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Old 06-12-2012, 10:52 AM
 
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Wow.

Highest-energy light from a solar flare ever detected

Quote:
ScienceDaily (June 11, 2012) — A solar flare is an explosive blast of light and charged particles. The powerful March 7 flare, which earned a classification of X5.4 based on the peak intensity of its X-rays, is the strongest eruption so far observed by Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT). The flare produced such an outpouring of gamma rays -- a form of light with even greater energy than X-rays -- that the sun briefly became the brightest object in the gamma-ray sky.
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Old 06-12-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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I wonder if that somehow relates to this:
Earth bathed in high-energy radiation from colossal mystery blast ? The Register
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Old 06-12-2012, 05:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post

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"We argue that neither a solar flare nor a local supernova is likely to have been responsible" for the burst, say the paper's authors, citing the two most likely sources for such an immense surge in high-energy radiation.
So, I think the answer to your question is probably no, probably.
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Old 06-12-2012, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Not necessarily. I don't think they considered a strong gamma ray burst without a concurrent burst at other parts of the spectrum. Do gamma rays excite the auroras? Just asking...
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Old 06-12-2012, 08:36 PM
 
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All I can tell you is what the authors conclusions were.
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Old 06-18-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Not necessarily. I don't think they considered a strong gamma ray burst without a concurrent burst at other parts of the spectrum. Do gamma rays excite the auroras? Just asking...
Yes. As do x-rays.
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Old 06-18-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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I thought the auroras were caused by solar wind electrons caught in the magnetic field ionizing atmospheric gasses which them emit light as they return to ground state. Electromagnetic radiation is not effected by the magnetic field and I do not think it will ionise the gasses in the atmosphere.

Would someone clarify?
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Old 06-18-2012, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
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Originally Posted by GregW View Post
I thought the auroras were caused by solar wind electrons caught in the magnetic field ionizing atmospheric gasses which them emit light as they return to ground state. Electromagnetic radiation is not effected by the magnetic field and I do not think it will ionise the gasses in the atmosphere.

Would someone clarify?
That is correct, and it is how energized those electrons are that determine the colors of auroras. The shorter the wave-length, the more energized the electrons become. Normally green light is common in aurora, coming from atomic oxygen. If the particles are very energetic, red and blue light may start appearing near the bottom of the auroral curtains as the particles interact with molecular nitrogen. Also the more energized the electrons, the brighter the aurora.


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