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Old 06-17-2012, 04:34 AM
 
3,426 posts, read 2,790,478 times
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Very interesting video


ScienceCasts: Why Won't the Supernova Explode? - YouTube
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Old 06-17-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
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That was an interesting video, thanks for sharing.

I am not sure why they cannot get their computer models to work correctly.

We know how a star dies, depending upon its mass.
  • A star under 3 solar masses cannot get past electron degeneration, and forms a white dwarf. As it collapses into a white dwarf, the dying star will slowly shed its outer layers to form a planetary nebula.
  • A star with 3 to 10 solar masses can muster enough pressure to get past the electron degeneration, but is stopped by neutrons. As the neutron ledge is reached, the core briefly rebounds triggering a supernova, leaving only a neutron star behind.
  • A star with more than 10 solar masses, and less than 130 solar masses have enough pressure to get beyond even neutron degeneration, and the star forms a black hole. As the singularity is formed a shock wave causes the outer layers to explode. The star is also spinning incredibly fast, several hundred times per second, which forms the accretion disc. If the star is massive enough, it could also generate a Gamma Ray Burst from its poles.
  • A star above 130 solar masses have enough free electrons and positrons, combined with energetic gamma rays, to reduce thermal pressure at the core. As a result a supernova is produced, but there is nothing left behind. No black hole, no neutron star, no white dwarf, nothing.
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Old 06-17-2012, 11:30 AM
 
3,426 posts, read 2,790,478 times
Reputation: 3318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
That was an interesting video, thanks for sharing.

I am not sure why they cannot get their computer models to work correctly.

We know how a star dies, depending upon its mass.
  • A star under 3 solar masses cannot get past electron degeneration, and forms a white dwarf. As it collapses into a white dwarf, the dying star will slowly shed its outer layers to form a planetary nebula.
  • A star with 3 to 10 solar masses can muster enough pressure to get past the electron degeneration, but is stopped by neutrons. As the neutron ledge is reached, the core briefly rebounds triggering a supernova, leaving only a neutron star behind.
  • A star with more than 10 solar masses, and less than 130 solar masses have enough pressure to get beyond even neutron degeneration, and the star forms a black hole. As the singularity is formed a shock wave causes the outer layers to explode. The star is also spinning incredibly fast, several hundred times per second, which forms the accretion disc. If the star is massive enough, it could also generate a Gamma Ray Burst from its poles.
  • A star above 130 solar masses have enough free electrons and positrons, combined with energetic gamma rays, to reduce thermal pressure at the core. As a result a supernova is produced, but there is nothing left behind. No black hole, no neutron star, no white dwarf, nothing.
Obviously there is something that is happening that we don't yet understand. That's why they launched NuStar, to try to find out what we aren't understanding about Supernovae.
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