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Old 08-21-2017, 09:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
I was in the totality zone, South Carolina, and thought it was definitely cool to see, it was my first total solar eclipse, but afterwords I was thinking a total solar eclipse during sunrise or right before sunset (if those are even a possibility) would be the "ultimate" since the sun would appear to be huge due to the optical illusion.
After doing a bit of digging, apparently, solar eclipses can occur at or near sunrise and sunset. As I understand it, the 2017 eclipse appeared at the westernmost point out in the Pacific Ocean between Alaska and Hawaii, essentially at about 8:46 AM. The view from Alaska or Hawaii would have been seen as a partial eclipse. At the easternmost point out in the Central Atlantic, more or less between Cape Verde (NW Africa) and Brazil, the eclipse would have been close to sunset. Parts of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland would have seen it as a partial eclipse about 7:35 PM. It all depends on the path of the eclipse and where it begins and ends which varies. Remember, solar eclipses are seen on whatever side of the planet is facing the sun.
https://www.quora.com/Can-a-total-so...ur-at-sun-rise
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Old 08-21-2017, 11:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
I was in the totality zone, South Carolina, and thought it was definitely cool to see, it was my first total solar eclipse, but afterwords I was thinking a total solar eclipse during sunrise or right before sunset (if those are even a possibility) would be the "ultimate" since the sun would appear to be huge due to the optical illusion.
You might be right.. I've been in the path of totality for the past 2 US eclipses (Hawaii in '91 and this one).. Both happened decently well into the daytime. Hawaii was close to 11am as I recall, and was obscured.. This one was basically mid-day here in SC. It's darker the closer you are to the center.. But people who were thinking it'd get pitch black.. No.. That's not going to happen, because remember, if you're dead center, there's sunlight 35 miles away. So, the best you'll get is something of a twilight.

The problem with early or late eclipses is that the sun is closer to the horizon, and more apt to be obscured by clouds.

My understanding.. While where I was in Greenville, SC.. There was nary a cloud in the sky.. Just 30 miles away in Anderson, it was fairly well obscured by cloud cover.

I had thought about visiting my dad in Des Moines and us driving down to St Joe's, MO to watch it.. But.. I figured whatever decision could be the wrong one.. Oddly.. Seems I got it right, as I heard Missouri didn't have clear skies.
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Old 08-22-2017, 08:19 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
This is not the first total solar eclipse visible from CONUS in a century.

The solar eclipse of 1979 was total from Washington/Oregon through northwestern North Dakota. Solar eclipses in 1970 and 1963 were also total in parts of the lower 48. And coming up in 2024 and 2045 there will be total eclipses that cross CONUS.
i kinda' remember an eclipse in 1993 or 1994 ?
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Old 08-22-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
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If you go to the eclipse map you will see the outline of the areas where sunrise and sunset are visible as part of the event.
USA - 2017 August 21 Total Solar Eclipse - Interactive Google Map - Xavier Jubier
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
This one was basically mid-day here in SC. It's darker the closer you are to the center.. But people who were thinking it'd get pitch black.. No.. That's not going to happen, because remember, if you're dead center, there's sunlight 35 miles away. So, the best you'll get is something of a twilight.
Thanks for the interesting post! I've been through a couple of partial eclipses, but this was the first time for me to experience a total eclipse.

Where I was located, it wasn't exactly pitch black like it can get at night, but it was pretty close to it. All the street lights and automatic lights in front of houses came on and Venus was brightly shining in the sky. Didn't see any other planets or stars though. The time of totality for us was about 10:17 AM and lasted a little under two minutes. It was pretty dark for those 2 minutes, but looking out at the horizon, I could see it wasn't as dark there as where I was, at least from my viewpoint. Looking around at our local surroundings, it was pretty dark. We were a little off dead center, but close enough that it seemed a little darker than twilight for us.

All in all, it was a pretty unique experience. Prior to the actual totality of the eclipse, when there was just a razor thin edge of the sun, things looked dusky, or closer to twilight with darkness but a little bit of fading sunlight. But at the moment of totality, it seemed pretty dark. However (and this might be a reason to think of it as similar to twilight), that ring of glowing light from the sun (the corona) was in itself still bright enough to prevent complete darkness as night would actually be. It's hard to define because it wasn't exactly the kind of darkness that occurs at night, but it wasn't exactly like twilight either. it was just a very unique kind of darkness that you can only see from a total solar eclipse. That "diamond ring effect" at the end of totality as the sun began to emerge from behind the moon was a very impressive sight.
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labonte18 View Post
<>This one was basically mid-day here in SC. It's darker the closer you are to the center.. But people who were thinking it'd get pitch black.. No.. That's not going to happen, because remember, if you're dead center, there's sunlight 35 miles away. So, the best you'll get is something of a twilight.<>
We were at the Santee Southbound I-95 rest area. Some clouds up until 1:00 PM then none up high for the eclipse itself. I knew we would be surrounded by a band of light 35 miles away, so at totality I remembered to look around at the horizon. Another amazing glimpse of the sky as we were surrounded by sunrise/sunset light in the low clouds.
As totality ended we could see the clouds in the East were still black like in a storm since they were still in shadow. We saw crescents projected onto the ground under the trees for several minutes afterwards. I missed seeing the oncoming shadow from the West as I was overcome by the sight of totality approaching. The diamond ring flashing with the purest white light just after peak eclipse was wonderful.
"And the crowd went wild"
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
The diamond ring flashing with the purest white light just after peak eclipse was wonderful.
"And the crowd went wild"
That reminded me of a Beatles song written by George Harrison.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgiQD56eWDk
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
That reminded me of a Beatles song written by George Harrison.
<>
Good one. This morning CBS mentioned Bonnie Tyler sales are up 500%

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcOxhH8N3Bo
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Old 08-22-2017, 12:17 PM
 
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As in 1979, here in Fort Worth we had 70 percent coverage or so.


However, all good things comes to those that wait. The next such event is Monday, April 8, 2024, and it will pass right over me in the Fort Worth/Dallas area.


I bet those solar glasses will be cheap to buy, now.


https://herrett.csi.edu/images/astro...lipse_path.jpg
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by legalsea View Post
As in 1979, here in Fort Worth we had 70 percent coverage or so.


However, all good things comes to those that wait. The next such event is Monday, April 8, 2024, and it will pass right over me in the Fort Worth/Dallas area.


I bet those solar glasses will be cheap to buy, now.


https://herrett.csi.edu/images/astro...lipse_path.jpg
I'm sure there will be plenty of closeout sales. I wouldn't be surprised the leftover stock would be priced at 50-cents each just to sell them off. I bought 3 on Friday for $1.99 each. The store had tons of them. I saw a YT video today of a trip to Idaho Falls to see the eclipse and someone in a parked car at a crowded location was selling the glasses for $5.00 each to last minute shoppers. Yesterday, my neighbor (in Oregon) said he knew a guy who bought up a bunch and was selling them for $7.00 each.
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