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Old 08-01-2019, 11:57 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Cool. But they said that the planet is 31 light years away. They said "only" 31 light years.
So I was looking it up, that is about 300 trillion kilometers. How long would it take to physically get there like with a capsule? A Boeing/Airbus would take millions of years if I did the math right. Is there any significantly faster way to get there?
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Old 08-01-2019, 12:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Cool. But they said that the planet is 31 light years away. They said "only" 31 light years.
So I was looking it up, that is about 300 trillion kilometers. How long would it take to physically get there like with a capsule? A Boeing/Airbus would take millions of years if I did the math right. Is there any significantly faster way to get there?
You neglected to post a link. Here it is.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0731125430.htm

The exoplanet is more massive than our own blue planet, and Kaltenegger said the discovery will provide insight into Earth's heavyweight planetary cousins. "With a thick atmosphere, the planet GJ 357 d could maintain liquid water on its surface like Earth, and we could pick out signs of life with telescopes that will soon be online," she said.
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Old 08-01-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Ah, right, thanks.

Yes, the planet is more massive than Earth, but the sun is just like 1/3rd or so, they said.

If it really has such "friendly" conditions, isn't it likely to be inhabited already?
This could raise moral questions such as the legality of stepping on other planets, let alone colonizing them.
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Old 08-01-2019, 12:42 PM
 
7,268 posts, read 4,512,843 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Cool. But they said that the planet is 31 light years away. They said "only" 31 light years.
So I was looking it up, that is about 300 trillion kilometers. How long would it take to physically get there like with a capsule? A Boeing/Airbus would take millions of years if I did the math right. Is there any significantly faster way to get there?
Warp drive.
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Old 08-01-2019, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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According to SIMBAD, GJ 357 is an early M-type dwarf; 33% of the Sun's mass and a slow rotation rate, so hopefully not a high activity level. Metallicity is near solar. It's moving closer to us, and should come to within 23 light years in 101,000 years.
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Old 08-01-2019, 01:21 PM
 
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Too much self congratulations from the science team. Until we know more, there is nothing earth-like about this planet.
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Old 08-01-2019, 04:23 PM
 
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For GJ 357 d or any other planet to be truly earth-like there are a number of factors to take into account in addition to size, distance from its star and atmospheric composition, such as whether it has plate tectonic activity, a magnetic field, a moon to stabilize its tilt at the right angle to allow for regular seasons. Factors such as these combine to make advanced life on earth possible. Not that a planet has to be exactly like earth to have some kind of life.
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Old 08-01-2019, 04:39 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Not sure it needs a moon for seasons. Without seasons the weather might be boring, but it could still be enough to sustain life.
The magnetic field results from the iron in our planet. If another planet doesn't have it, it would be vulnerable to its sun, unless that sun is much weaker, which might be the case with this newly discovered planet.

At the end of the day, humans might simply have to adopt to rather different conditions because we are not very likely to find another planet with the same conditions as on Earth. They are very specific.
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Old 08-01-2019, 05:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
Not sure it needs a moon for seasons. Without seasons the weather might be boring, but it could still be enough to sustain life.
The magnetic field results from the iron in our planet. If another planet doesn't have it, it would be vulnerable to its sun, unless that sun is much weaker, which might be the case with this newly discovered planet.

At the end of the day, humans might simply have to adopt to rather different conditions because we are not very likely to find another planet with the same conditions as on Earth. They are very specific.
I was going from memory and thinking that the moon's stabilizing influence allowed for regular seasons. But looking into it, without the moon, the resulting instability would be an issue over time scales of millions of years, although it seems that there are differences of opinion about how important the moon is to earth.
Earth's Stabilizing Moon May Be Unique Within Universe
By Nola Taylor Redd July 29, 2011 Science & Astronomy


The moon has long been recognized as a significant stabilizer of Earth's orbital axis. Without it, astronomers have predicted that Earth's tilt could vary as much as 85 degrees. In such a scenario, the sun would swing from being directly over the equator to directly over the poles over the course of a few million years, a change which could result in dramatic climatic shifts.

https://www.space.com/12464-earth-mo...-universe.html

On the other hand;
The Moon has long been viewed as a crucial component in creating an environment suitable for the evolution of complex life on Earth, but a number of scientific results in recent years have shown that perhaps our planet doesn't need the Moon as much as we have thought.


https://phys.org/news/2015-01-earth-...ical-life.html
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Old 08-01-2019, 05:15 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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I think I read some time ago that the Moon might actually be a former part of the Earth that got split off in a catastrophic event.

I think a lot depends on whether or not the new planet revolves around its own axis, and how that axis is aligned with the sun.
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