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Old 03-17-2012, 05:09 PM
 
449 posts, read 925,664 times
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I work with a woman who is cognitively disabled, she's 37 and mentally around 14. I think she went to school before there was as much help in living skill for things like behavior for work, dating, social skills. She's good at her job and does well, but does have difficulty understanding what's ok to joke about, thinks pretty literally and can respond like your typical teen slamming things when she's angry. I guess she's at the spot where she's almost too high functioning for some special activities, but can't judge situations/people well enough to protect herself in regular situations. She'd be fine if she had a "buddy" along, not good at judging who is really a friend.

Anyway, I don't know if her parents try to get her involved in social things or if she's just wanting to decide for herself and not listen to them (like any teen). She had a very close call with a facebook "friend" and was keeping it all a secret from her parents. Luckily, they found out somehow and she didn't get to meet this online guy for their date. I can't say for certain if he was trolling for vulnerable people or thought he was texting a 35 yr old woman. Scary stuff. She's really feeling socially lonely I guess, and is a bit boy crazy, wanting a boyfriend. I was trying to think of safe ways she could meet people and maybe date in a group or something. I know ARC has dances, movie nights and other fun things. I thought maybe she could volunteer to help out at special olympics. Part of the problem is that she and or parents think she's "not that disabled" and so she spends her time at work and home, that's it. She feels self concious I think, at joining a regular class/Y exercise because she can't quite keep up. Does anyone have any suggestions? I was going to look up things that were safe/that she might like, and any you might have ideas for and give them to her. Then her parents could give their input to her.
I think she'd be great at helping out younger kids in some way, would be good for her self-esteem too.
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Old 03-22-2012, 06:42 AM
 
4,171 posts, read 3,796,565 times
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It's really tough with an adult like this since there really isn't that much out there. The fact that the parents aren't maybe being realistic about the needs of the daughter is yet another hurdle. In your place, I would call the high school in town and ask to speak to the head of the Special Education Department and just give them the details you have given here and see if they have any ideas because they can be a really good resource because they do the searching for the students getting ready to transition into adult life. I have a son with Down syndrome who is 25 years old and trying to find a "fit" for his adult life is driving me over the edge right now as everything is either very restrictive or just throw them out into society and see if they sink or swim. I'd give the high school a call. And, so nice of you to show concern.
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Old 03-22-2012, 07:05 AM
 
418 posts, read 443,607 times
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So much depends on where you are. Near me, there are so many social groups for disabled adults that my son could be out every night if I had the time and energy to play taxi.

Talk to your local ARC, Easter Seals, or churches. Also, talk to the Developmental Disabilities Council in your area. Those organizations should be great sources of information.
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Old 12-31-2012, 12:07 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,038 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwestmom View Post
I work with a woman who is cognitively disabled, she's 37 and mentally around 14. I think she went to school before there was as much help in living skill for things like behavior for work, dating, social skills. She's good at her job and does well, but does have difficulty understanding what's ok to joke about, thinks pretty literally and can respond like your typical teen slamming things when she's angry. I guess she's at the spot where she's almost too high functioning for some special activities, but can't judge situations/people well enough to protect herself in regular situations. She'd be fine if she had a "buddy" along, not good at judging who is really a friend.

Anyway, I don't know if her parents try to get her involved in social things or if she's just wanting to decide for herself and not listen to them (like any teen). She had a very close call with a facebook "friend" and was keeping it all a secret from her parents. Luckily, they found out somehow and she didn't get to meet this online guy for their date. I can't say for certain if he was trolling for vulnerable people or thought he was texting a 35 yr old woman. Scary stuff. She's really feeling socially lonely I guess, and is a bit boy crazy, wanting a boyfriend. I was trying to think of safe ways she could meet people and maybe date in a group or something. I know ARC has dances, movie nights and other fun things. I thought maybe she could volunteer to help out at special olympics. Part of the problem is that she and or parents think she's "not that disabled" and so she spends her time at work and home, that's it. She feels self concious I think, at joining a regular class/Y exercise because she can't quite keep up. Does anyone have any suggestions? I was going to look up things that were safe/that she might like, and any you might have ideas for and give them to her. Then her parents could give their input to her.
I think she'd be great at helping out younger kids in some way, would be good for her self-esteem too.
I have a daughter that is similar. I have just relocated to the Denver area and I cannot seem to find anything that could help her socially. She needs a place that is safe that she can make friends. She is not mentally disable however suffers from Bipolar and does not have any social perception. I am looking for a place or places that she can go to make friends. My daughter is 25.
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Old 01-20-2013, 09:19 AM
 
223 posts, read 143,567 times
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here in the burlington vermont area there are a number of social options. special olympics being one of the more popular ones.
i know of one group home which has four young people living there and they are very involved in group activities. i think it's a great model for the future, small groups of peers living and socialising with each other and out in the community.
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