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Old 06-26-2016, 11:44 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,664 times
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Hi there. This is currently happening to my son. He is 11 years old and for some reason, has started peeing on the carpet in his room. He is completely potty trained and has been potty trained for several years now, but just started peeing on his floor about 2 or 3 weeks ago. He will also pee on the bathroom floor and then play in it. I don't understand why this is happening and I do tell him that this is wrong and that he can't do that and he seems to understand but then has continued to do it. I am making him go to the restroom every 2 hours or so, but have missed a few times and sure enough, I am met by a wet floor. I know that you posted this a while ago, but was there anything in particular that you did to help him stop?

Thanks,

Leslie
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Old 06-27-2016, 12:32 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
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I'm thinking this is fairly common with boys & Autism; my 12 yr old son has had similar issues. It seems like he's trying to get negative attention. All kids do that but with Autism it just gets expressed a bit differently.

I find that if I ignore it he will stop for a while. This is so hard to do. Some people hoard toilet paper or stockpile shampoo... I, on the other hand; I seem to have bottles of Clorox in almost every room in the house!
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Old 07-11-2016, 02:09 AM
 
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Oh my God yes!! He is totally seeking negative attention because it's not just the peeing, he also puts things in his mouth and then looks at me with a smirk. Or he'll put someyhing between his legs and look at me and laugh. So you're right. It's definitely negative attention he's seeking and I just need to ignore it, and also keep bleech and Resolve carpet cleaner nearby. Thank you so much!
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Old 07-11-2016, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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Never pay off attention-seeking behavior, it only reinforces it. See my earlier post on this thread re: differential reinforcement.
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Old 07-11-2016, 10:33 AM
 
Location: East of the Appaichans
325 posts, read 205,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MGotcha View Post
My 10yr old autistic son has made great progress this year, getting a bit more verbal and finally out of pull ups, but this week he woke up early in the morning and spent two hours playing around his room and peeing on the TV!
I think the pee pee could cause an electrical short in the TV and possibly the kid,
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Old 07-11-2016, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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^^ This particular instance occurred a half-dozen years ago and was quickly resolved, per the thread.
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Old 07-12-2016, 07:15 PM
 
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Something I have always wondered about this behavior ...

We also see this when dementia progresses to a certain point, in certain afflicted people.

With several blood relatives on the spectrum and a few who've succumbed to Alzheimer's any hint of some sort of association scares the bejesus out of me.
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Old 07-12-2016, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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The development of Alzheimer's is more strongly associated with people with Down syndrome (in cases where they live long enough) than it is people with autism.
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:25 AM
 
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We are going through a very rough period with our 22 yr old. He has his own space downstairs and has been peeing in inappropriate places. It started with the shower then into cups, glasses, whatever he could find, then into towells, sheets, clothing...he then started stuffing these items back into the closet or drawer where he found them. When we removed everything we could, he started taking items from our closets and peeing on them. It's maddening and we seem powerless to stop it. There is no question he knows this is wrong but his ocd's are so aggressive he too seems powerless to stop. We've locked him out of his private space and the peeing has continued anyway. He's got us having to watch him during all waking hours but then he gets up when we're all asleep.
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