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Old 12-06-2017, 07:35 PM
 
Location: PRC
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Does anyone have any comment on the oval indentation marked by the light blue arrow please? It appears to be created after the apparent wind blown debris filled in the cracks - if that is what we are going with.
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Old 12-07-2017, 12:31 AM
 
Location: PRC
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Quote:
We can see in the link photo that the land is relatively flat. We can also see more of the flat rocks in the area. That rules out falling water and probably streams.
As you have told me numerous times, just because it looks like something does not mean it is something. Looking at flat rocks does not mean the terrain is level. What you say above does not make sense.

How can you tell the land is relatively level?

====================
As much as we would like to point to Earth examples, we need to focus on data and ACTUAL rover images of Martian examples when discussing Mars.

Where are these and how similar to others are they? There are thousands and perhaps millions of rover images now so we should be able to find these examples in that body of data - if they are there.

Unless any of you have relevent qualifications, then your opinions are as good as anyone elses. Planetry geologists should be able to come up with some Martian examples.

I have looked at thousands of rover images and my experience is that although there are many cracks in rocks, there are very few if any places where the 'weathering' effect have caused the crack to split the rock. Now, I am not perfect either, and I have not looked at all the rover images out there so I may have missed a few. I feel that the environmental conditions are pretty different to conditions here on Earth but I welcome examples from Mars which support your claims and back up your opinions.
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Old 12-26-2017, 11:33 PM
 
Location: PRC
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Strange there must be many of these old lava tubes dotted around the Martian landscape. Here's another one at the top right of this picture. It looks in very good shape after millions of years... almost as good as the other one does I posted in the original post of this thread. See the comparison below. The only thing is... it does not look as if it is located in the kind of place where you would think there would be a lava tube in a rock field on the side of a hill.

lava tube No 1 (link)



Lava tube No 2 (link)
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Old 12-27-2017, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Holly Springs, NC
1,427 posts, read 809,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
I was wondering about the scale of the mud flow in the image. Since its already been pointed out that the rover is casting a shadow, it appears that the mud flow is about a foot or less in length. That's using the size of a rover wheel for comparison purposes - the round shadow is being cast by the wheel.

If it is a mud flow, then its a very small one. And I'd opine that it's more likely just some martian dirt that was kicked up by the rover's wheel.
I agree.

If I had to guess (and let's face it this is 100% a guess) it appears that the rover's wheels lost traction and slid to the side when it went over that rock. Particularly where it looks like tire tracks are leading right up to that rock.

If we were looking at a radius of miles, then I could get the "mud flow" reference, but we're looking at inches here.
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Old 12-27-2017, 09:24 PM
 
Location: PRC
3,250 posts, read 3,365,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf
I was wondering about the scale of the mud flow in the image. Since its already been pointed out that the rover is casting a shadow, it appears that the mud flow is about a foot or less in length. That's using the size of a rover wheel for comparison purposes - the round shadow is being cast by the wheel.

If it is a mud flow, then its a very small one. And I'd opine that it's more likely just some martian dirt that was kicked up by the rover's wheel.
What has size got to do with it. You speak as if just because this feature may be small, it is insignificant. What kind of science is that? "Some dirt kicked up by the rovers wheel" does not fit with the details in the image as this is obviously created by a flow of some kind and the indentation is obviously created AFTER the flow. Why would you opine anything which is so obviously wrong and so highly unlikely?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoSox 15 View Post
I agree.
If I had to guess (and let's face it this is 100% a guess) it appears that the rover's wheels lost traction and slid to the side when it went over that rock. Particularly where it looks like tire tracks are leading right up to that rock.

If we were looking at a radius of miles, then I could get the "mud flow" reference, but we're looking at inches here.
Of course it is a guess, but we are happy to accept the guess of those we feel are authorities in a field. I am not an authority, are you?. However, we are here to discuss and give our opinions and so, since we are all probably not authorities on this science, anything we say is going to be opinion and guess. Getting a useful comment with reasoning behind it from a NASA scientist is unlikely and not worth asking for. Until we get feet on the ground, which, in my opinion, is definitely not going to happen, we are limited to opinions. What else would you suggest?
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