U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-31-2018, 08:09 AM
 
12,229 posts, read 3,229,016 times
Reputation: 8147

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
They may still be in the stone age. I mean, if they never got beyond hunter/gatherers competing for resources, they will have spent all of their years fighting. For all we know, we are the most intelligent species within our "immediate" zone.

BTW - a thousand years doesn't necessarily mean significant advancement will take place during that time frame. They may have done a civilization "reset" within that period.
I believe there are probably lots of all types out there, Ive said before, its probably like the Star wars world, some systems are very highly advanced and others, they are still living like cave men, and some, may just be animal life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-31-2018, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
482 posts, read 230,186 times
Reputation: 891
I think we should be extremely cautious about it, as we have no idea how advanced and aggressive other life forms could be. If we're found out though, we'll have no choice but to try and interact with them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2018, 03:16 PM
Status: "living in a political world, where mercy walks the plank" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,725 posts, read 22,532,588 times
Reputation: 34279
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
I don't think we should attempt to contact aliens. There is no reason they wouldn't be hostile.
which is why we should shoot some of our extra nukes, randomly into outer space.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-04-2018, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
34,307 posts, read 59,623,818 times
Reputation: 33388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
which is why we should shoot some of our extra nukes, randomly into outer space.
AB-SO-LUTELY!!!!
We cannot be too careful!




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxLw0uas9Rc
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2018, 11:20 AM
 
11,331 posts, read 6,624,169 times
Reputation: 6237
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanAdventurer View Post
If they're out there they're laughing at what retards we all are.

We'll make great pets...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2018, 04:39 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
6,126 posts, read 1,971,074 times
Reputation: 8729
Yes we should contact aliens. The looks on the face of all the religious folks on earth would be well worth it. But obviously any alien race advanced enough to contact us, would laugh at archaic civilization.

Considering even humans and dinosaurs wouldn’t do well together, it’s safe to assume an alien specicies would be equally hostile or domineering.

It’s unfortunate that the distance is so insanely far that we won’t find out anytime soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2018, 05:57 AM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,270 posts, read 934,992 times
Reputation: 12519
Any civilization capable of crossing expanses of interstellar space to take this rock away from us almost surely has the technological capacity to detect and recognize the biosignatures of life-bearing atmospheres from across the light-years. With Earth, our insanely high level of free oxygen is a very strong indicator. Thus, they would already know we're here.

Any such civilization that also possesses the inclination to find such planets would also likely explore in the first place - with robotics, perhaps in the form of something like Von Neumann probes. Thus they would already know we're hear.

The idea that 'they' are out there, twiddling their thumbs (if they have them) and wishing that some civilization would transmit a "Hi! We're here! Why don't you stop by and visit?" Hallmark card so that they could come over and kick our asses come from people who get informed [ahem] about science by watching Hollywood films that don't have to actually make much sense to put butts in the seats.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2018, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,446 posts, read 11,236,067 times
Reputation: 28225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
...The looks on the face of all the religious folks on earth would be well worth it...
Obviously, you don't know much about "religious folks."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2018, 03:50 PM
 
22,784 posts, read 17,257,359 times
Reputation: 9491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Any civilization capable of crossing expanses of interstellar space to take this rock away from us almost surely has the technological capacity to detect and recognize the biosignatures of life-bearing atmospheres from across the light-years. With Earth, our insanely high level of free oxygen is a very strong indicator.
We're close to being able to analyze the atmosphere of some exoplanets. When a planet transits its star, the star's light passes through the planet's atmosphere. Scientists can do a spectral graphic analysis of the resulting light waves to gain clues about the atmospheric makeup of the planet. If the star is too big and bright our current instruments can't do it, but we can do it if the planet orbits a smaller and dimmer star such as TRAPPIST-1. When the James Webb Space Telescope is launched and operational we'll be able to better analyze the atmosphere of such exoplanets.
July 20, 2016

NASA’s Hubble Telescope Makes First Atmospheric Study of Earth-Sized Exoplanets

''Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have conducted the first search for atmospheres around temperate, Earth-sized planets beyond our solar system and found indications that increase the chances of habitability on two exoplanets.

Specifically, they discovered that the exoplanets TRAPPIST-1b and TRAPPIST-1c, approximately 40 light-years away, are unlikely to have puffy, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres usually found on gaseous worlds.''

''Observations from future telescopes, including NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, will help determine the full composition of these atmospheres and hunt for potential biosignatures, such as carbon dioxide and ozone, in addition to water vapor and methane. Webb also will analyze a planet’s temperature and surface pressure – key factors in assessing its habitability.''

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/n...zed-exoplanets
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2018, 05:39 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,270 posts, read 934,992 times
Reputation: 12519
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Any civilization capable of crossing expanses of interstellar space to take this rock away from us almost surely has the technological capacity to detect and recognize the biosignatures of life-bearing atmospheres from across the light-years. With Earth, our insanely high level of free oxygen is a very strong indicator. Thus, they would already know we're here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike555 View Post
We're close to being able to analyze the atmosphere of some exoplanets. When a planet transits its star, the star's light passes through the planet's atmosphere. Scientists can do a spectral graphic analysis of the resulting light waves to gain clues about the atmospheric makeup of the planet. If the star is too big and bright our current instruments can't do it, but we can do it if the planet orbits a smaller and dimmer star such as TRAPPIST-1. When the James Webb Space Telescope is launched and operational we'll be able to better analyze the atmosphere of such exoplanets.
July 20, 2016

NASA’s Hubble Telescope Makes First Atmospheric Study of Earth-Sized Exoplanets

''Using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have conducted the first search for atmospheres around temperate, Earth-sized planets beyond our solar system and found indications that increase the chances of habitability on two exoplanets.

Specifically, they discovered that the exoplanets TRAPPIST-1b and TRAPPIST-1c, approximately 40 light-years away, are unlikely to have puffy, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres usually found on gaseous worlds.''

''Observations from future telescopes, including NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, will help determine the full composition of these atmospheres and hunt for potential biosignatures, such as carbon dioxide and ozone, in addition to water vapor and methane. Webb also will analyze a planet’s temperature and surface pressure – key factors in assessing its habitability.''

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/n...zed-exoplanets
Well, yes, that's exactly my point.

The technological capacity to discern significant details at interstellar distances is long going to proceed the technological capacity to cross said distances. Exoplanets are increasingly coming into focus (both metaphorically and literally) but we're a long way from being able to cross the interstellar void in any real capacity (craft like the Pioneers and Voyagers that are doing so, but not actually heading toward any particular stars and at any rate would take tens of thousands of years to reach the nearest one even if they were heading towards it don't count). We're even further away from meaningful force-projection at such distances.

This paper

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1711.00185.pdf

describes the feasibility of a sufficiently large telescope (surely within the engineering capability of any crowd that can build starships) to resolve the heat signatures (waste heat) that is going to be produced by any energy-consuming civilization, such as our own.

And this one

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1802.07723.pdf

argues that within a reasonable time frame (long before we're starfaring) we should be able to detect artificial satellites around exoplanets, which obviously sets a minimum technology threshold for whatever civilization dwells on that planet. We'll be doing that long before we're venturing out into interstellar space, and so too will any beings that can venture out there (and come here).

Thus, the whole "Ssssssh! Don't say anything! The Siriuns are listening!" is going to be pointless because if the Siriuns exist and are able to come here and start bossing us around, they've almost certainly long since understood that the third planet from Sol likely harbors life and have more recently very likely zeroed in on our technological level.

But I wouldn't worry too much about it. First, there's nothing we can do about it. Second, the economics of interstellar conquest are dubious, so I'm highly skeptical that anything that might be out there would try. Third, I strongly suspect that life even advanced to our level (far below the threat to other stars level) is sufficiently rate that it is very unlikely that such an entity even exists within thousands of light-years of us.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top