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Old 10-01-2007, 04:45 AM
 
Location: In the sunshine on a ship with a plank
3,413 posts, read 7,979,578 times
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I'm the custodial stepmom of a 12 yo autistic child (PDD) and have made it a habit to read everything I can get my hands on about all autism spectrum disorders.

A few weeks ago, in People Magazine, of all places I saw a review for a book called Look Me in the Eye, My Life with Aspergers by John Elder Robison. Robison is a 50 something man who was diagnosed with Aspergers when he was in his late 30s.

The book is his memoir and for the first time I was able to hear the voice of someone who suffers from ASD, learn of their limitations, desires, and frustrations. The story is enlightening, entertaining and enjoyable.

For instance, John has trouble with names and renamed his baby brother Snort, then Varmit (that brother is now a best selling author). He calls his wife Unit 2 because she is the second of three sisters----and of course the Sisters in Law are Units 1 and 3- and their husbands are 1-b and 3b.

I don't claim that this book will solve all or any of your problems as parents of autistics, but it will definitely give you some insight into some of their quirks.

It's a new release, available at Barnes and Noble and Borders.
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Old 10-01-2007, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Eastern PA
1,263 posts, read 4,383,799 times
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Thanks so much for the recommendation. I would love to read that book.

My 13 y/o son has Asperger's and so does my husband (self-diagnosed after our son's diagnosis). I have a much easier time trying to relate to my son - my husband OTOH can be downright frustrating in the communications department. I can't wait to read that book!
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Old 10-01-2007, 10:58 PM
 
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I have 3 sons, ages 20, 17, and 14, all with Asperger's, 2 of them also ADHD.
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Old 10-02-2007, 04:04 AM
 
Location: NoVa
18,434 posts, read 29,373,398 times
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You know Pg, L has gotten to a place where she can tell me, mommy, I dont know how to explain this to you. Then she will calm down, and we will try another route, after trying to see what was going on in the first place to bring whatever on....

She does quite well, she didn't used to, but now she does. When she tells me that, I am just amazed, because I realize, that truly, she doesn't. But she figures out a way, and then does.
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Old 10-02-2007, 04:36 AM
 
Location: In the sunshine on a ship with a plank
3,413 posts, read 7,979,578 times
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What I found interesting was Robison's explanation of his issues with relating with people and not being able to converse and interact appropriately even into adulthood. Too often people think these children aren't interested in engaging with others when in actuality they want to so badly but are unable to carry through with give and take conversation.

He progressed by modeling other children and going against what is natural for him in interactions.

And what's funny is now he has a teenaged son who will occasionally tell him, "Dad, you're being too autistic."

The book really is charming...........
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Old 10-02-2007, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Union County, NC
2,115 posts, read 6,437,860 times
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I am an avid reader, and for some reason, I am having trouble getting through the above named book. I won't elaborate as to why I think I'm having difficulty.

But I would like to make another recommendation, Daniel Isn't Talking by Marti Leimbach. It is fiction but it is the emotion is very real. It reads like pages from the mother's diary. And the author based it on her family's personal strory. The family is in crisism there are clearly humorous points. This family felt like my own. Lots of raw emotion. Very touching for mothers whom have children who are autistic.

Sara
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Old 10-08-2007, 05:54 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 19,707,229 times
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There's another good book--I think it's called Born on a Blue Day. Please read it--it's fabulous. The guy is a genius and gives all of us hope.
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Old 10-09-2007, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Happiness is found inside your smile :)
3,178 posts, read 13,390,472 times
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My son has Aspergers - and other kids have a hard time relating to him. He speaks his own numerical language sometimes...we tell him to talk to us with WORDS not NUMBERS

Example : He said " Luke = Chips" what he wanted to say was "It was Luke's turn for snack today and we got chips!"

Plus he's utterly inflexible when it comes to Time or Distance "How many blocks till we are home?" "Are we closer to the grocery store or home?" "We HAVE to be home by 7 pm because that's what you said last week"
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Old 10-10-2007, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Pa
20,310 posts, read 19,406,895 times
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An excellent book : Autism a fathers story by Bill Davis
It really calls out the sacrifice and the determination a parent must have in order to give their autistic child the best chance to become independant or at least functional. It also calls out some things you can do to help protect them.
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Old 10-12-2007, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Delaware OH
57 posts, read 241,615 times
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A close relative of mine has Asperger's and is doing tremendously well in his 30s. Great guy, once you learn how to interact with him.

Reading this might help your child when he/she is a bit older

Contents - Marc Segar 1974-1997: A Survival Guide for People with Asperger Syndrome - Contents

It was written by a young man with Asperger's. Really enlightening as to how the condition appears to someone with it.

Good luck and God bless you!

Last edited by mapcat; 10-12-2007 at 11:01 PM.. Reason: tried to fix url tags...not allowed yet apparently
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