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Old 12-21-2018, 09:36 PM
 
1,675 posts, read 2,562,583 times
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Just when you think you got to know your stellar neighbors....

Quote:
Say hello to 2018 VG18, the most distant solar system object ever spotted. Nicknamed “Farout,” it’s about 120 to 130 astronomical units (AU) from the sun (where one AU is equal to the 93 million miles between the star and our home planet, because humans are self-referential like that). For reference, Pluto—commonly introduced to students as one of the most distant planetary objects in the solar system—is a measly 34 AU away, hardly scratching our cosmic neighborhood’s outer fringes. 2018 VG18 also beats out Eris, the dwarf planet infamous for inspiring Pluto’s status demotion, which previously held the record at 96 AU from the sun.
Meet Farout, the new most distant member of our solar system - Popular Science


Some facts about Farout:
  • It's pinkish in hue. Common for icy planets.
  • Solid.
  • 120-130 AU distance from Sol.
  • 500-600 km in diameter.
  • Takes more than 1,000 years to orbit the sun.
  • Discovered November 10 2018, Japanese Subaru 8-meter telescope - Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

Farout is roughly the same distance from Sol as Voyager 2.
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Old 12-24-2018, 06:58 AM
 
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This is great news. There are a number of dwarf planet candidates in the Kuiper Belt. Here’s hoping more get added soon. At 5-600km, it is on the smaller end of the scale.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Michigan
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They found V'GER?
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:35 AM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,204,697 times
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Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
This is great news. There are a number of dwarf planet candidates in the Kuiper Belt. Here’s hoping more get added soon. At 5-600km, it is on the smaller end of the scale.
Agreed, it's an impressive discovery. The total area of the Kuiper Belt is incredibly vast. There could be a much larger number of as yet undiscovered dwarf planet sized objects located in the Belt. It's also possible there could be some much larger planet sized objects out there as well. There's a lot of stuff in the Kuiper Belt.
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Old 12-24-2018, 11:37 AM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,204,697 times
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Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
They found V'GER?
I think V'GER has left the building.
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Old 12-24-2018, 01:38 PM
 
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We know there is a large collection of debris left over after the creation of the solar system. The debris vary in sizes. If you point the telescope in the right direction and wait long enough, you are bound to see one or more.
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Old 12-24-2018, 07:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Agreed, it's an impressive discovery. The total area of the Kuiper Belt is incredibly vast. There could be a much larger number of as yet undiscovered dwarf planet sized objects located in the Belt. It's also possible there could be some much larger planet sized objects out there as well. There's a lot of stuff in the Kuiper Belt.
According to some estimates there could be well over 10000 dwarf planets in the Kuiper Belt. There are already hundreds of identified objects in the region, but the available data is too minimal to lead to a conclusive categorization.
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Old 12-24-2018, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Michigan
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Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I think V'GER has left the building.
Well, 3 months ago they found the planet Vulcan in the 40 Eridani A star system. Right where Gene Roddenberry said it would be. We are now only 45 years away until Vulcan survey ship the T'Plana-Hath lands in Boseman Montana..

I won't likely live to see it, but here's hoping!

p.s. Shades of Doctor Who, I just noticed the OP's posting name is Adric!
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Old 12-25-2018, 09:05 AM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,204,697 times
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Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
Well, 3 months ago they found the planet Vulcan in the 40 Eridani A star system. Right where Gene Roddenberry said it would be. We are now only 45 years away until Vulcan survey ship the T'Plana-Hath lands in Boseman Montana..

I won't likely live to see it, but here's hoping!

p.s. Shades of Doctor Who, I just noticed the OP's posting name is Adric!
Also known as Kepler-10b. It might be a earth-sized rocky planet (tidally locked), but with its proximity being about 20 times closer to its host star than Mercury is to the Sun, even Spock would have a difficult time living there with a surface temperature hot enough to melt iron. 😎
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Old 12-28-2018, 03:29 PM
 
1,675 posts, read 2,562,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
Well, 3 months ago they found the planet Vulcan in the 40 Eridani A star system. Right where Gene Roddenberry said it would be. We are now only 45 years away until Vulcan survey ship the T'Plana-Hath lands in Boseman Montana..

I won't likely live to see it, but here's hoping!

p.s. Shades of Doctor Who, I just noticed the OP's posting name is Adric!
I think only one other poster has ever noticed that in all my years on CD.

I wouldn’t be surprised if there is indeed another undiscovered massive/Jovian style planet out near or in the Kuiper Belt. A lot of astronomers and physicists seem to think so too. Right now, it’s just being dubbed “Planet Nine” but its gravitational influence would explain a lot of things including the tilt of our sun and the subtle wobble of our solar system.

Like trying to find a needle in a cosmic haystack.
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