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Old 02-08-2018, 11:14 AM
 
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Was Apollo 17 the last mission?
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Old 02-08-2018, 11:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SailCT View Post
Was Apollo 17 the last mission?
The reason given by NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI ) Interim Director David Morrison in 2007 is as follows;
The Apollo Moon program was stopped by the U.S. Congress after the Apollo 17 mission. NASA’s total budget was cut and the remaining program of human flights was redirected toward the less expensive Apollo-Soyus joint flight with the USSR, the three Skylad missions (the first space station), and eventually the Space Shuttle and International Space Station. For information on the current NASA plans for human flights to the Moon, see the NASA Vision webpage (http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/vision/index.html).

https://sservi.nasa.gov/?question=wh...ns-to-the-moon
We wanted to beat the USSR to the moon, plant our flag, and put American footprints on the moon. Having done that and having made several missions to the moon, performing some scientific experiments and bringing back rocks and soil samples, Congress opted for less expensive space related missions.

We will go back to the moon, and eventually (hopefully within my lifetime, I'm 64) we will send men to Mars.

Last edited by Mike555; 02-08-2018 at 11:55 AM..
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Old 02-08-2018, 01:00 PM
 
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There was no economic reason for private industry yet. I hope there is now.
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Old 02-08-2018, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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The question to ask is "why did we go in the first place?" We went so that we could have a technological advantage over the soviets, develop rockets that would be able to carry huge bombs, pressure their economic system to try to compete with us (thus taking money away from other projects they had), increase the reasons for kids to get proper educations, give huge amounts of money to military contractors, and have bragging rights.

The act of walking on the moon was merely a symbolic touchstone, much as the first expeditions to the arctic and Antarctica or Mt. Everest. Once accomplished, the costs of continuing trips over-rode any additional benefits. Low Earth orbit is achieved much more inexpensively and provides similar conditions for science.
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Old 02-08-2018, 02:03 PM
 
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The revelation that humans can't survive in space for long duration due to the human skeleton wasting away without gravity's pull is a real show stopper!
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Old 02-08-2018, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Herndon, VA
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It's dangerous (people died trying to get there) and expensive. What good reason would we have for going back? The biggest reason we went to begin with was to beat the Soviets. Mission accomplished.
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Old 02-08-2018, 04:14 PM
 
7,168 posts, read 3,920,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
The question to ask is "why did we go in the first place?" We went so that we could have a technological advantage over the soviets, develop rockets that would be able to carry huge bombs, pressure their economic system to try to compete with us (thus taking money away from other projects they had), increase the reasons for kids to get proper educations, give huge amounts of money to military contractors, and have bragging rights.

The act of walking on the moon was merely a symbolic touchstone, much as the first expeditions to the arctic and Antarctica or Mt. Everest. Once accomplished, the costs of continuing trips over-rode any additional benefits. Low Earth orbit is achieved much more inexpensively and provides similar conditions for science.
I disagree somewhat with the “develop rockets that would be able to carry huge bombs”.

The reason the Soviets were further along with large boosters is that their nuclear weapons were larger than those in the US at the same yield. By the time the need for bigger boosters came about in the US the miniaturization meant they weren’t needed.

Saturn V was scaled up from the Jupiter, which initially was no bigger than the Redstone, and by the time they were underway it was for manned flight, not ICBMs.
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Old 02-08-2018, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retired in Illinois View Post
The revelation that humans can't survive in space for long duration due to the human skeleton wasting away without gravity's pull is a real show stopper!
This isn't something that NASA has stopped trying to solve. There have been studies, some using fish, to determine the cause(s) of bone loss in zero-g environments. If the culprit is mitochondrial dysfunction, then the appropriate treatment will be developed.
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Old 02-08-2018, 06:57 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,270 posts, read 936,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
I disagree somewhat with the “develop rockets that would be able to carry huge bombs”.

The reason the Soviets were further along with large boosters is that their nuclear weapons were larger than those in the US at the same yield. By the time the need for bigger boosters came about in the US the miniaturization meant they weren’t needed.

Saturn V was scaled up from the Jupiter, which initially was no bigger than the Redstone, and by the time they were underway it was for manned flight, not ICBMs.
Pretty much.

The Saturn V was capable of putting over 150 tons into LEO. Even the early fusion bombs (such as the Mark 17) clocked in at far less than that - about 20 tons. And this was long before anyone was MIRVing ICBMS. Also, the Mark 17 was phased out of service in favor of such weapons as the Mark 15, which weighed less than 4 tons, well before development of the Saturn V even began. So the United States never needed anything remotely approaching the massive payload capability of the Saturn V.
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Old 02-08-2018, 07:17 PM
 
1,096 posts, read 504,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
This isn't something that NASA has stopped trying to solve. There have been studies, some using fish, to determine the cause(s) of bone loss in zero-g environments. If the culprit is mitochondrial dysfunction, then the appropriate treatment will be developed.
In the way of things.....If we solve the bone loss problem, and no other body issues crop up, then the rest of "how to travel in space" will solve themselves rather quickly i'm sure.
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