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Old 03-24-2012, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
2,371 posts, read 8,139,203 times
Reputation: 747

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had an email and at all 6 flags park they have had a policy change that no long give Austim folks the passes to avoid waiting in lines like in years past. No longer can you go ride to ride instead you are going to have time you have to ride, this does not sound like a fun day..rethinking buying season passes now.
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:42 PM
 
5,366 posts, read 4,372,799 times
Reputation: 3282
With Autism increasing at the rate that it is, 6 Flags had to change their policy. Every 50th boy that comes into their park has the condition now! They just can't accommodate all the autistic children now because there are so many.

CDC: U.S. kids with autism up 78% in past decade - CNN.com
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Old 03-31-2012, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
2,371 posts, read 8,139,203 times
Reputation: 747
really, ya think we are all going to show up on the same day tor ruin your day? they can accommodate its a load of bs how they have changed it. Some lawyers are already working on this because of the ADA issues for several groups, not just the AS folks.
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Old 03-31-2012, 10:02 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 32,625,945 times
Reputation: 42187
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
With Autism increasing at the rate that it is, 6 Flags had to change their policy. Every 50th boy that comes into their park has the condition now! They just can't accommodate all the autistic children now because there are so many.

CDC: U.S. kids with autism up 78% in past decade - CNN.com
Being autistic does not automatically include a physical handicap, such as the inability to stand for long periods of time, and many autistic children do not have this problem. Kids with Aspergers typically do not have severe physical handicaps, if any at all.

OP, I would contact the park. Actually, I would look around for people who have gone through this before with Six Flags. (I know the ordeals at Disneyland are very well documented: whom to call, what to ask, what they'll need to see, etc.) Depending on the nature of your child's disability, perhaps they just need to see a doctor's note or something. Good luck!
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Old 08-14-2015, 10:48 PM
 
289 posts, read 258,666 times
Reputation: 321
Just thought I'd add to this since I was recently at Six Flags. We took a group of kids with psychological and developmental problems to Six Flags Great America. We inquired about the Equal Access Pass for them while there. There was a sign in the room where you get passes that has more details than the SF website gives. Basically it says the passes are meant for people who have physical or mental disabilities that would make it extremely difficult for them to stand in line and wait. When I got to the counter I immediately told the employee about the kids' mental disabilities (I don't know if she would have asked had I not offered the information right away). Namely, we had a kid with who had Tourette's, among other problems, who loses control of his body to his tics when he gets anxious. We would have surely had to leave several lines early or not allow him on rides if we didn't have a pass. These are kids who are at a nonprofit shelter, so they would not have been able to afford Flash Passes to solve this problem.

The lady at the counter was very polite and didn't ask any more about their disabilities. They give you a sheet with a log on it. They write in a wait time at the top, and that's how long you wait for each ride (granted you wait somewhere comfortable outside of the line). You go to the exit line at each ride and an attendant marks your log for that ride. Some of the newer rides may have special exceptions, like not being able to ride them for your first ride or having to wait a longer wait time for them.

So in summary, we were able to get an EAP for non-physical disabilities because their disabilities still would have impacted the kids' ability to wait in line as well as others can. It did not give us the privilege to "skip the line" because we still had to wait, just elsewhere from the queue. The employees did not ask us for documentation, and were very polite and respectful when talking to us.
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Old 08-15-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,907 posts, read 32,625,945 times
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Awesome! They wouldn't give us one for our daughter (same park), but this was a year or two ago. She got too hot waiting in line and fell over, then threw up in the first aid office. Not fun.
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Old 08-18-2015, 06:29 AM
Status: ""Abortion Stops A Beating Heart!"" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Kansas
18,282 posts, read 12,022,307 times
Reputation: 17106
We have son with Down syndrome and never asked for special consideration when going to Disney 10 times over quite a few years. We did, however, see a LOT of people with a disability go to the front of the line and I swear to you, they usually had at least 10 in their party, sometimes more. Saw lots of people rent wheelchairs and family members took turns riding in them.

It is difficult for most with children to wait in line. There are people that need accommodation and if others weren't cheaters, this wouldn't be an issue.
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Old 08-18-2015, 08:41 PM
 
2,779 posts, read 4,189,218 times
Reputation: 4991
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orangejello View Post
Just thought I'd add to this since I was recently at Six Flags. We took a group of kids with psychological and developmental problems to Six Flags Great America. We inquired about the Equal Access Pass for them while there. There was a sign in the room where you get passes that has more details than the SF website gives. Basically it says the passes are meant for people who have physical or mental disabilities that would make it extremely difficult for them to stand in line and wait. When I got to the counter I immediately told the employee about the kids' mental disabilities (I don't know if she would have asked had I not offered the information right away). Namely, we had a kid with who had Tourette's, among other problems, who loses control of his body to his tics when he gets anxious. We would have surely had to leave several lines early or not allow him on rides if we didn't have a pass. These are kids who are at a nonprofit shelter, so they would not have been able to afford Flash Passes to solve this problem.

The lady at the counter was very polite and didn't ask any more about their disabilities. They give you a sheet with a log on it. They write in a wait time at the top, and that's how long you wait for each ride (granted you wait somewhere comfortable outside of the line). You go to the exit line at each ride and an attendant marks your log for that ride. Some of the newer rides may have special exceptions, like not being able to ride them for your first ride or having to wait a longer wait time for them.

So in summary, we were able to get an EAP for non-physical disabilities because their disabilities still would have impacted the kids' ability to wait in line as well as others can. It did not give us the privilege to "skip the line" because we still had to wait, just elsewhere from the queue. The employees did not ask us for documentation, and were very polite and respectful when talking to us.
Sorry. Just a quick point. Tourette's (which my son has) is a medical neurological condition, not a mental, psychological or developmental disability. It sounds like the kid also had other needs but I just wanted to point that out.
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Old 06-28-2017, 01:08 PM
 
1 posts, read 705 times
Reputation: 10
As a grandparent of a child with autism (who may not be immediately recognized as being on the spectrum), I would urge all parents of typical children to employ a level of understanding if they see a child being allowed to go ahead of others. Most parks do require some written statement of the child's issue, so perhaps we can let their judgment suffice. This could also be a teachable moment for children and parents in patience and allowing others with special needs to enjoy a day at an amusement park.
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