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Old 04-08-2018, 08:47 AM
Status: "optimistic" (set 3 hours ago)
 
Location: Macon, Georgia
601 posts, read 262,680 times
Reputation: 368

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I always thought that the Milky Way and other galaxies were giant black hole. Different...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...8df_story.html
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:52 AM
 
22,794 posts, read 17,268,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the tiger View Post
I always thought that the Milky Way and other galaxies were giant black hole. Different...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...8df_story.html
The Washingtonpost article wrongly states that the earth is 3,000 lights years from the center of the galaxy. Earth is actually thought to be about 25,000 to 27,000 light years from the center of the Milky Way.
1.)''Our Solar System is located in the middle of this galactic disk. And by the middle, I mean the center of the galaxy is about 27,000 light years that way, and the edge of the galaxy is about the same distance that way.''

https://phys.org/news/2014-02-earth-galaxy.html#jCp


2.) ''The Solar System (and Earth) is located about 25,000 light-years to the galactic center and 25,000 light-years away from the rim. So basically, if you were to think of the Milky Way as a big record, we would be the spot that’s roughly halfway between the center and the edge.''

https://www.universetoday.com/65601/...the-milky-way/
But yes, astrophysicists have discovered what appears to be a number of smaller black holes in orbit around the giant black hole (Sagittarius A*) at the center of the galaxy. Here's another article about the discovery.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0404133532.htm


You said, ''I always thought that the Milky Way and other galaxies were giant black hole. Different...'' Could you clarify that statement?

Last edited by Mike555; 04-08-2018 at 10:57 AM..
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Old 04-10-2018, 06:46 PM
 
2,960 posts, read 1,127,390 times
Reputation: 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike555 View Post
The Washingtonpost article wrongly states that the earth is 3,000 lights years from the center of the galaxy. Earth is actually thought to be about 25,000 to 27,000 light years from the center of the Milky Way.
1.)''Our Solar System is located in the middle of this galactic disk. And by the middle, I mean the center of the galaxy is about 27,000 light years that way, and the edge of the galaxy is about the same distance that way.''

https://phys.org/news/2014-02-earth-galaxy.html#jCp


2.) ''The Solar System (and Earth) is located about 25,000 light-years to the galactic center and 25,000 light-years away from the rim. So basically, if you were to think of the Milky Way as a big record, we would be the spot that’s roughly halfway between the center and the edge.''

https://www.universetoday.com/65601/...the-milky-way/
But yes, astrophysicists have discovered what appears to be a number of smaller black holes in orbit around the giant black hole (Sagittarius A*) at the center of the galaxy. Here's another article about the discovery.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0404133532.htm


You said, ''I always thought that the Milky Way and other galaxies were giant black hole. Different...'' Could you clarify that statement?
I think what the poster meant to say was that there are giant black holes in the center of each galaxy.
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Old 04-15-2018, 05:15 PM
 
1,675 posts, read 2,563,870 times
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Indeed, there is what's known as a supermassive black hole in the galaxy core. We have yet to directly see the black hole but we have directly observed the plethora of stars orbiting it.

Considering the sheer number of stars in the galaxy core, it would stand to reason that there would be other black holes -remnants of giant, ancient stars also in orbit.

When the James Webb Space Telescope launches in 2020 (hopefully -it's been delayed a few times so who knows), one of the first things on the agenda for it is to point it in the direction of Sagittarius A (the galaxy core) and get our first real photograph of it. The JWST uses the infrared spectrum to cut through the gas and dust that obscures our view of the core and it will also orbit the Sun (not the Earth) out near the 2nd Lagrange point past the moon. That combined with its sunshield, should allow it to get some stunning data.
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Old 04-15-2018, 10:22 PM
 
22,794 posts, read 17,268,975 times
Reputation: 9512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adric View Post
Indeed, there is what's known as a supermassive black hole in the galaxy core. We have yet to directly see the black hole but we have directly observed the plethora of stars orbiting it.

Considering the sheer number of stars in the galaxy core, it would stand to reason that there would be other black holes -remnants of giant, ancient stars also in orbit.

When the James Webb Space Telescope launches in 2020 (hopefully -it's been delayed a few times so who knows), one of the first things on the agenda for it is to point it in the direction of Sagittarius A (the galaxy core) and get our first real photograph of it. The JWST uses the infrared spectrum to cut through the gas and dust that obscures our view of the core and it will also orbit the Sun (not the Earth) out near the 2nd Lagrange point past the moon. That combined with its sunshield, should allow it to get some stunning data.
I hope that the launch of the James Webb Telescope doesn't get delayed past May 2020. The delays are understandable though. They need to make sure that once it's in position everything works the way it's supposed to because once it's at L2 which is about 1 million miles from earth we can't currently send any repair crews to fix problems.

I think some exciting discoveries are going to be made once it's operational.
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Old 04-20-2018, 01:10 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,446 posts, read 1,058,057 times
Reputation: 897
May the Lord bless and keep Black Holes far away from me.

35,000 light years is about reasonable.
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