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Old 07-23-2012, 10:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SolarDub View Post
With the rock dropped in the pond analogy, the pond is finite and bounded, so the wave will dissipate around the edge.
The universe, however, while being finite, is unbounded, so the waves of the background radiation will, if uninhibited, continue to propagate with their wavelength increasing due to the expansion of space-time.
O.k. as that makes sense .
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Old 07-23-2012, 12:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
The Big Bang Cosmic Inflation must had been incredible as they stated in the video that the universe minimum diameter is estimated around 156 billion light years across as that is just friggin huge.
I agree. It really is staggering to even remotely fathom such scales, so much that we can only imagine it abstractly. There has to be a connection between the very small and the very large which is all a unified part of the universe. The Big Bang starting so mind-numbingly small but generating enough energy to create everything that exists in the entire universe. It seems impossible, but it has been worked out in theory to show it could be done. It's possible the actual universe could be 10 billion trillion times larger than the observable universe, and it all began about 13.75 billion years ago.

We'll never directly know exactly how large the universe is or how many galaxies might exist far beyond the observable horizon. The accelerated expansion of space guarantees that if it continues to expand indefinitely, then even nearby galaxies will eventually become spread out so far from each other that any intelligent observers in the far distant future would know of nothing else that exists (even if it does) beyond their own galaxy, apart from the blackness of space. To them, their galaxy would seem to be the entire universe. And even that won't last forever.
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Old 07-23-2012, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
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So, before the bang, I guess it would've been a humongous black hole if it weren't for the dark matter.

It still bugs me about how it got into that fix in the first place...
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Old 07-24-2012, 02:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
So, before the bang, I guess it would've been a humongous black hole if it weren't for the dark matter.

It still bugs me about how it got into that fix in the first place...
Don't feel frustrated about it Brian. It bugs me too. It's a big question that bugs everyone, the brightest minds included. There are loads of hypotheses, but none can be confidently regarded as being the one and only answer. It really gets down to the question of why the Big Bang happened at all. Was there a "before"? If there was, then it suggests that time is much deeper than we can imagine. Or did time emerge along with space from the Big Bang? It's pretty hard to imagine exactly how time or space could preexist if everything began at zero point.

Interesting thought about Dark Matter. There are a number of things it might be, but it remains another unknown only observes by its effects. Was there Dark Matter before the Big Bang? What effect would Dark Matter have on a black hole? From what I can understand, Dark Matter has certainly made a large contribution to the structure of the universe, in terms of galaxies, clusters, and the web-like filiments. Since Dark Matter seems to be gravitationally associated with the objects and structures, then its clear that there are likely areas or voids in the universe where there is very little to no Dark Matter at all. Maybe Dark Matter started out rather clumpy, kind of like we see in the CMBR?
What is dark matter? | plus.maths.org
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Old 07-24-2012, 03:07 AM
 
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If everything started with the big bang then time and space must have also started at that time and if the big bangs sphere of influence is expanding outward their must be some strange phenomena happening at the leading edge of that expansion as time and space intermingle with the absence of anything, perhaps that dark matter is some form of quasi matter that just didnt fully make the transition from nothing to reality.
I sometimes wonder if we even at this point of our evolution have the mental capabilities to understand what went before the big bang or what lies outside its sphere of influence.

Last edited by jambo101; 07-24-2012 at 03:23 AM..
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:00 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,041,369 times
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Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
So, before the bang, I guess it would've been a humongous black hole if it weren't for the dark matter.
After reading this i just had an ''einstein moment'' and so knowing just how prodigiously powerful some of the supernovas can be e.g. ''SN2006gy'' just then what if ..... the beginning of the universe wasn't a quantum compaction of all the universe's known energy bound into a singularity and henceforth subsequent mind boggling explosion but instead the singularity point was all combined in a unfathomable giant star that exploded as a supernova and hence our current expanding universe?
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Texas
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From what I've read, the bang started very slowly, relatively speaking. Some of the elements of the elements of the bang were dark energy, dark matter, gravity. Gravity and dark matter was not enough to constrain the dark energy.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
After reading this i just had an ''einstein moment'' and so knowing just how prodigiously powerful some of the supernovas can be e.g. ''SN2006gy'' just then what if ..... the beginning of the universe wasn't a quantum compaction of all the universe's known energy bound into a singularity and henceforth subsequent mind boggling explosion but instead the singularity point was all combined in a unfathomable giant star that exploded as a supernova and hence our current expanding universe?
Where'd this giant star come from?
I think the term Big Bang is rather inadequate term to describe how absolute nothingness morphed into the expanding universe we observe today,big bang i suppose is as close an analogy as our minds can comprehend at this point.What was before? what is beyond? what will be after?,maybe someday we'll understand,for now we can only speculate and be awed at the grandeur of what is...
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Old 07-24-2012, 03:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Where'd this giant star come from?
I was being somewhat facetious as i realise that an ''Singularity Star'' would've needed Hydrogen for it's fusion which only could have been produced during the Epoch of Recombination ''shortly'' after the Big Bang. It's all intriguing nonetheless.
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Old 07-24-2012, 04:05 PM
 
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Fascinating section Might get me to drop my addiction to that dysfunctional political section.
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