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Old 04-02-2019, 05:20 PM
 
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Hopefully this happens. I always enjoy a great scientific discovery:

The announcement, which we believe will be the release of the first-ever images of an actual black hole, is an incredibly big deal. It’s so big, in fact, that astronomers will be holding six individual press conferences to present the research in multiple countries around the world, from Belgium to Tokyo to Washington D.C., and “extensive supporting audiovisual material” will be released at the same time.

The work was made possible by a network of telescopes around the world that collectively make up what is called the Event Horizon Telescope. The idea is that by combining the power of telescope positioned at different places on the planet, the team creates what is basically a virtual “Earth-sized” telescope capable of peering far deeper into the solar system than ever before.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/probably-...172746558.html
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Old 04-02-2019, 08:09 PM
 
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That would be cool to see the actual event horizon and light being bent!
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Old 04-02-2019, 09:14 PM
 
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Somehow I doubt it. I don't recall we are able to capture an image of any celestial body in another solar system, from our ground based telescopes. All we have so far are artist renderings of scientists' interpretations of collected photons (light). Black holes are much much farther away than our neighboring stars.
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Old 04-02-2019, 10:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
Somehow I doubt it. I don't recall we are able to capture an image of any celestial body in another solar system, from our ground based telescopes. All we have so far are artist renderings of scientists' interpretations of collected photons (light). Black holes are much much farther away than our neighboring stars.
Not with any one telescope. But using a large enough collective of telescopes you might be able to do it.
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Old 04-03-2019, 01:07 PM
 
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The thing is, is that by its very definition a black hole itself (the singularity at the core inside the event horizon) can't be directly observed since light can't escape from one because of the intense gravity. But black holes have been indirectly observed, or at least inferred by the effect that a black hole has on nearby objects. Also, as matter is sucked into a black hole, it heats up and emits radiation which can be observed. Matter being ejected from the region near a black hole can produce radio jets which are also observable.

In principle though, the event horizon around a black hole can be seen. Possibly that is what the announcement will be about. And that would certainly be exciting.
'Groundbreaking Result' Coming from Black-Hole Hunting Event Horizon Telescope Next Week

By Mike Wall a day ago Science & Astronomy

''The advisory doesn't state what the April 10 announcement will be, but the above information suggests it's a pretty big deal.

If you want to try to connect some dots, here's some basic information about the EHT. The project links up radio dishes around the globe, creating a virtual telescope about the size of Earth. The goal is to generate enough magnifying power to image the area around a black hole, especially its event horizon — the point beyond which nothing, not even light, can escape. (Directly imaging the black hole itself — the part inside the event horizon — from our perspective is, of course, impossible; there are no photons from that exotic realm to catch.)''

https://www.space.com/event-horizon-...ming-soon.html
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Old 04-04-2019, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Mars City
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They are not of typical visual phenomenon. "Seeing" them is not like viewing all other deep space objects (planets, stars, comets, nebulae, galaxies, etc.) Some objects can't be seen photographically. It's dumb to treat black holes the same as the others. And no, pooling resources of telescopes will not overcome this reality.

Some group is obviously seeking attention and PR, and people are taking the bait.
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
They are not of typical visual phenomenon. "Seeing" them is not like viewing all other deep space objects (planets, stars, comets, nebulae, galaxies, etc.) Some objects can't be seen photographically. It's dumb to treat black holes the same as the others. And no, pooling resources of telescopes will not overcome this reality.

Some group is obviously seeking attention and PR, and people are taking the bait.
I found this on the interwebs, but the European Commission and European Research Council are pretty real organizations, I can't see them holding a press conference to perpetuate a hoax. Now will the imagine live up to the hype, maybe, maybe not!

On April 10 at 3 p.m. CEST (7 a.m. MST), the European Commission, European Research Council and the Event Horizon Telescope project will hold a press conference to introduce a “groundbreaking result” from the EHT.

The EHT project is an international collaboration aimed at capturing the first photograph of a black hole, and it is supposed that scientists at the press conference will unveil a photo of “Sagittarius A,” a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy.

Sagittarius A is about 4 million times the mass of the sun and is 26,000 light-years away from Earth, according to NASA. It is one of the few black holes in the universe with a flow of nearby matter that can be witnessed by humans.

Black holes are collapsed stars or compressed mass with a pulling force of gravity so strong that light is not able to escape, rendering them all but invisible, according to NASA.

However, the “event horizon” of a black hole — the point outside of a black hole where light can’t achieve escape velocity — is theoretically possible to photograph, and it’s very likely that is what will be shown at the conference next week, according to USA Today.
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:58 PM
 
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Default EHT: A Planetary Effort to Photograph a Black Hole

In this hour long presentation by members of the EHT (Event Horizon Telescope) project, the speakers describe how imaging a black hole is done.

Basically, an attempt is made to see the shadow of a black hole that is cast on surrounding matter, revealing the shape of space-time.

https://eventhorizontelescope.org/bl...aph-black-hole

Speakers:

Sheperd Doeleman, EHT Project Director, Senior Astronomer, Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian
Dimitrios Psaltis, EHT Project Scientist, Professor of Astronomy and Physics, University of Arizona
Sera Markoff, Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics and Astroparticle Physics, University of Amsterdam (organizer)
Peter Galison, Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, Harvard University
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Old 04-05-2019, 11:06 PM
 
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Default How Do You Observe a Black Hole? w/Shep Doeleman and Andrea Ghez

In this World Science Festival from 2018, hosted by Brian Greene, he interviews Shep Doeleman and Andrea Ghez. Dr. Ghez is one of the worlds leading experts in observational astrophysics. She heads UCLA's Galactic Center Group which researches the innermost regions of the Milky Way. Sheperd Doeleman is EHT Project Director, Senior Astronomer, Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian.

Dr. Doeleman at 29:49 stated that the data crunching should be completed and the data released in the first part of 2019, which as we know, is just a few days away. He goes into some detail about how they go about attempting to image the silhouette of a black hole. A very interesting discussion. And it's fun listening to Andrea Ghez. She's so excited and animated talking about her work.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-OyMPAq2PU
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Old 04-06-2019, 08:45 AM
 
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Simulated view of a black hole. Credit: Bronzwaer/Davelaar/Moscibrodzka/Falcke, Radboud University
https://www.universetoday.com/141903...on-april-10th/
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