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Old 07-02-2012, 08:51 PM
 
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I have always wondered about something...Now I know that anything that falls into a blackhole would be ripped into an almost infinite amount of sub-atomic particles. I know that. However, let's just say that it was somehow possible to build a craft so strong, the force of gravity of even a blackhole could not tear it apart. Lets's say we sent that probe into the blackhole. Where would it go?
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
I have always wondered about something...Now I know that anything that falls into a blackhole would be ripped into an almost infinite amount of sub-atomic particles. I know that. However, let's just say that it was somehow possible to build a craft so strong, the force of gravity of even a blackhole could not tear it apart. Lets's say we sent that probe into the blackhole. Where would it go?
Let me preface by saying that I'm no expert in this field and I could be way off. However, I have watched a buttload of educational documentaries on this subject so I will be going off of what I have learned from those.

Having said that,
I don't think black holes go anywhere. My understanding of them is that they aren't even holes but rather an area around something of such extreme mass (such as a singularity) that light cannot escape its gravitational pull. Imagine a marble as being a singularity then place that marble in the center of a sphere (which will represent it's gravitational pull) and that sphere could be described as the black hole.

If you could build a ship strong enough to avoid annihilation from the gravitational field, you would probably just pass right through to the opposite side. It wouldn't go anywhere. Black holes aren't wormholes.

However, time becomes slowed near black holes (gravity has a dragging effect on time) so the person observing it from a distance would age more than the object itself passing through. Black holes can actually be considered naturally occurring time machines

Last edited by Adric; 07-02-2012 at 11:24 PM..
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Old 07-02-2012, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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There is a term for that type of speculative question. It escapes me at the moment. There is no scientific answer, as the parameters exclude the possibility. Another version of the same question form is "If you were able to go through a mirror, into the world that is the reflection, where would you end up?"
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 9,076,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adric View Post
Let me preface by saying that I'm no expert in this field and I could be way off. However, I have watched a buttload of educational documentaries on this subject so I will be going off of what I have learned from those.

Having said that,
I don't think black holes go anywhere. My understanding of them is that they aren't even holes but rather an area around something of such extreme mass (such as a singularity) that light cannot escape its gravitational pull. Imagine a marble as being a singularity then place that marble in the center of a sphere (which will represent it's gravitational pull) and that sphere could be described as the black hole.

If you could build a ship strong enough to avoid annihilation from the gravitational field, you would probably just pass right through to the opposite side. It wouldn't go anywhere. Black holes aren't wormholes.

However, time becomes slowed near black holes (gravity has a dragging effect on time) so the person observing it from a distance would age more than the object itself passing through. Black holes can actually be considered naturally occurring time machines
I believe anything falling into a black hole would be ripped to pieces. But, assuming anything could be built to avoid annihilation, it would be trapped forever in the black hole. There are some rapidly spinning black holes and quasars that form jets from the centers, though.
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:37 AM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,205,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lentzr View Post
I have always wondered about something...Now I know that anything that falls into a blackhole would be ripped into an almost infinite amount of sub-atomic particles. I know that. However, let's just say that it was somehow possible to build a craft so strong, the force of gravity of even a blackhole could not tear it apart. Lets's say we sent that probe into the blackhole. Where would it go?
I think the question should be 'What would happen?" rather than where would it go. If a craft could be indestructable to the gravitational forces, you would probably end up forever trapped at the center. There are different kinds of black holes. Some are supermassive black holes and some are stellar mass black holes. There is likely to be intermediate sized black holes as well. We'll disregard micro black holes and primordial black holes. We'd also have to consider whether the black hole is rotating or is stationary. Regardless of the size and conditions of the black hole, eventually you'd be on a one-way trip with a pretty nasty ending.

It helps to have a better idea about black holes to answer the question of what would happen if you fell into one. They are not just objects in space. They are more like wells of extreme gravity that distort, pull in and compress space and time, and anything that falls into it.

Here are a few clips that look at the question of what would happen if you fell into a black hole.




What's Inside a Black Hole? - YouTube



A Journey into a Black Hole - YouTube



What Would Happen If You Fell into a Black Hole? - YouTube



Neil DeGrasse Tyson - Death By Black Hole - YouTube
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Old 07-03-2012, 04:31 PM
 
1,675 posts, read 2,562,800 times
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I've often wondered for a long time if black holes affect the anti universe (if there is indeed an anti universe) and/or parallel universes due to their ability to distort time and space. I made a little graph to better illustrate what I mean:



And some reading:

Space-based detector could find anti-universe

Any thoughts?
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:08 PM
 
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WOW! Thanks guys, but you guys are way ahead of me!
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Old 07-24-2012, 05:39 PM
 
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If a singularity is at a point in space and it has a an event horizon with a particular Schwarzschild Radius, then, it would seem, a black hole covers a finite expanse of space.

However, according to one coordinate system, inside a black hole the space and time coordinates switch! Therefore, a singularity is not a point in space by a point in time. So entering a black hole anyone would travel through time and hit the singularity at that particular point in time, e.g. midnight of March 20, 1066.
(Read here [Inside a Black Hole section], for example: Spacetime Geometry Inside a Black Hole)

But assuming it's spatial within, wouldn't the fact that space is infinitely curved at the point of the singularity mean that you would continually fall towards the singularity, but never reach it? Think how space is curved due to the presence of a mass and you fall down that curvature toward that mass (i.e. what we conceive as falling due to gravity).

Taking this further, what about falling into a black hole that is connected to another via an Einstein-Rosen bridge?

Very chewy questions. :-)
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Old 07-26-2012, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
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I definitely believe a star would fall into a black hole, and that it would be ripped to pieces. This black hole will be spewing x-rays for awhile, maybe into next year at least.
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Old 08-04-2012, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
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Assuming you weren't ripped into billions of pieces of confetti, my understanding is you would just keep falling into nothingness.
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