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Old 06-10-2019, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Self explanatory
12,458 posts, read 5,287,896 times
Reputation: 16351

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https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-t...acuum-testing/

Quote:
The long-delayed James Webb telescope is finally moving toward completion. The telescope recently passed a round of testing ahead of its planned launch in 2021...

The telescope itself already went through vacuum testing last year at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. But now the other half of the project, the spacecraft element, has passed its testing at Northrop Grumman as well.

The spacecraft element consists of a “bus,” which is the part that flies the telescope into place, and the unique sunshield that will protect the telescope’s delicate circuitry from the heat of the Sun. The sunshield is made up of five layers and spans the size of a tennis court, and is designed to ensure the telescope instruments are kept at the low temperatures required for successful operation.

Now both parts of the craft have gone through vacuum testing, the next challenge is for the engineers to join the two parts together. Then a final round of testing can begin, making sure that every part is ready for its big launch. When it launches, it will be the world’s most powerful telescope and will be the successor to the beloved Hubble telescope. It should be able to collect images at a higher resolution and sensitivity, observing some of the most distant objects in the universe.
Great news, despite all the setbacks.

I can't wait to see what images this telescope will produce.
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Old 06-10-2019, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Seattle
2,298 posts, read 490,180 times
Reputation: 2134
That boondoggle is finally ready for launch, eh?
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,815 posts, read 1,395,419 times
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I’m so excited for this telescope! I mean, I need some answers because I feel like I’m getting old and need some answers before I pass in this lifetime!
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:35 PM
 
4,256 posts, read 8,013,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HouseBuilder328 View Post
I’m so excited for this telescope! I mean, I need some answers because I feel like I’m getting old and need some answers before I pass in this lifetime!
Me too, but I am more excited about the technical challenge of building and launching this telescope than I am about what it can reveal. I need answers about:

1. Dark matter.

2. Dark energy

3. What happened before the Big Bang?

4. If there are earth-like planets teaming with technological life

5. What is the nature of black holes?


I don't think this telescope will provide answers to my curiosity.
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Old 06-11-2019, 02:48 AM
 
834 posts, read 809,805 times
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My only concern will be the reliability of its hardware. Its final location will be at Earth's L2 point 930,000 miles away. If anything ever goes wrong with it there is no hope of a repair mission. Note being at the Earth's L2 point places the Earth directly between the James Web telescope and the Sun all the time.

Sun <---93,000,000 miles ---> Earth <---930,000 miles ---> James Web telescope
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Old 08-30-2019, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Seattle
2,298 posts, read 490,180 times
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The telescope assembly is finally complete:
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/08/2...in-california/
More testing to come.

Current expected cost at launch: $10 billion. Hubble cost $4.7 billion at launch, so JWST is roughly double. For comparison, the OWL 100-m telescope is estimated to cost $1.3 billion. Hope it's worth it.
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Maryland
2,166 posts, read 731,481 times
Reputation: 4834
Quote:
Originally Posted by HouseBuilder328 View Post
I’m so excited for this telescope! I mean, I need some answers because I feel like I’m getting old and need some answers before I pass in this lifetime!
I feel the same way. I’m 71 and the last real revolution I saw was the digital revolution. I would like to see something else truly revolutionary before I check out, mastery of our own biology, “sentient” AI, a revolutionary deeper understanding of our universe. For the latter, I often fear we’re are possibly faced with brute facts of existence that make no sense to us at all.
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Old 09-01-2019, 02:33 PM
 
28,611 posts, read 40,594,929 times
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While we are waiting for all that I'd like to children go to school without being killed.
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Old 09-01-2019, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Maryland
2,166 posts, read 731,481 times
Reputation: 4834
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
While we are waiting for all that I'd like to children go to school without being killed.
It happens by the millions every day. And what, pray tell, does your comment have to do with the topic of this thread?
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Old 10-10-2019, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,815 posts, read 1,395,419 times
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We will be able to see into the center of our Milky Way Galaxy!

https://www.newsweek.com/heart-milky...d-nasa-1464347




"However, this will soon change, NASA has said. The JWST, which is currently scheduled for launch in 2021, will be able to peer through the dust and send back images of the heart of the Milky Way in "unprecedented detail," the space agency said in a statement. Often, the JWST is referred to as NASA's alien hunting telescope, as its instruments on board will be able to detect biosignatures coming from planets beyond our solar system. This will allow scientists to focus in on planets that may support life—potentially answering one of the most fundamental questions in the universe: are we alone?"
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