U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-05-2019, 06:22 PM
 
4,978 posts, read 2,028,443 times
Reputation: 9764

Advertisements

quote:
Picture this: A hundred million years ago, an advanced civilization detects strange signatures of life on a blue-green planet not so far away from their home in the Milky Way. They try sending signals, but whatever's marching around on that unknown world isn't responding. So, the curious galactic explorers try something different. They send a robotic probe to a small, quiet space rock orbiting near the life-rich planet, just to keep an eye on things.
https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science...c-rss_20191005
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-05-2019, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,537 posts, read 55,453,855 times
Reputation: 32253
Someone read "2001: A Space Odyssey"???
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2019, 11:43 AM
 
12,229 posts, read 3,229,016 times
Reputation: 8147
I think its unlikely too...mainly because the aliens are ALREADY here observing us, buzzing our skies frequently, they have shown up over military nuclear storage sites numerous times, and even disabled the systems temporarily.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2019, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Here
1,480 posts, read 362,806 times
Reputation: 5479
Quote:
Picture this: A hundred million years ago, an advanced civilization detects strange signatures of life on a blue-green planet not so far away from their home in the Milky Way. They try sending signals, but whatever's marching around on that unknown world isn't responding. So, the curious galactic explorers try something different. They send a robotic probe to a small, quiet space rock orbiting near the life-rich planet, just to keep an eye on things.
And? The idea that the solar system was visited in the distant past by beings that left evidence of their presence - and perhaps even the means to observe what's going on around Sol - is hardly new.

But why would they place a probe on a co-orbital? The probe could simply be place in co-orbit itself. But then, neither co-orbitals (such as 3753 Cruithne, apparently the object obliquely referenced in the linked article) nor a hypothesized co-orbital probe would be in orbits stable over a period as long as 100,000,000 years.

Besides, if one wanted to observe Earth, L4 and L5 would be far better locations. For one, they're much closer (the same distance as the Moon is to the Earth) than, for example, 3753 Cruithne - which never gets closer than about thirty times the Earth-Moon axis.

The reality is that if such an object ever existed (for which, it should be noted, not a shred of actual evidence exists) it would be near impossible for us to locate, either because it would have been destroyed in the interim or because it's lost out there about the trillions upon trillions of bits in the solar system.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2019, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Seattle
2,298 posts, read 490,180 times
Reputation: 2134
The problem with co-orbital asteroids is that their orbits are unstable and they tend to wander off after a while, due to external gravitational influences. By contrast, the Moon isn't going anywhere. To observe the Earth from the Moon, you can place your technology in a lava tunnel to protect it from micrometeorite impacts. A smaller tunnel near the lunar limb that lines up with the Earth might be ideal. Perhaps it would dig down to create a heat engine for power? Or it may have mined He3 from a nearby maria to provide a long-term fusion source.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2019, 11:21 AM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,207,066 times
Reputation: 3188
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
The problem with co-orbital asteroids is that their orbits are unstable and they tend to wander off after a while, due to external gravitational influences. By contrast, the Moon isn't going anywhere. To observe the Earth from the Moon, you can place your technology in a lava tunnel to protect it from micrometeorite impacts. A smaller tunnel near the lunar limb that lines up with the Earth might be ideal. Perhaps it would dig down to create a heat engine for power? Or it may have mined He3 from a nearby maria to provide a long-term fusion source.
Actually, the Moon is moving away from the Earth, albeit at a very miniscule rate (about 3.8 cm per year). It's not going anywhere anytime soon.
Is the Moon moving away from the Earth? When was this discovered? (Intermediate) - Curious About Astronomy? Ask an Astronomer
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2019, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Seattle
2,298 posts, read 490,180 times
Reputation: 2134
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Actually, the Moon is moving away from the Earth, albeit at a very miniscule rate (about 3.8 cm per year). It's not going anywhere anytime soon.
I know. The point being that the Moon's orbit is considered stable, and is unlikely to be perturbed away from the Earth for many billions of years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2019, 09:05 PM
 
5,203 posts, read 8,207,066 times
Reputation: 3188
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
I know. The point being that the Moon's orbit is considered stable, and is unlikely to be perturbed away from the Earth for many billions of years.
It was just a comment. In a way, relative to our perception of time, the Moon's orbit is sort of stable, but it does fluctuate. That's why I added, "It's not going anywhere anytime soon." It would be looking at about 50 billion years for the Moon to stop drifting out.

On the other hand, the Sun is expected to reach its maximum as a red giant in about 7.6 billion years, possibly consuming both the Earth and the Moon. In that case, it wouldn't really matter very much. Even if the Sun doesn't devour the Earth and Moon, they'd both be little more than charred celestial cinders.
https://futurism.com/a-rocky-relatio...ving-the-earth
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top