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Old 09-12-2013, 10:51 AM
 
27 posts, read 71,809 times
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My child is enrolled in K in NJ and has an IEP. He is HFA and is in inclusion class (with an aide). he is getting ST, OT and PT services one/twice a week. I wanted to ask other parents, how they keep themselves informed of the services that the child is getting in school? how do you make sure they really provide the promised services each week? Is there a way that school communicates the services that are provided on daily basis (just a note that - you child went to so and so service today). how does school (including ST, PT and OT) provide communication and feedback to parents on how it is going for the child and if they recommend some points for home program? I am sure we dont want to wait for reports that come out every 12 weeks to learn if the IEP goals are on track or not? Just trying to figure out if this a constant feedback mechanism is something a school will do by themselves or I should make it as part of IEP (don't want to make it a big deal but I do want to keep myself informed of it)? If school can keep the parents informed, parents can also try to reinforce some things on ST, OT and PT front.

also, I asked for ABA services in IEP and they said it is not effective for HFA. I am not quite sure if that is correct. can you tell me how I can fight this? likewise for Social skills training. Does your school have a special program for Social skills,. Right now they said, one in 15 days they will have a social skills thing during recess. its like 30 mins in two weeks time. I don't think that will be effective. It would be nice to hear your experiences and the kind of programs your child's school has.
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Old 09-12-2013, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Hillsborough
2,825 posts, read 5,953,202 times
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My daughter gets ST 2x30 per week, PT 1x30 per week, and special education 5x60 per week in an inclusion class. We have a communication notebook. Each time she has therapy, they write a sentence or two or three in her notebook about what they worked on and how she did and anything they'd like us to reinforce at home. Her teacher also writes ~1-2x per week (not every day) about what they are working on in regards to her IEP. There is also a therapist who comes for social skills once per week and works with the whole class, IEP or not. She does not write in our book, but she does send home handouts.

A friend of ours has a child in an autism classroom and his teacher writes in his notebook daily. She also takes pictures (using his iPad) of things he is doing throughout the day, which helps him tell his parents about his day when he gets home because they can scroll through the pictures together. I think that all of the kids in the autism classroom have iPads.
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:21 AM
 
12,454 posts, read 27,069,551 times
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Moved from the education forum. OP, please feel free to post in either forum, but this does seem to be a better place for this specific subject.
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Last edited by Jaded; 09-14-2013 at 02:00 PM..
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Old 09-13-2013, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,881,813 times
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You can request the teacher gives you weekly progress reports on your child.
You can also request a parent-teacher conferences at regular intervals.
And keep doing that until you feel comfortable that the school is doing what they are supposed to be doing.
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Old 09-15-2013, 12:40 AM
 
95 posts, read 134,995 times
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The therapists for my daughter would send home worksheets for us to work on at home. This reinforced what they were working on at school. My daughter needed us to be on the same page. If I did something different then what her therapist was doing, she would have a meltdown. Call each therapist and talk with them about what is going on and if they can send things home for you to work on. Getting to know them really makes a difference.
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Old 09-15-2013, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kapil_takeit_easy View Post
My child is enrolled in K in NJ and has an IEP. He is HFA and is in inclusion class (with an aide). he is getting ST, OT and PT services one/twice a week. I wanted to ask other parents, how they keep themselves informed of the services that the child is getting in school? how do you make sure they really provide the promised services each week? Is there a way that school communicates the services that are provided on daily basis (just a note that - you child went to so and so service today). how does school (including ST, PT and OT) provide communication and feedback to parents on how it is going for the child and if they recommend some points for home program? I am sure we dont want to wait for reports that come out every 12 weeks to learn if the IEP goals are on track or not? Just trying to figure out if this a constant feedback mechanism is something a school will do by themselves or I should make it as part of IEP (don't want to make it a big deal but I do want to keep myself informed of it)? If school can keep the parents informed, parents can also try to reinforce some things on ST, OT and PT front.


also, I asked for ABA services in IEP and they said it is not effective for HFA. I am not quite sure if that is correct. can you tell me how I can fight this? likewise for Social skills training. Does your school have a special program for Social skills,. Right now they said, one in 15 days they will have a social skills thing during recess. its like 30 mins in two weeks time. I don't think that will be effective. It would be nice to hear your experiences and the kind of programs your child's school has.

Have not read any other reponses, but here's how it is from my standpoint, which is that of a special education teacher at a school that provides ABA therapy, and is therefore intensely data-driven in procedures.

Our students receive updated home communication notes every day, detailing the programs, IEP goals, and IEP objectives that were run throughout the course of their day, as well as numeric data on performance, including special services-related goals and objectives. These notes may go home in a binder, may be e-mailed per parent request, or both. Our therapists typically perform therapy embedded in the programming of a child's day (e.g. an SLP will go to lunch with student, and run receptive language goals while the student is performing functional, meaningful tasks, will run pragmatic language goals while the student is engaging in leisure activities with peers, etc.). We also send detailed therapy notes provided by our on-staff therapists weekly, and report on progress monthly, in addition to the daily sharing of data. We put what is run, how the student performs, percentage-wise on various targets, what reinforcers were accessed, if there was any unwanted behavior exhibited, what the antecedent was...all the data you could hope for.

You can definitely request that communication of completed therapy minutes be done regularly. It can also be put into writing in the parental concerns section of the present levels of academic achievement and functional performance portion of the IEP document. I have students whose families prefer a "touching base" meeting monthly. These are not IEP review or amendment meetings, and are not required by the school but are requested by families that are more comfortable being a more active part of the team than just annual IEP reviews (I also have families that it's pulling teeth to get to come in once a year FOR those reviews, so it cuts both ways).

Overall, communication of how programming is going regularly is very important, as it allows parents to set up situations where their kids can work on compatible targets in the home, thus generalizing skills.

It's not true that ABA "won't work" for HFA (which is a misnomer, anyway). ABA is very effective for students with any degree of autism (and for modifying behavior in individuals without autism/special needs, as well). Applied correctly and consistently, the principles of applied behavior analysis can be put to use to change any behavior in any organism, from a child with autism to kids on the baseball team you coach, to coworker teams, to your spouse, to your dog. Many schools are not well-informed about what ABA actually is, or how to incorporate its various implementations, and misinformation gets around this way. A certified ABA provider would know that ABA does not = "discrete trials and edible reinforcers," but some people who are unfamiliar/untrained seem to think it does. This is incorrect. Another factor is that ABA therapy is expensive and requires specially trained and certified individuals, in order to encourage that it is being performed correctly and with oversight, and for many public schools, it is easier to say, "Oh, it won't work for your kid, he/she is too high-functioning," but that's not actually accurate. ABA, done correctly and consistently, actually is effective in decreasing unwanted behavior and increasing desired behavior, no matter level of disability, or even presence of disability. It's just operant conditioning, it's not something special for people with autism. It's just highly effective in changing rigid behavior patters in people with autism. I can see where your school many not WANT to provide ABA therapy (the aforementioned cost), but it's simply not true that "Well, it won't work, it's only for low kids/nonverbal kids/etc."

Social skills programming...this is the most concerning issue in your post. Pragmatic language programming needs to be run EVERY DAY. Embedded in pretty much everything the student does, in addition to more intensive therapy, social skills groups, etc. Consistency and regularity is key. A half hour every two weeks is worthless, if that's all that's happening. Also, it doesn't take an SLP to run social skills goals and objectives. It doesn't take "special speech time" to run social skills goals and objectives. Everyone the student comes into contact with should be running social skills goals and objectives, in every interaction they have with the student. So should the parents. It should be a built-in part of the day, a built-in part of life. Social skills often have to be learned by rote, with kids with autism at any level. You can't improve with out practice. Lots and lots and lots of targeted practice. A couple of short sessions of focused therapy a month will not cut it. Better to use consultative therapy time to develop programming that can be run by others, and training the others interspersed throughout the day outside of targeted therapy time.
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