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Old 12-12-2018, 06:38 PM
 
33,821 posts, read 17,312,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
That kind of reminds me of when I worked down on the ice in Antarctica. I never made it to South Pole Station, but I did make it to McMurdo, which has one huge tankership bring down fuel once a year in the summer.

But for South Pole, up until 8 or 9 years ago, when they started the South Pole Traverse where they drag huge double lined bladders full of fuel on sleds over two weeks from Mactown, up onto the Antarctic Plateau and the South Pole, they had to fly all the fuel in on LC-130's, the largest planes that can land at Pole because they have skis.

They still do it, but not as much, and call them sleigh rides and fly fuel from Mactown to Pole, no cargo and limited people on board. So they burn fuel to fly there and back to deliver whatever fuel is left over!
Same sort of problem, in a very real sense.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Seattle
2,396 posts, read 506,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
For any nut thinking we can see things on the moon through a telescope, to resolve the Apollo 16 flag (4 feet in length) you would need a telescope 650 feet in diameter. 20x larger than the largest optical mirror we have today.

Are there telescopes that can see the flag and lunar rover on the Moon? (Beginner) - Curious About Astronomy? Ask an Astronomer

Hubble can’t resolve anything smaller than 280 feet across.

True, but a smaller telescope may be able to pick up the projected shadow of the flag and LEM across the surface.
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Old 12-14-2018, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
they will likely still be building a moon base, but it will be located on the dark side so as to avoid unwanted scrutiny
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmaxwell View Post
Unwanted scrutiny from who? Anyone with the ability to observe a moon base on the lighted side would have the resources to monitor the other side as well.
Just in the interest of accuracy: There's no such thing as a dark and lighted side of the Moon. There's a side facing us - tidal lock rotation - but the Moon has night and day like the Earth, although each is approximately 2 weeks.
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Old 12-18-2018, 10:40 PM
 
Location: PRC
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Quote:
...There's a side facing us - tidal lock rotation - but the Moon has night and day like the Earth, although each is approximately 2 weeks.
Yes, do we know why some moons are like this, with only one side facing the main direction. I believe there are a couple of moons in our solar system which have the same feature, aren't there?.

Has science come up with an explanation for tidal lock rotation yet?
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Old 12-20-2018, 02:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ocpaul20 View Post
Has science come up with an explanation for tidal lock rotation yet?
Newtonian physics.
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Old 12-21-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Seattle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocpaul20 View Post
Yes, do we know why some moons are like this, with only one side facing the main direction. I believe there are a couple of moons in our solar system which have the same feature, aren't there?.

Has science come up with an explanation for tidal lock rotation yet?

Yes. Tidal forces slightly distort the shape of an orbiting body, resulting in a tiny bulge. If the body (Moon) is rotating with respect to the pulling object (Earth), the bulge doesn't immediately relax when it rotates away. The gravity of the Earth continues to give a slight extra tug to the bulge because it's a little closer, retarding the rotation. Eventually, the body (Moon) reaches a rotation rate where the tug is in equilibrium over the course of an orbit -- tidal locking. This will happen to the Earth too, eventually.
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