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Old 05-26-2019, 02:52 PM
 
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Or common sense.
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Old 05-26-2019, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milky Way Resident View Post
This still raises the question of what dark matter really is?
I don't buy into it. I think there are other more reasonable explanations that don't require the invention of exotic matter.

Note that this whole theory of dark matter rests with the calculated rotational speed of galaxies or clusters of galaxies and their observed rotational speed.

The "apparent" incongruity between the calculated rotational speed and the observed rotational speed leads one to believe the galaxy has more mass than meets the eye. Dark matter/dark energy allegedly explains that mass.

Some of the explanations for what might constitute dark matter/energy don't hold water, either.

I'm not seeing where some of the suggested particles like neutrinos and such would remain static. They should be moving and moving at the speed of light.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Don't they observe the space and record the observations 24/7
You would think they should notice it the second it happened...
No, they're only able to see a teeny-tiny small section of space.

That's the problem with the Nemesis Theory, that the Sun has a Brown Dwarf twin.

Assuming you could determine the barycenter of the Sun/Brown Dwarf system, and then assuming the Brown Dwarf is exactly opposite Sun and not any oblique angle in relation to Sun, meaning its orbital speed doesn't cause it to be slightly ahead or behind the point of opposition, and assuming the Brown Dwarf is in the same plane of the ecliptic as Sun and not above or below that plane of the ecliptic, and assuming the Brown Dwarf is roughly the same mass as Sun, so you can approximate its distance from the barycenter, you'd have to stare at a teeny-tiny small section of space for some time in the hope that you guessed right and the Brown Dwarf is actually there in that small space, and then hope that the Brown Dwarf passes in front of a star or galaxy and blocks the light, or perhaps bends the light from a star/galaxy.

That is a daunting task.

Anyway, to get an idea of what they can see, take the Kepler telescope launched into space.

Hold your arm out and make a fist. That fist is all Kepler could see, and that's what, maybe 1% to 3% of Space, and I'm probably over-estimating. It's probably actually less than 1% of the total area of Space.

Hubble, Kepler and Webb are the most powerful telescopes, and they're out in Space. Telescopes on Earth only see a fraction of what they can see, and they're not seeing a lot.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Pretty sure you have no understanding of spherical geometry.
If that assumption makes you feel better then great.
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Old 06-04-2019, 02:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Oh, I read the abstract and other info available on the net. Still - there are astronomers (incl. hobby astronomers) that are observing the visible parts of the Space pretty much all the times. They use many different types of telescopes to observe objects in the Universe. Some are located right here on earth and some are sent into space. In fact, a large number of observatories have been launched into orbit.
You would think they have the round of the hour observations covered.



In other words, this event occurred a very long time ago but was just discovered lately...
The news headlines made it sound like this just happened.

Maybe they - whoever 'they' are - were hoping we wouldn't notice and start a rumor like --- hmmm, never mind. My mind is going SciFi.
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Old 06-08-2019, 06:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Don't they observe the space and record the observations 24/7
You would think they should notice it the second it happened...
Detailed coverage of the entire sky is simply not possible. There are not enough telescopes and manpower to even cover the whole sky even at low power. Most objects are very so far away that very large telescopes using high power to observe them. Even then the field observed is on the order of 1 second in diameter. Calculating how many of these fields are in the sky I find that there are 518,400,000,000 square seconds in sky. As you can see even using all the telescopes available you can only cover a small fraction of the sky at one time.

Also, one thing that everyone has missed is the information has not yet been submitted to a peer reviewed publication i.e. professional science journal. There it would open to comments from other scientists as the validity of its claims.
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