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Old 11-08-2007, 07:38 PM
 
2,153 posts, read 4,702,193 times
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Help!!!!

We are struggling with getting our 4 yr. old potty trained. He is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder and it really doesn't seem to bother him when he has an accident. Anyone have any tips?
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
1,078 posts, read 3,318,047 times
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bls, we told out AS son that 3 year olds do not potty in their pants anymore (before that it was pointless). So, after he turned three, on his b-day he went to regular underwear.
And had only once accident.
Seems simplistic, but he had to have a specific time, to do it.

MBG
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Old 12-27-2007, 01:11 PM
 
17 posts, read 90,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midnightbirdgirl View Post
bls, we told out AS son that 3 year olds do not potty in their pants anymore (before that it was pointless). So, after he turned three, on his b-day he went to regular underwear.
And had only once accident.
Seems simplistic, but he had to have a specific time, to do it.

MBG
With all due respect, I don't think this approach will work for most kids on the spectrum. My son is 5 and still not trained. I've heard different approaches from different people, it really is an individual thing, just as our children are each unique.

Here are some websites that may help:
http://www.talkaboutcuringautism.org...y-training.htm
http://www0.epinions.com/content_4025262212
http://www.behavioradvisor.com/Autism&Toileting.html (broken link) (scroll all the way down for very specific example of how one family went about this!)

It all depends on where your child is at. There are pre-requisite behaviors that need to be mastered before they are even ready to begin. We're working on those things now.

Best of luck!
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Old 12-31-2007, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Washington
57 posts, read 212,725 times
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I hear all of you - my 4 yr old autistic boy doesn't interest or bother him - except when people try to get him on the potty. It's fine for others, he think, but not for him. My 3 yr old autistic boy has no clue, pretty much like an infant in that regard.

Thanks for the website!
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Old 01-01-2008, 01:34 AM
 
Location: Eastern PA
1,263 posts, read 4,107,697 times
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I have two boys with special needs. Both were almost 5 yrs old until they were potty trained.

With my oldest, who has Asperger's, the timer method finally worked. I would set a timer and when he heard the timer ring, he would run to the potty and sit until something happened. I have now heard of a special timer "watch" the child actually wears to signal when to go to the bathroom. I believe I saw it in the One Step Ahead catalog.

With my second, who has SPD, he would get too engrossed in his activities and didn't mind feeling wet or soiled. For him, it helped literally having a small potty in every room of the house so he could go as the mood struck him. I also did a lot of "naked time" with him to make going as easy as possible.
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Old 01-11-2008, 12:47 PM
 
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Karen,

There is no set way to do this. All our kids are different.
Here's a good way to make a start though....assuming the child is not in nappies/diapers otherwise you'll never do it......

1/ Forget the potty - go straight to the toilet.
2/ After a big drink - say 30 mins, take your child to toilet and see if they go.
3/ If yes - time to make a big fuss (positive reinforcement!) - whoops of joy/well done/etc. Then give them a treat....a chocholate (GFCF in our case).
4/ Any accidents - completely ignore this, change them - don't get wound up.


Now another consideration, many kids have sensory issues in their bladders etc. and simply don't feel themselves weeing until it's too late. We found l-glutathione (yucky - so mixed with a gfcf syrup!) given orally began slowly to help with detox and improved things.
I don't know what other things you are doing to treat your boy, but check out [URL="http://www.trueparenting.co.uk"]Child autism - autism treatment and recovery help.[/URL] for guidance.

Good Luck

Last edited by TrueGroup; 01-11-2008 at 12:48 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 01-11-2008, 07:15 PM
 
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My son took til he was 8 but the #2 is still an issue but no more pullups in school!

Yes!!!
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Old 01-12-2008, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Eastern PA
1,263 posts, read 4,107,697 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottdavis View Post
My son took til he was 8 but the #2 is still an issue but no more pullups in school!

Yes!!!
I am so happy for you! When I hear stories like this I am truly GRATEFUL my boys were able to manage near age 5.

I'm certainly not asserting the methods I used will work for everyone - they simply were the ones that worked for my two high-needs yet very different boys.
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Old 01-17-2008, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Pa
20,317 posts, read 17,718,175 times
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My daughter took the better part of 18 years... She would use the toilet to pee but was so retentive about bowl movements. She would hold and hold until a little would escape at a time in her pants.
Then the nightmare:
She stopped drinking fluids....
To the doctor we went. She lived with her mom and well thats all I'll say about that.
She was impacted to the size of a softball....
Her bowl was torn and she needed surgery. 5 gallons of that Colite stuff later she was finally cleaned out. She had to have a tube put into her stomach and we gave her fluids through that. Not her mom of course because the tube isn't natural. ( 3 different doctors filed medical neglect complaints against mom) ( Children and youth services didn't assign any case numbers).
NICE...
I ended up taking her from the home and fighting a bunch of legal battles. She is now mine alone.
She is now toilet trained completely. She drinks fluids with the best of us.
A book I would recommend. Autism a fathers story by Bill Davis. Absolutely the best book I have yet to read on autism.
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Old 01-17-2008, 10:27 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,354 posts, read 5,405,734 times
Reputation: 1248
Tinman, what a sad story. I am glad your daughter is in your home now, how scary. She is a lucky girl.
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