U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-21-2008, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
6,715 posts, read 12,378,494 times
Reputation: 4280

Advertisements

I love it when I read about stuff like this. It's just so amazing to me. It took 7.5 billion years for the light to get here. That's just mind-boggling in so many respects.

Star explodes halfway across universe - CNN.com (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/21/exploding.star.ap/index.html - broken link)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-22-2008, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, which as I understand was once upon a time ago part of the United States of America
849 posts, read 801,590 times
Reputation: 314
Quote:
The starburst would have appeared as bright as some of the stars in the handle of the Little Dipper constellation, said Penn State University astronomer David Burrows.
That's fairly bright, considering those stars in the "big dipper" are a cluster within our arm of the Milky Way. For light to be seen at that intensity, from 7.5 billion light years away is remarkable, given that the Andromeda Galaxy is 2.5 billion LY away. That was quite a gamma ray burst!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2008, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,546 posts, read 55,485,543 times
Reputation: 32304
Interesting and frightening at the same time. Current thought is that the bursts from star deaths preclude the possibility of sentient life where stars are fairly dense, such as more towards the center of the Milky Way. The bursts essentially sterilize billions of miles, and no lifeforms can evolve fast enough to reach sentience before they are destroyed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2008, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
1,368 posts, read 6,015,832 times
Reputation: 536
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Interesting and frightening at the same time. Current thought is that the bursts from star deaths preclude the possibility of sentient life where stars are fairly dense, such as more towards the center of the Milky Way. The bursts essentially sterilize billions of miles, and no lifeforms can evolve fast enough to reach sentience before they are destroyed.
Can you translate to english please?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2008, 07:02 AM
 
Location: South Central PA
1,562 posts, read 3,932,861 times
Reputation: 361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radek View Post
Can you translate to english please?
Concentrated rays from misc events have the possibility of killing massive numbers of animals on the earth, which is one of the theories behind the death of 70% of the earths animals a few hundred million years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2008, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,118,411 times
Reputation: 24647
Better 7.5 billion than 7.5 million! The universe is a rough place and so is good old planet earth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2008, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
270 posts, read 1,151,646 times
Reputation: 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Lombards View Post
... given that the Andromeda Galaxy is 2.5 billion LY away.
M31 in Andromeda is about 2.5 million, not billion, light-years away. It's the nearest large galaxy to ours; the nearer ones are a step down in size. This intensifies your point, though.

There was an "ordinary" supernova in M31 back in 1885, shortly before the dawn of astronomical photography. It didn't quite make it up to naked-eye brightness.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top