U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-23-2009, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Universal City, Texas
3,115 posts, read 6,159,546 times
Reputation: 1717

Advertisements



Moon Altitude Measurements


Altitude measurements of the south pole from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Permanently shadowed areas are coldest, and may hold ice; permanently illuminated areas may be good spots for solar power stations.

Is There Ice on the Moon? - FOXNews.com


Scientists worldwide are agog with speculation that NASA will announce the discovery of water on the moon.
The space agency's recently launched Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter reported tentative signs of lunar ice last week, and there are rumors that India's Chandrayaan-1 probe has more conclusive proof. NASA has scheduled a news conference for 2 p.m. ET on Thursday, and scientists are eagerly anticipating what may be revealed.

Ice on the Moon? Scientists Hope for Confirmation - Science News | Science & Technology | Technology News - FOXNews.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-24-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,292 posts, read 11,859,189 times
Reputation: 10775
Quote:
Originally Posted by gy2020 View Post

Moon Altitude Measurements


Altitude measurements of the south pole from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Permanently shadowed areas are coldest, and may hold ice; permanently illuminated areas may be good spots for solar power stations.

Is There Ice on the Moon? - FOXNews.com


Scientists worldwide are agog with speculation that NASA will announce the discovery of water on the moon.
The space agency's recently launched Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter reported tentative signs of lunar ice last week, and there are rumors that India's Chandrayaan-1 probe has more conclusive proof. NASA has scheduled a news conference for 2 p.m. ET on Thursday, and scientists are eagerly anticipating what may be revealed.

Ice on the Moon? Scientists Hope for Confirmation - Science News | Science & Technology | Technology News - FOXNews.com
I'm pretty sure there is some water ice on the moon; thanx for the links.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2009, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Home
1,479 posts, read 1,871,728 times
Reputation: 598
I am hoping we can start putting things like solar cells up there. SO much power just waiting to be tapped...


The only problem would be, what would you USE it for? You need to store it somehow. Would it be used to create rocket fuel (then you would need LOTS of water)? Store it all in batteries? Enrich Uranium? What? I don't think we have an extension cord quite long enough to reach........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2009, 03:02 PM
 
4,111 posts, read 4,696,694 times
Reputation: 1809
If water ice is indeed confirmed, then it will need to be explored direct and close up. If it's usable, how will it be extracted? It would take some serious efforts just to get the right equipment into the craters. Then presumably the material would need to be transposted out of the craters. How? I'm guessing the walls of the craters could be very deep and steep, perhaps more than rovers or proposed moon buggys can accomplish. I'm wondering if some kind of transport shuttles should be developed that could fly in and out of the craters?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2009, 06:05 PM
 
4,111 posts, read 4,696,694 times
Reputation: 1809
The Lunar news has confirmed water on the Moon. Not just at the poles, but all over. However, it's not like there are lakes of it. Still, it provides a new way of looking at the Moon


SPACE.com -- It's Official: Water Found on the Moon
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2009, 11:40 AM
 
4,111 posts, read 4,696,694 times
Reputation: 1809
Answering the question as to how to extract water from the lunar surface, it looks like there are a few options that might be able to do just that. Some of these techniques could be useful without needing to mine water from craters.
How NASA hopes to mine water on the moon - Space.com- msnbc.com


However, it has yet to be revealed exactly how to move ice from the interior of polar craters and transport it to where it would be processed or used. I can't see rovers doing the job. For any usefulness, it would require equipment that can fly in and out of the craters, unless they can blaze some "trails" for rovers to use.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2009, 07:01 AM
 
737 posts, read 1,038,300 times
Reputation: 419
Considering most of our water supply is being polluted or drying up and alot of states are now having to import water from other states, first thing that comes to mind for me is, is it consumable? I do beleave they have also found ice on Mars I do believe I'm not really into astrology myself but I have read here and there.

I'm pretty sure this want happen in my life time perhaps not even my son's life time but I could see where we could be living on other planets in the future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2009, 10:57 AM
 
737 posts, read 1,038,300 times
Reputation: 419
I could see us trying to harvest Mars before the moon because the moon plays to huge a roll on the earth. I mean the effects of the ice poles on the earth would make big difference to us as to how the earth would be effected. However mars doesn't have gravity.

Or I could see us growing food on another planet with artificial lights. However remember we can't do away with all production of plants on earth because plants breathe in carbon and produce oxygen where as we breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon.

I mean think about how it all works and then how gravity is only on earth. And to think some think their is no God. God is so amazing.

Ofcourse I'm not scientist so this would have to be worked out before we harm ourselves in the long run.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2009, 04:00 PM
 
4,111 posts, read 4,696,694 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starlady01 View Post
I could see us trying to harvest Mars before the moon because the moon plays to huge a roll on the earth. I mean the effects of the ice poles on the earth would make big difference to us as to how the earth would be effected. However mars doesn't have gravity.

Or I could see us growing food on another planet with artificial lights. However remember we can't do away with all production of plants on earth because plants breathe in carbon and produce oxygen where as we breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon.

I mean think about how it all works and then how gravity is only on earth. And to think some think their is no God. God is so amazing.

Ofcourse I'm not scientist so this would have to be worked out before we harm ourselves in the long run.

I agree with your point that we are intricately tied to the biosystem of Earth. The Earth is a very unique and remarkable planet in the solar system. Plants on Earth play a very important role in the biosystem. Certainly for any kind of long term colony or outpost on Mars, we'd need to have resources that can help sustain survival there. Food production is one thing that would be necessary. Water and breathable air are things that could potentially be extracted and refined for use from the planet. One way we can look at Mars is that although it's extremely different than Earth, it's closer to being an Earthlike planet than any others in the solar system. The Moon presents similar challenges as well, but maybe more difficult in many ways.

Both the Moon and Mars have gravity. If they didn't, everything would float off into space. Everything that has mass has gravity. The greater the mass, the stronger the pull of gravity. However, the mass of the Moon and Mars is less than that of the Earth. As such, the gravity there is less than it is here on Earth.

Where the big differences are, among other things, is different atmospheres. The Moon has very little to the point that you might as well say it has none. Mars has an atmosphere, but it's very thin compared to Earth's and you couldn't breath it. In addition (if I recall correctly), Mars has a very weak and strange magnetic system that's scattered in different locations on the planet. That means little protection from the solar winds that have blown most of Mars' atmosphere into space.

Since it appears that water ice is present on both the Moon and Mars, the question is how to best extract it. There's no question that the ice is covered with dust and rocks. After mining the ice, it would have to be filtered to be useful. We still need to determine how far underground the ice is.

The same thing probably applies to any ice with polar craters of the Moon, but moving material out of a deep crater to where it can be used presents different problems. It's not like you can lay pipelines down and pump it out of the crater. Finding that water is present all over the Moon might be easier in the long run. However, as I said, it's not like there are standing pools of it on the Moon. The water is tied up in the rocks and dust well below the surface. To get a small amount of water would mean mining large amounts of buried rock and debris, then processing and filtering it to extract the moisture. Again, it would be cheaper in the long run if we can use what resources can be found on Mars and the Moon than it would be to send it there by rockets from the Earth. Initially, sending supplies from Earth will still be necessary.

There's been a lot of talk bantered around about creating an atmosphere and terraforming Mars. To be honest, I really don't see that as being very likely. Among various hazards of Mars and the Moon is there's little protection from intense solar radiation. And of course, there's a problem of small meteors. With little atmosphere, there's not much friction to slow down any incoming objects. At best, any sizable habitats will probably have to be contained and protected, probably underground, although the first few people to actually go to Mars will probably use protected modular habitats that are above ground.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2009, 04:16 PM
 
737 posts, read 1,038,300 times
Reputation: 419
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
I agree with your point that we are intricately tied to the biosystem of Earth. The Earth is a very unique and remarkable planet in the solar system. Plants on Earth play a very important role in the biosystem. Certainly for any kind of long term colony or outpost on Mars, we'd need to have resources that can help sustain survival there. Food production is one thing that would be necessary. Water and breathable air are things that could potentially be extracted and refined for use from the planet. One way we can look at Mars is that although it's extremely different than Earth, it's closer to being an Earthlike planet than any others in the solar system. The Moon presents similar challenges as well, but maybe more difficult in many ways.

Both the Moon and Mars have gravity. If they didn't, everything would float off into space. Everything that has mass has gravity. The greater the mass, the stronger the pull of gravity. However, the mass of the Moon and Mars is less than that of the Earth. As such, the gravity there is less than it is here on Earth.

Where the big differences are, among other things, is different atmospheres. The Moon has very little to the point that you might as well say it has none. Mars has an atmosphere, but it's very thin compared to Earth's and you couldn't breath it. In addition (if I recall correctly), Mars has a very weak and strange magnetic system that's scattered in different locations on the planet. That means little protection from the solar winds that have blown most of Mars' atmosphere into space.

Since it appears that water ice is present on both the Moon and Mars, the question is how to best extract it. There's no question that the ice is covered with dust and rocks. After mining the ice, it would have to be filtered to be useful. We still need to determine how far underground the ice is.

The same thing probably applies to any ice with polar craters of the Moon, but moving material out of a deep crater to where it can be used presents different problems. It's not like you can lay pipelines down and pump it out of the crater. Finding that water is present all over the Moon might be easier in the long run. However, as I said, it's not like there are standing pools of it on the Moon. The water is tied up in the rocks and dust well below the surface. To get a small amount of water would mean mining large amounts of buried rock and debris, then processing and filtering it to extract the moisture. Again, it would be cheaper in the long run if we can use what resources can be found on Mars and the Moon than it would be to send it there by rockets from the Earth. Initially, sending supplies from Earth will still be necessary.

There's been a lot of talk bantered around about creating an atmosphere and terraforming Mars. To be honest, I really don't see that as being very likely. Among various hazards of Mars and the Moon is there's little protection from intense solar radiation. And of course, there's a problem of small meteors. With little atmosphere, there's not much friction to slow down any incoming objects. At best, any sizable habitats will probably have to be contained and protected, probably underground, although the first few people to actually go to Mars will probably use protected modular habitats that are above ground.
You are right I should of thought of that I guess rocks ect would float away. I guess I get that from when they landed on the moon and alot of people thought it was fake because of the way the flag was flying. But they flag was flying dus because other planets have less gravity then Earth.

I even read some place there are people who still think we ain't made it to the moon yet it was a hoax. I'm sure most people now adays who didn't believe do so now adays vs those who didn't back in the day.

I know I see them on the moon and how they were hopping because of less gravity. Earth has alot more gravity then other planets. As to size playing a part I have never heard this before.

I don't really read alot up on the subject but I do every now and again run into things and sometimes I do look things up on purpose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology > Space
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:29 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top