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Old 10-29-2017, 06:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
They probably never thought about that.
Yeah, I know, I guess that sounded kind of dorky. All that was basically said was in relation to the 50 foot deep hole which is part of the lava flow tube, and that it appears (from Japan's Selene Probe), that it looks like there's a sizable chamber below or near the hole (not optically seen). There! Is that better?

There have been some very impressive bots that have been developed that can traverse over rather rugged terrain. But if fallen rocks in the tube are anything like I would imagine, it would take a lot more than any bots to date to enter the hole or enter the tube. I'd bet there are a lot of obstacles in the tube Photo images have only shown the hole. Granted, nothing was said about any possibilities of going down the hole. That was just free thinking on my part.

Articles on the subject have speculated that such lava flow tube could be suitable as a habitat. I agree, it would, assuming there's a reasonably safe way to get in. It's possible there might be other openings that would provide easier access to reach the inside of the tube from the surface. In the lava tubes I've been in, the opening to the tubes were accessible, but only after climbing down large boulders in a crater-like depression to reach the opening to the tubes.

An exploration of the tube from the surface might be a good idea, using a rover or even a Moon Buggy, in search of openings that would be somewhat easily accessible by people. The tube estimated to be about 50 km (31 miles long) long is pretty lengthy indeed. Clearing out large rocks from the interior would require a major operation involving very large equipment to remove the debris. Such an undertaking would be a major project for the future best done as an international venture. The article indicates that the lava flow tubes were probably formed some 3.5 billion years ago. And they say the tube looks relatively stable. Granted, the entire tube (or chasm) isn't caved in, but after 3.5 billion years, rocks collapsed from the roof of the tube is likely without the entire roof caving in or creating a hole. The tubes I've been in had many such collapses. Many of the debris piles were perhaps 30-40 high. Going through the tubes involved climbing up and down one pile after another. There were lots of debris piles throughout the length of the tube until it reached a point that made it impossible to go any farther. The tubes were all part of a larger system. The sections I went through were perhaps a half-mile long (that's just a guess). But I know of tubes that are easily a mile long or longer. As far as I know, none of the numerous lava flow tubes that I went through are available for public access, except for one or two safe ones along Hwy 97 south of Bend, Oregon (stairs, smooth sandy floor, lantern rentals, etc) that are primarily tourist attractions but are suitable for families.

Air for human explorers on foot could be supplied by tanks on the surface outside of the tube access point using long flexible air hoses attached to the suits, assuming the hoses don't get snagged or ripped. As mentioned, the life support systems for astronauts doing EVA are limited to about 6.5 to 8 hours. That would include traveling to the site via Moon Buggy, entering the access point, and determining how relatively smooth the interior surface of the tube is. That is, could a rover be used to explore deeper into the tube? Then exit the tube and return to any manufactured habitat there would be on the surface. Chances are that the astronaut's spacecraft or habitat on the lunar surface is not going to be very close to the tube or access point. It would all take time, which also means using up air time. I don't know if that's been given any thought at the present time. Nothing in the article was mentioned as to how the interior of the tubes would be examined.

Here are a few quotes selected from the article from the link posted by the OP:

- Lava tubes “might be the best candidate sites for future lunar bases"...

- Careful examination of their interiors could provide unique insights concerning the evolutionary history of the moon.

- We haven’t actually seen the inside of the cave itself so there are high hopes that exploring it will offer more details...

Do you have any other ideas or opinions about it?
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Old 10-29-2017, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Calif
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I would not want to go anywhere except where I am, but if millions want to go colonize mars....GO! Earth needs to heal herself.
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Old 11-17-2017, 01:14 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
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Everyone here is thinking that people are going to do the work. It won't be humans, we will be sending robots to do the work. Right now, there are several viable robots that when connected to a power source, and do anything a human can do. All NASA has to do is pick the right robots, and get them to the surface in one piece. I am sure that scientists can develop a small nuclear power plant to run the robots. You send the robots, and let them do the work. Communication between the Moon and Earth is easy with today's technology.


I read a report that scientists believe that there are large titanium deposits in the Moon. This could revolutionize the construction, aerospace, and transportation industries. Titanium is stronger that Iron, just as light as Aluminum, and is naturally resistant to corrosion. Right now, due to the limited amounts that are mined on Earth, it is used only in the aerospace/military industries, medicine, and racing. Titanium can also be used in many alloys.


Who knows what other minerals/metals, are under the surface of the moon, waiting to be discovered.
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Old 11-18-2017, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,446 posts, read 11,231,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
...I read a report that scientists believe that there are large titanium deposits in the Moon...
There are large ilmenite deposits on the moon. However, processing the ilmenite into titanium requires other elements that might not be so abundant on the moon. One of those elements is carbon, something that is abundant on earth, but virtually nonexistent on the moon.
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Old 11-18-2017, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Texas
43,974 posts, read 53,808,417 times
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I thought moon dust was too much of a problem to make living there worth it.
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Old 12-05-2017, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
419 posts, read 295,349 times
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I remember learning on a school field trip way back in the day that caves keep the same average temperature throughout the year. Not sure if this would apply to the moon (-200 to +200 C degrees C), which could translate to a constant 0 degrees inside the cave? That would be almost livable at least temperature-wise. For the record I think Mars is much more worthy of long term colonization (after we build long term settlements in Antarctica).
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Old 12-05-2017, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Best estimates appear to be around -4 degrees F. as the stable temp once you get deep enough. IIRC, colder is more likely than warmer absent an active core.
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Old 12-06-2017, 03:50 PM
 
5,115 posts, read 4,719,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Best estimates appear to be around -4 degrees F. as the stable temp once you get deep enough. IIRC, colder is more likely than warmer absent an active core.
One thing about the Moon - plenty of sunlight for solar collectors. I could see a large solar array feeding battery banks, which in turn provide power to electric heaters.
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Old 12-15-2017, 11:45 PM
 
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Check this out. My friend took this photo:

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Old 12-16-2017, 08:37 AM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,204,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orogenicman View Post
Check this out. My friend took this photo:
That's an impressive photo! Where was this taken? Looks pretty massive in size. A lot bigger than the hole on the Moon. I see what appears to be a couple of people. One (on the right in the depression) might be a shadow of a person. The other is somewhat to the left on the rise in the background (by the bright light). Regardless, it looks like a very large chamber.
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