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Old 09-13-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: In the AC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Fantastic!
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Old 09-13-2010, 03:30 PM
 
Location: central Oregon
1,862 posts, read 2,106,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
Too true, nimchimpsky! My support structure contains several families with members on the spectrum and no one thinks twice about autie, aspie, rettnoid, etc. Just like no one thinks twice about calling a premature infant a premie. We also call neurotypicals "nits" -- because they're a nuisance at times and hard to get rid of LOL.

If someone uses the term "aspie" in a derogatory manner or doesn't take us seriously because of the term we use to desribe ourselves it really doesn't matter all that much. When you spend your life being discriminated against, demeaned, marginalized and ignored one more idjit in the line really doesn't puncture your hide too deep.
I like "nits", it fits my brother.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Oh, so very true! My son has Asperger's (and does not mind the Aspie name). My brother is NT and fits that description to a T. I am somewhere between them and happy for my differences.
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:10 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,594,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
Too true, nimchimpsky! My support structure contains several families with members on the spectrum and no one thinks twice about autie, aspie, rettnoid, etc. Just like no one thinks twice about calling a premature infant a premie. We also call neurotypicals "nits" -- because they're a nuisance at times and hard to get rid of LOL.

If someone uses the term "aspie" in a derogatory manner or doesn't take us seriously because of the term we use to desribe ourselves it really doesn't matter all that much. When you spend your life being discriminated against, demeaned, marginalized and ignored one more idjit in the line really doesn't puncture your hide too deep.
i've never heard the term 'nit'. my wife and i have been using the word 'nt' to refer to neurotypicals but obviously not a very affectionate sounding word. 'nt' still reminds me of a.p. biology lectures about neurotransmitters cause my bio teacher always called them nt's, lol. i'll have to tell my wife about 'nits.'

and i'm right there with you. being called aspie doesn't really make me feel like i've just been 'slammed big time,' if you know what i mean, lol.

Last edited by nimchimpsky; 09-13-2010 at 07:21 PM..
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:14 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,594,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gungnir View Post
Well, apparently what you know about Aspergers can be written on the back of a postage stamp. My wife laughed at this, she's an Aspie, and said the following...

"Sounds like someone is trying to get into a slanging match by pushing emotional triggers, sad that they don't get that most of the triggers they're trying to push don't exist in an Aspie."

Let's be straight here, cults are for people who want to join a group for social acceptance. An Aspie joining a cult would be like someone who's black joining the KKK. They don't understand or need social acceptance, and groups can freak them out.
lol, this was so funny i really did laugh out loud. great post and so dead on.

a: hey! want to start an aperger's syndrome society?

b: no, i think i'll just stay in my room alone living off my closet stash of mac and cheese.

lol.
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Old 09-13-2010, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,611,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
lol, this was so funny i really did laugh out loud. great post and so dead on.

a: hey! want to start an aperger's syndrome society?

b: no, i think i'll just stay in my room alone living off my closet stash of mac and cheese.

lol.
LOL

a: but I have a really cool fan and my chair spins

b: well, maybe, as long as I can bring my mac-n-cheese and the chair fabric isn't scratchy

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Old 09-14-2010, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,318,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoExcuses View Post
For a while now I've been seeing people refer to those with what is called asperger's syndrome as "Aspies".

I have never heard of people with an affliction have an overall nickname like that.

IMO, it sounds like a breed of dog. Dogs aren't just dogs, they are collies, or german shephards, or great danes, or irish setters.

Now we have kids who are aspies. There aren't any downsies, or cancees, or blindies or anything else, but there are aspies.

I would hate for my child to be referred to as I would refer to my dog.
It's verbal shorthand, and is used by many who have ASDs themselves. I don't find "Aspie" offensive, because I've never heard it used as an epithet. I am far more likely to object to "ree-tard" and "that's so gay!", both of which are far more prevalent.
John Elder Robison uses (and I think coined) the term "Aspergians". I find it unwieldy, personally.
As for "there are no cancees or Downsies or--"...you're expecting a person on the spectrum to be like everybody else? You're doomed to be disappointed, I'm afraid.
But I promise never to refer to my daughter, sister, or anyone else on the spectrum as a shih tzu or keeshond. Maybe a Burmese or Abyssinian, though. She's more of a cat person. And, y'know, as they say, all cats have Asperger's. http://specialchildren.about.com/od/...catshaveAS.htm

Last edited by Aconite; 09-14-2010 at 06:41 AM..
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Old 09-14-2010, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoExcuses View Post
As a point of pride? You mean like being proud to be gay? What exactly is there to be proud of having aspergers?

And I have heard someone say they have an aspie. In fact, right here in this forum.
Possibly me. The family tree's full of 'em. (Probably even more if we get to use AnonChick's standard of self-diagnosis.) Qu'elle horreur!

In my daughter's case, yes, she has Asperger's, which contributes to a higher than average anxiety level, ADHD symptoms, and a tendency to be very concrete. She also has a stratospheric IQ, perfect pitch, a gift for written expression, and is virtually impervious to peer pressure (a definite plus for a teenaged girl). She has a unique and refreshing worldview. It's a mixed bag-- some minuses, some pluses. The biggest minus, I've found, is people who persist in thinking she's defective, or "less than", because she is different from other girls (sometimes even while decrying what trainwrecks typical 12- and 13-yo girls are). That I'd love to see a cure for.
Saying "I'm proud to have an Aspie" would be like saying "I'm proud to have a kid". It's silly. But I am proud of her, and yes, she is an "Aspie", by whatever name she chooses to define herself. Because ultimately, it isn't up to us, it's up to her.

Last edited by Aconite; 09-14-2010 at 06:20 AM..
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Old 09-14-2010, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
That is exactly how I feel about people who prefer to cutsify "Aspergers" into "Aspies." It sounds like they are buying into the negativity that THEY perceive of it, and are trying to convince themselves that it's a fluffy happy puppydog instead. What's wrong with A.S.? Why try to wrap it in colorful fluffy stuffing, as the author suggests she's trying to do, if you don't think of it as a negative thing in the first place?

It's not a colorful fluffy stuffing thing. It's not a happy peppy joyful bouncy little puppydog. I don't particularly buy into the notion that it's a "syndrome" either, but no one has to add the "syndrome" part in casual conversation when bringing up the fact that they or someone they know has Aspergers. Or A.S.

And actually, when I first heard the term "Aspies" I thought someone was talking about a cheerleader group at Aspen High School in Colorado. It was pretty confusing, to say the least.

I think you're trying to see deep and hidden neuroses in what is simply linguistic laziness. A popular pastime, and no doubt deeply entertaining, but ultimately futile.
And for most of the country, Aspen High simply isn't on the radar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoExcuses View Post

This is how people who aren't associated with aspergers hear the term aspie, so if anyone gets some chuckles and asked, 'Now are those longed haired, or short?', or 'Now what breeds are mixed to get those?', don't be surprised.
In person, I'd probably think it was funny. Online, I'd be more likely to assume you were shilling for rep points.
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Old 09-14-2010, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,318,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoExcuses View Post

The name sounds so very twinkie to be used to refer to a condition that people want to be taken seriously. Really, who can take it seriously when those inflicted are called aspies? It sounds like they should be on a morning children's show like the Teletubbies or Barney.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoExcuses View Post
With an attitude like that it's inviting people to look down on aspergers.

Glad to know it's nothing but a silly cult. I never did believe it was real. Just a bunch of clowns, a bunch of asswipes.
By the way-- does anybody else see the irony here? Aren't the autistics traditionally supposed to be the ones lacking in empathy and blurting out rude comments?
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Old 09-14-2010, 08:59 AM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,594,821 times
Reputation: 12532
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
LOL

a: but I have a really cool fan and my chair spins

b: well, maybe, as long as I can bring my mac-n-cheese and the chair fabric isn't scratchy

LOL i laughed so hard, great post.

acon: no i've never heard of that shirt but now that you told me about it i'll have to get one, lol.
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