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Old 08-01-2019, 05:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Cool. But they said that the planet is 31 light years away. They said "only" 31 light years.
So I was looking it up, that is about 300 trillion kilometers. How long would it take to physically get there like with a capsule? A Boeing/Airbus would take millions of years if I did the math right. Is there any significantly faster way to get there?

Not with current technology, or probably more accurately, not known with current technology. Solar Sails show promise, there are theories on other methods of travel such as Dyson's Orion drive, which.. Technically should work, in theory.

But Voyager 1 is the fastest spaceship we have built. it's traveling at 17.043 km/s and is currently something like 19 light hours from Earth after 42 years.. To travel 1 light year will take about 17,500 years. So, to go 31 light years.. Over half a billion years.

Even getting to 10% the speed of light, which is the holy grail.. It would still take 44 years to get to Alpha Centauri, which is the nearest star at 4.4 light years. So, to get 31 light years, you're looking at, ballpark, 8 times as long, or ~350 years.


The only way we get there, in reality, within a lifetime, and back.. Would be FTL. And then you run into the problem where ok, you might get there in 2 years or so from your perspective, but 200 years have passed on Earth. I'm no expert on Einstein's theory here, so, this part my numbers may be way off.
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Old 08-02-2019, 10:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Cool. But they said that the planet is 31 light years away. They said "only" 31 light years.
So I was looking it up, that is about 300 trillion kilometers. How long would it take to physically get there like with a capsule? A Boeing/Airbus would take millions of years if I did the math right. Is there any significantly faster way to get there?

Amplifying the gravity A wave ?
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Old 08-18-2019, 01:41 PM
 
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This video explains the disconnect between what scientists think of "habitable" and what the public think.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Q_0vOdzw4Y
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Old 08-18-2019, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Here
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Cool. But they said that the planet is 31 light years away. They said "only" 31 light years.
They did so because that is extremely close.

The Milky Way galaxy has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years. In other words, 31 light-years is a fraction of 1/10th of 1% the span of the galaxy. It's roughly the equivalent of another American living less than a mile from you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
So I was looking it up, that is about 300 trillion kilometers. How long would it take to physically get there like with a capsule? A Boeing/Airbus would take millions of years if I did the math right. Is there any significantly faster way to get there?
Airplanes - Boeings, Airbuses - are incapable of spaceflight.

The fastest spacecraft ever launched will be the Parker Solar Probe, which by the year 2025 will reach a velocity of 0.064% (or, 1/1563rd) the speed of light. At that velocity, it would take a spacecraft over 48,000 years to travel 31 light-years.

But it would be premature to consider sending a probe there. There are more than 600 stellar objects within 31 light-years of Earth. More suitable targets for exploration will undoubtedly be discovered long before practical interstellar probe technology becomes available and politically/financially feasible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I think I read some time ago that the Moon might actually be a former part of the Earth that got split off in a catastrophic event.
The most widely accepted model of the Moon's creation is that a large object (perhaps the size of Mars) impacted the early Earth, and that the Moon was formed out of the combined material from that object and Earth, and that the reformed Earth also comprised material from both objects - the impactor and the proto-Earth.
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Old 08-18-2019, 02:00 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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He got a talent for explaining things
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Old 08-18-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
They did so because that is extremely close.

The Milky Way galaxy has a diameter of over 150,000 light-years. In other words, 31 light-years is a fraction of 1/10th of 1% the span of the galaxy. It's roughly the equivalent of another American living less than a mile from you.



Airplanes - Boeings, Airbuses - are incapable of spaceflight.

The fastest spacecraft ever launched will be the Parker Solar Probe, which by the year 2025 will reach a velocity of 0.064% (or, 1/1563rd) the speed of light. At that velocity, it would take a spacecraft over 48,000 years to travel 31 light-years.

But it would be premature to consider sending a probe there. There are more than 600 stellar objects within 31 light-years of Earth. More suitable targets for exploration will undoubtedly be discovered long before practical interstellar probe technology becomes available and politically/financially feasible.



The most widely accepted model of the Moon's creation is that a large object (perhaps the size of Mars) impacted the early Earth, and that the Moon was formed out of the combined material from that object and Earth, and that the reformed Earth also comprised material from both objects - the impactor and the proto-Earth.
I know Boeing/Airbus are not made for spaceflight, I just picked such planes because it is the fastest transport that we all know from flying, i.e. we can kind of imagine how fast it is and how slow at the same time.
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Old 08-19-2019, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Martinsburg, West Virginia
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Using current technology and the speeds that would afford, figure about 19,000 years per light year of travel. Rounded off, that comes to about 600,000 years. A human generation is about 22 years, so a generational ship would take about 27,000 generations to reach a star 31 light years away using current technology.

In the grand scheme of the Milky Way, 31 light years from Sol is right next door, figuratively writing.
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Old 09-11-2019, 04:58 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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A similar news story:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49648746

But it's even farther away, probably out of physical reach forever, at least for current homo sapiens sapiens.
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Old 09-11-2019, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
A similar news story:
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49648746

But it's even farther away, probably out of physical reach forever, at least for current homo sapiens sapiens.
It doesn't matter how far away it is according to this link: https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science...ds-ncna1052486. I quote: "However, K2-18 b's large atmosphere is extremely thick and creates high-pressure conditions, which "likely prevents life as we know it from existing on the planet's surface," a news release reads." It also goes on to state: "...….such an incredibly high pressure that any Earth-created spacecraft sent there would be destroyed."

In space measurement it is not really that far away at 110 light years from Earth. Of course it would be nice if an explorer could step out and stretch their legs after they got there!
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Old 09-12-2019, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Seattle
2,396 posts, read 506,465 times
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Possibly a future target for terraforming?
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