.

Beyond pure science, there really is not much use for Mars.
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Old 06-18-2012, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,111,296 times
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Would there be any advantage of establishing a Moon Base first and launching a Mars expedition from there?
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