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Old 10-03-2018, 06:18 PM
 
632 posts, read 490,102 times
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Data from the Kepler telescope indicate signs of a Neptune sized moon orbiting a world 3 times the size of Jupiter 8,000 light years away. The planet is in the stars habitable zone and the size ratio between the planet and moon is very similar to that of earth and our moon. Both objects are qas giants and not themselves habitable. The star Kepler-1625 is similar to our sun but it is 10 billion years old and is much hotter due to age.



https://www.space.com/42008-first-ex...ler-1625b.html

Last edited by TheArchitect; 10-03-2018 at 06:32 PM..
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Old 10-03-2018, 08:52 PM
 
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I am glad they are looking for planets with a moon. This is important because our moon makes life on earth possible. Without the moon, earth would not have a stable weather system and a magnetic shield to protect us from radiations.

Because the planets observed are so far way, any information really comes from educated guesses until we can get a much closer look.
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Old 10-11-2018, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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As with this instance, astronomers are more likely to find the extreme cases first. Finding Earth-sized moons in a goldilocks zone will require better instruments.
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:05 PM
 
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It was a very lucky find, and was detected by the transit method (dips in the brightness of the star) as the planet and moon crossed in front of the star. Even the planet itself was only detected by the transit method. There may be many more around in the galaxy, but undetectable because the orbits don't cross in front of the host star, so there's not enough light reflected off the planets and moons to observe them directly. Perhaps in the future with much more powerful equipment, it might be possible to make a direct observation and possibly determine the composition of the atmosphere. Even then it would still look mostly like a speck of light.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sZG95xOtYrg
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Ohio
20,681 posts, read 14,654,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
I am glad they are looking for planets with a moon. This is important because our moon makes life on earth possible. Without the moon, earth would not have a stable weather system and a magnetic shield to protect us from radiations.
Um, the Earth generates its own magnetosphere. Venus does not have a magnetosphere, but not because it has no moons, rather because it has no molten metal core that rotates on its own, and because the axial rotation of Venus is 243 days, and not 24 hours like Earth or 16 to 18 hours like other planets in our solar system.

Also, the Moon has little affect on weather. Weather is a function of atmosphere pressure, and the Moon has no effect on it. The Moon's only effect is on tides.

If you have an high school diploma, you should seriously consider giving it back.
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Old 10-11-2018, 07:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Um, the Earth generates its own magnetosphere. Venus does not have a magnetosphere, but not because it has no moons, rather because it has no molten metal core that rotates on its own, and because the axial rotation of Venus is 243 days, and not 24 hours like Earth or 16 to 18 hours like other planets in our solar system.

Also, the Moon has little affect on weather. Weather is a function of atmosphere pressure, and the Moon has no effect on it. The Moon's only effect is on tides.

If you have an high school diploma, you should seriously consider giving it back.
The earth-moon collision was responsible for the earth's tilt that maintains the stable weather system which allows life to flourish.

https://www.inverse.com/article/2306...tory-axis-tilt

Gravitational pull of the moon affects more than just tides on earth. It helps maintaining earth's magnetic field.

http://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/ne...rths-magnetism


Don't be a d*ck.
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Old 10-11-2018, 09:55 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,270 posts, read 934,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
The earth-moon collision was responsible for the earth's tilt that maintains the stable weather system which allows life to flourish.
Well, the Moon itself - which exists only because of that collision - is responsible for the stability of the axial tilt, a stability which certainly enchances the long-term flourishing of life. But you're more right than she is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
Don't be a d*ck.
That's what Mircea does.
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