U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-17-2019, 05:18 PM
 
1,150 posts, read 802,158 times
Reputation: 4313

Advertisements

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...ts/?comments=1

Oh goody, another 10B +++ pissed down the money pit that is the SLS!

Funny that Senatory Richard Shelby (The dude focing NASA to dump pretty much all it's money on this already-obsolete launch vehicle) once ridiculed the COTS program as a "Faith Based Initiative".

Now COTS has produced an operational rocket which can ALREADY do the SLS's job for 1/10th the price (the Falcon Heavy) with some on-orbit assembly, and is on the cusp of producing a PAIR of launch vehicles (New Glen and Falcon Super Heavy) that outclass even the largest (faith-based) iteration of the SLS for 1/100th the price!

Shelby doggles all the boons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-17-2019, 08:48 PM
 
132 posts, read 38,016 times
Reputation: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
And for an on-topic blurb: I predict Musk will land humans on Mars via his own launch vehicles long before NASA returns humans to the Moon via the SLS.
I agree. The rapid pace of development of SpaceX's Starship is amazing compared with NASA's SLS which is a typical overly expensive, overly bureaucratic, slow as molasses government project. Here's the presentation Elon Musk gave after completion of the Starship prototype in Texas:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOpMrVnjYeY

I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if SLS is cancelled altogether. Let's face it. Space isn't a big priority for the government since the Cold War is over. NASA employs a lot of people and they are involved in scientific stuff to justify its continued existence, but these aren't the Apollo days.

I have no idea if SpaceX will land someone on the Moon by 2024, but I do believe they will land a person on the Moon for the first time (since the Apollo program) AND Mars for the first time.

Last edited by Surfer Guy; 10-17-2019 at 08:57 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2019, 02:38 AM
 
1,150 posts, read 802,158 times
Reputation: 4313
Unless BFR and New Glen both turn out to be catastrophic failures, the SLS is doomed.

Eventually NASA is going to have to wake up and smell the Methane.

It's pretty telling when the goddamn Air Force is awarding fixed cost contracts and NASA is still trying to justify cost plus.

Shelby is literally pissing away countless dollars that could be used to perform NASA's core mission, simply to keep his constituents employed rebuilding "legacy" model-T's while private industry is manufacturing Tesla's.

Crazy for a supposed fiscal conservative to support this sort of anti-free-market stuff.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2019, 01:15 PM
 
364 posts, read 122,652 times
Reputation: 640
Just so happens I was a senior engineer with Lockheed assigned to the creation of the Orion spacecraft, from the very beginning. NASA JSC quickly realized they had no idea how to replicate what was done during the Apollo missions. They even brought in some of the engineers that worked on the Apollo missions. But they quickly realized any engineer still alive and cognizant was just a junior engineer and worked on the tail end of the program.


My opinion is that NASA lost its magic and creativity after ISS. They are over burdened by politics, paperwork, oversight, and fear of failure. Any engineer can testify that the safer you make an item the more unusable you make it. NASA has become crippled by efforts to make every mission 110% safe.


I am sure the private space companies still operate with the old motto, "failure is not an option".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2019, 04:01 AM
 
Location: PRC
3,250 posts, read 3,365,783 times
Reputation: 2950
Also we need to remember that however much money is spent on useless projects, it still helps the economy because it is going into peoples pockets and then gets spent at the local store.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2019, 11:04 AM
 
33,821 posts, read 17,312,451 times
Reputation: 18556
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasRoadkill View Post
My opinion is that NASA lost its magic and creativity after ISS. They are over burdened by politics, paperwork, oversight, and fear of failure. Any engineer can testify that the safer you make an item the more unusable you make it. NASA has become crippled by efforts to make every mission 110% safe.
From where I sit, the beginning of the end was when NASA gradually turned from R&D to being mostly the Space Shuttle owner/operator. For all of the amazing engineering, that vehicle was flawed, expensive and dangerous. And it gradually took over the host organism - NASA turned into a cash delivery system for the Shuttle supply chain. The Ares rockets in the Constellation program was an attempt at keeping the cash flowing, and SLS is more of the same. Throwing away 4 carefully-engineered-to-be-reusable RS-25s per launch? Jesus wept.

Hats off for Orion, that was a worthwhile thing to come out of Constellation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2019, 08:51 AM
 
7,168 posts, read 3,920,595 times
Reputation: 6765
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasRoadkill View Post
Just so happens I was a senior engineer with Lockheed assigned to the creation of the Orion spacecraft, from the very beginning. NASA JSC quickly realized they had no idea how to replicate what was done during the Apollo missions. They even brought in some of the engineers that worked on the Apollo missions. But they quickly realized any engineer still alive and cognizant was just a junior engineer and worked on the tail end of the program.


My opinion is that NASA lost its magic and creativity after ISS. They are over burdened by politics, paperwork, oversight, and fear of failure. Any engineer can testify that the safer you make an item the more unusable you make it. NASA has become crippled by efforts to make every mission 110% safe.


I am sure the private space companies still operate with the old motto, "failure is not an option".
If anyone has Apple TV+ (if you bought an iPhone, iPad or Apple TV after 9/20 you get a year free) watch "For All Mankind".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:02 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top