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Old 08-02-2017, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
3,711 posts, read 1,358,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
If you're going to be in Madras, you'll be really close to the center of the totality zone and will give you 100% obscurity. Even if someone were a sliver off from the totality, such as Portland or Eugene, it will still be a strange and unforgettable experience. I can better understand why ancient people experiencing a total eclipse, and didn't understand what was happening, may have thought it was a fearsome omen of doom, something that swallowed up the sun during daytime.

Here's a good map that shows the totality. Zoom in to your location. You can click on the town to show a box describing the obscurity percentage and other interesting information.
USA - 2017 August 21 Total Solar Eclipse - Interactive Google Map - Xavier Jubier
I could stay home and get a sliver, but I'm going to be as close to the center line as I can get. The easy solution would be for me to view it from the coast. That way I could just drive up really early in the morning. But then I might have to deal with coastal fog during the eclipse. Though normally the morning fog and clouds burn off by that time, it would be close. If I drive to Madras, then I will have perfect weather, but I would have to drive the day before, and sleep in my car overnight. I'll make up my mind the day before, where I'm going, based on weather and traffic reports.

Here is another good map that explains the pros and cons of different viewing locations. Click on the map to make it bigger and easier to read.

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Old 08-02-2017, 07:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
I could stay home and get a sliver, but I'm going to be as close to the center line as I can get. The easy solution would be for me to view it from the coast. That way I could just drive up really early in the morning. But then I might have to deal with coastal fog during the eclipse. Though normally the morning fog and clouds burn off by that time, it would be close. If I drive to Madras, then I will have perfect weather, but I would have to drive the day before, and sleep in my car overnight. I'll make up my mind the day before, where I'm going, based on weather and traffic reports.

Here is another good map that explains the pros and cons of different viewing locations. Click on the map to make it bigger and easier to read.
Madras will certainly put you in the area of 100% totality, although it might be toasty. Hopefully not as toasty as it is today. The Valley has been very hazy today from smoke, probably from forest fires in the Cascades. I wouldn't think Madras would be all that crowded with sightseers.

On the other hand, Lincoln Beach, also in the area of 100% totality, should be cooler from the ocean breezes blowing in. At a guess, the Coast could be packed with people wanting a good view. Either location would be a great choice though.

Thanks for posting the map.
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Old 08-07-2017, 11:42 AM
 
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Another good tool.. Go to https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/ and plug in your city/state, and you will be able to tell what percentage of a total eclipse you will see.

So, for example, just pulling a random US city.. I plugged in Biloxi, MS and it returned that it will be about an 83% total. It also tells you the next 5 upcoming visible eclipses and transits.

You can also go to https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/JSEX/JSEX-index.html you can plug in your location and see when the next total solar eclipse will happen (Along with all other solar eclipses)

For example, plugging in the coordinates for Greenville, SC, I can see the next total solar eclipse will happen on May 11, 2078. Followed by October 17, 2153.. Just in case anyone wants to book those hotel rooms early.

You can also go back in time to see that the last total solar eclipse visible here was October 23, 1623.. Just for those who need to set the dates in their DeLorean.

Some cities.. I looked up Washington, DC for someone on Facebook after their smart ass comment about waiting for the next one rather than traveling to see this one.. DC hasn't been in the path of totality since July 29, 1478 and won't be in the path until something like 2448 and that one is right at sunrise.
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Old 08-07-2017, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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I think the eclipse maps without an accompanying link to historical and projected weather are worthless. I can imagine people trekking to the Great Smokey Mountains and forgetting the amount of fog, cloud cover, and haze. If a location is covered up with clouds, you aren't going to see anything other than darkness. You can do that at night, any night.
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Old 08-07-2017, 03:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I think the eclipse maps without an accompanying link to historical and projected weather are worthless. I can imagine people trekking to the Great Smokey Mountains and forgetting the amount of fog, cloud cover, and haze. If a location is covered up with clouds, you aren't going to see anything other than darkness. You can do that at night, any night.
Weather is a complete roll of the dice.

I'm visiting my dad in Des Moines, which is outside the path, this weekend.. but, we had thought about going up there the next weekend and driving down to the St Joe's area.. But.. Which is better? Either place could have rain that day.
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Old 08-07-2017, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
3,711 posts, read 1,358,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I think the eclipse maps without an accompanying link to historical and projected weather are worthless. I can imagine people trekking to the Great Smokey Mountains and forgetting the amount of fog, cloud cover, and haze. If a location is covered up with clouds, you aren't going to see anything other than darkness. You can do that at night, any night.
Here you go. This gives pretty good information about cloud cover. Unfortunately the conditions here in Oregon are not looking great at this point. The 14 day weather forecast is not showing favorable conditions for eclipse day, and to make matters worse, we have a major forest fire burning out of control right on the centerline. Even if they get it under control in the next two weeks, the area will still be filled with smoke.


2017 OVERVIEW
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Old 08-07-2017, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
3,711 posts, read 1,358,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
Weather is a complete roll of the dice.

I'm visiting my dad in Des Moines, which is outside the path, this weekend.. but, we had thought about going up there the next weekend and driving down to the St Joe's area.. But.. Which is better? Either place could have rain that day.
Another option for you would be to drive west on I-80 to Grand Island. That might give you slightly better viewing conditions. Either way the traffic will probably be bad. So start early.
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Old 08-07-2017, 04:16 PM
 
4,947 posts, read 7,696,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I think the eclipse maps without an accompanying link to historical and projected weather are worthless. I can imagine people trekking to the Great Smokey Mountains and forgetting the amount of fog, cloud cover, and haze. If a location is covered up with clouds, you aren't going to see anything other than darkness. You can do that at night, any night.
That raises a good point. The eclipse maps are just showing the path of the eclipse. It doesn't, and understandably so, doesn't include any weather predictions. Sure, the weather could change making viewing opportunities limited in various areas along the path. We've been having haze from the smoke of forest fires. Earlier, I thought it was coming from fires in the Cascade mountains, but it's not. It's mostly coming from fires in BC Canada. The sky above is slightly hazy today, but vastly improved from a few days ago. The sky is a little bit bluer, so sun is visible. Hopefully, it'll continue to improve or clear up altogether. Regardless, no one should stare directly at the sun.

As for me, I don't have to travel at all since I live right in the path of totality. If it rains or becomes so cloudy that it can't be seen, it would be a pity but that's okay. Even if all a person can see is that change from light to darkness to light again, that's still going to be very impressive because it's so much faster. The difference between the normal cycle of day and night is very slow and gradual. The change for the eclipse is just a few minutes of darkness. Not something a person sees and experiences every day.

There could be sections along the path where perfect viewing conditions might be less than ideal but the effects will still be quite noticeable.
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Old 08-10-2017, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,014 posts, read 526,908 times
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This is great information, thank you everybody. I had to go to a clock conversion site to figure out in my time what the military time meant. Never understood that. No glasses here. I suppose we could put on my DH's welder's helmets, those would work, right?
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Old 08-10-2017, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
6,206 posts, read 3,371,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Answers View Post
No glasses here. I suppose we could put on my DH's welder's helmets, those would work, right?
Not unless it's #14 welder's glass.

If you can't get a safe solar filter, use a projection method to indirectly view the eclipse safely. Don't risk your eyes.
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