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Old 12-30-2008, 03:32 AM
 
1 posts, read 4,632 times
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My daughter is 21 with Downs and an absolute delight. The only times she may have a mood is when she is about to get her monthly, but that only lasts a day. She always smiles, never complains and funny as could be. My biggest worry is what and who will care for her when I am gone. She will always live with me of course but I still worry for the future. Let me also say that she is the sunshine in my life and I am so blessed to have her as my daughter. She is about to graduate high school this year and is thrilled she is getting her cap and gown and walking with the rest of the seniors. I'm thrilled too! Like the other poster, she can't read or use money, can't really count nor do the alphabet either. I was 24 years old when I had her and it was a difficult many years, but we all survived!
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Old 01-03-2009, 05:14 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,236 posts, read 18,512,788 times
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I was a Special Ed teacher for many years and the Downs kids were by far my favorites. It sounds strange to say this, but there is something that is so innocent and loveable about them that I wonder if it is part of the Syndrome.
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Old 01-07-2009, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Denver
1,082 posts, read 4,299,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by specialpeople101 View Post
I am sorry it took me so long to answer, I have gotten on full time at the home and have been very busy. The Lady I work with that has Downs, is very moody, she pouts, wants her way, will cry at a drop of a hat. My boss says this is normal behavior for Downs. I am trying to read everything I can and learn more to be able to help her.
Speople101
I think this is normal behavior for people who have learned that MOST people will assume they can't do things--it is the same form of acting out that young children use when they think they can con their parents into caretaking.

I find that often if I tell my daughter,"I know you can do this, and you know you can do this" then the moodiness, pouting, crying, etc. will stop because it is a behavior they use to control their environment, an environment in which most decisions are taken out of their control.
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Old 01-26-2009, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Wichita Falls, Texas
1 posts, read 4,556 times
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NewToCa,

I know it was almost 2 years ago you posted that link, but I found it very helpful in explaining some of the "different" behaviors that my adult son (he's 21- almost done with high school!) has been exhibiting. I'm still worried that the trouble with making eye contact and need to self-stim are indicative of something other than Down's, but at least now I know that the incessant talking to himself is normal. Even if it does drive his sisters nutz!

Thanks again,

Nancy Anne
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Old 02-04-2009, 01:44 PM
 
Location: LOUISIANA
2 posts, read 9,084 times
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Down Syndrome Education USA

I posted a reply to the article on using dangerous psychoactive meds as a way to "treat" Downs Syndrome. Please read my response to that article. I am curator for my retarded brother who just celebrated his 61st birthday.
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Old 02-04-2009, 06:45 PM
 
Location: LOUISIANA
2 posts, read 9,084 times
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I am saddened to see support for use of dangerous psychoactive substances as "treatment" for Downs Syndrome- I am curator for my brother who has Downs- Billy celebrated his 61st birthday on Jan 30th, 2009 at the home of our sister. We were joined by another of our brothers, a niece, & a first cousin who also spoils him as we all do- I drove Billy and another brother to Baton Rouge to our sister & brother in law's new home to celebrate his BDay. He often goes there when I drive him to Baton Rouge for shopping, etc during the month. Billy is an important part of our family & we can't imagine what life would be like without him in our lives- We work hard at focusing on Billy's healthy diet & healthy supplements..WITHOUT DRUGS- I do most of his diet planning & make health decisions for him- Because of this continuous focus on healthy ways of stalling aging & keeping him alert & well focused, Billy is often termed in recent years as MORE INTELLIGENT than he was when he was younger- At one time we tried Ginkgo for him as well as for ourselves, but we chose to instead continue with other healthy supplements, even teas, mostly FOOD supplements & a few herbal supplements- Billy stopped walking over 4 years ago, so we like most Downs people's families felt it was as expected- However WE were not ready to accept that- I am the one who pitched our son's Ritalin over 35 years ago when I realized it was doing bad things to our son's brain, then devised a healthy diet that TOTALLY ELIMINATED his hyperactive & defiant behavior, then he went on to become a dedicated HONOR ROLL student- I decided that Billy too, because of the DOWNS, needed MORE attention for keeping HIS BRAIN healthy while we'd work harder at stalling AGING- Billy, with speech that is unclear to many, lets others realize that HE HEARS others when they comment about his still being with us- He once asked > WHAT ARE you all going to do if I reach SEVENTY Two, bc I am headed to SIXTY Two- He, with our pushing him to continue moving, decided to TRY harder after he stopped walking and he did NOT like using the potty chair all the time since he stayed in bed a good part of the time since not walking- SINCE that time when he stopped walking, then became totally dependent on a wheelchair, Billy has had totally dedication by my brother & I for help to GET BACK TO WALKING, help nutritionally AND with our own methods of home therapy. B/C of this, he IS NOW AGAIN walking quite a bit, often performing for family & others...counting..LOOK..1, 2, 3, 1, 2 3,..NO NO LET ME WALK ALL THE WAY..DO NOT PUT THE WHEELCHAIR THERE, GET IT OUT OF THE WAY, I WANT TO WALK INTO HER HOUSE, or I WANT TO WALK TO the door AT WAL MART but we insist on using the wheel chair when we take him shopping. He often says JUST STAND NEXT TO ME, LET ME DO IT- He is so proud recently that he CAN GET HIMSELF OUT OF THE TUB as he holds onto his stainless handlebars we have on the wall- His PROGRESS is remarkable- While WE worry over an eye we need to get tended to for him, hoping his poor vision might be just cataract related, with his GOOD EYE, HE continues to read his large print BIBLE I bought him- He asked my brother> Please EXPLAIN THIS, THE PARTING OF THE RED SEA< Then he pointed to a picture in the Bible saying, THIS is the same picture that Lil Sis gave you, the one you hung on your bedroom wall which is ROAD TO EMMAUS- It's true that I began this natural way with healthy approaches to good brain function over 3 decades ago for our little boy- It's also my belief that it is AS MUCH CRUELTY to DRUG DOWNS SYNDROME people with PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES as it is to DRUG CHILDREN, drugging that leads to high risk for FRONTAL LOBE DAMAGE in the brain- It is our strong belief from experience that Downs people are quite sensitive to anything that is FOREIGN to the body, so chemical sensitivity is often noticed quickly in them, even with intakes of things such as coal tar dyes, artificial sweeteners, blood thinning preservatives, etc. I AM making it clear that I AM AGAINST DRUGGING DOWNS SYNDROME people with Prozac and Focalin-

Posted by: Charmelle Guercio | February 04, 2009 at 07:55 AM
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Old 02-04-2009, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,633 posts, read 41,906,761 times
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My favorite student is an older teen with Down Syndrome. He's got a great, gregarious disposition, and while stubborn at times, is seldom in a negative mood. He can read at a mid-elementary school level, prepare simple meals from a written recipe or box instructions, calculate addition with carrying and subtraction with borrowing on paper, and larger numbers with a calulator, and has most multiplication facts committed to memory. He is a very good speller, due to having a sharp memory. Because he is getting more and more toward the age where he and his family will be planning for a post-HS transition into a group home setting and/or sheltered workshop, we have been focusing on an increasing amount of life skills and communication skills with him, and all his learning, academic and otherwise, is getting more and more focused on real-world applications (identifying different sums of money, counting change, simple computer applications, working various household appliances, standing an appropriate measure of distance from a person when trying to get his or her attention and talking to him or her, etc.) He is big on a self-talk, the chatter that some others mention, but his speech-language pathologist has noted that this is really a normal thing, given all the work we are doing with him on using full sentences, and increasing his intelligibility. He's more or less "practicing" all the time in his head, and sometimes that comes out.
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Old 02-07-2009, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,807,188 times
Reputation: 6195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nancy Anne View Post
NewToCa,

I know it was almost 2 years ago you posted that link, but I found it very helpful in explaining some of the "different" behaviors that my adult son (he's 21- almost done with high school!) has been exhibiting. I'm still worried that the trouble with making eye contact and need to self-stim are indicative of something other than Down's, but at least now I know that the incessant talking to himself is normal. Even if it does drive his sisters nutz!

Thanks again,

Nancy Anne
Glad you found it helpful, it is a tough subject for those dealing with it, and we don't get a road map!
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Old 07-15-2009, 10:45 AM
 
1 posts, read 4,346 times
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Post Continuing education for adults with down syndrome or any other learning disability

Does anyone know of any continuing educational/literacy programs for adults with Down Syndrome? My husband and I care for my 34 year old brother Brian who has Down Syndrome. I am 14 years older that Brian and got married when Brian was five and subsequently joined the Air Force. Prior to moving back to Georgia in 2002 to help care for our ailing parents who are now both deceased, I only saw Brian during my annual summer/holiday visits. Now that Brian lives fulltime with me, I realize that he has the ability to learn to read, but can't although he has a high school diploma. Brian attended/graduated in 1994 from a school system that had limited understanding and resources for teaching children with learning disabilities. In the county we currently live in, there are currently no programs that offer continuing education for adults such as Brian. Most organizations are willing to teach him work skills, but not literacy. I believe that literacy should be as much a priority to Brian as it was for me and my other siblings who were not born with Down Syndrome. If there are no known programs for continuing literacy education for adults such as Brian, does anyone know how to assist me with seeking legislature to ensure that "lifetime" literacy programs are made available to individuals such as Brian who may be more prone to learn to read at age 34 than between ages 6 to 21? Regardles of age of readiness, "lifetime" literacy programs would help ensure each individual is able to learn when both ready and able, whether that be at age 3 or age 120. Please advise.
Regards,
Sheila D. Howard,
[EMAIL="mybizisyourbiz@yahoo.com"]mybizisyourbiz@yahoo.com[/EMAIL]
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Old 07-17-2009, 11:54 AM
 
Location: west of Milwaukee, Wi
105 posts, read 308,247 times
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I agree with Esya's post!
1) I have never heard that Mood Swings are inherent to DS, nor have we experienced 'mood swings' with my son. This type of behavior could be caused by many things.
2) Our 23 year old son too, understands more than he can express, and we have had to instill a confidence in him to 'say it again', or 'try it again', which has gotten better as he has grown into maturity. It still frustrates him when he isn't understood....and I find myself 'repeating' what he said to others who don't know him. Transitions have gotten easier too, as he's gotten older. He knows he is a man now, and he tries his best to behave and handle things (to quote him)....'like a man would do".

To the original poster..thanks for starting this thread.
Raising a Down's Syndrome child is a challenge and a blessing, and I wouldn't trade him, or the experience, for the world!
(Did I mention "STUBBORN"???...I maybe could have traded that part!!)
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