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Old 02-29-2016, 07:23 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,635 times
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Hello! I am looking to relocate in summer time out of florida due to lack of services programs and activities for my daughter whom is severely autistic. I have had no luck here and at the end of my rope. My daughter is on the medicaid cms insurance and will most likely stay on this type of insurance. My question at this time is where and what city in the u.s. have the best therapies resources parent training classes and activities for myself and my child to have a more manageable and happier life while dealing with her disability as the top priority? I understand that this is a broad question but your thoughts and suggestions would be most helpful at this time as i am trying to combat this disability head on and am looking for success for her. She currently recieves ot and speech therapy but not nearly enough. She is nonverbal and incontinent. I believe i can turn her life around..slowly but surely! I am in a position to relocate anywhere in the u.s. but do have to live in an affordable area since i only make about 1800.00 per month. All your guidance suggestions and help is greatly appreciated!!
Sincerely
Lost
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Old 03-01-2016, 11:29 AM
 
3 posts, read 6,809 times
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Well when moving there are several factors to consider. I might not live in the US but I do know a few things about autistic children as I am an autistic person myself. If your daughter has sensory issues then a large, noisy and bustling city is not the best place but you might want to live somewhere a couple of miles away from a city so any facilities that are not available directly where you live aren't too far away. You don't want to go anywhere too small because in reasonably sized towns you would find it easier to become a part of a disabled community which can help you find access to resources you may not have been aware of. Usually places that are more supportive of disabled people are in areas that are generally more liberal than conservative so you might want to look at California, Washington, New York, Hawaii, Vermont, Oregon, Minnesota, Ohio or any of the states that are generally liberal. You might not want to completely rule out more conservative places because they can have quite tight knit communities but you might find some people who are somewhat intolerant due to their strict religious lifestyles which would be upsetting (there is a reason why Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas and Montana are generally found to be the worst states for people with disabilities to live). Arizona has been rated as supporting the best quality of life for people with disabilities but again might not be the best for your daughter if she has sensory issues due to the climate, although she might find it manageable seeing as she is living in Florida at the moment. The next top rated states are Missouri, Maryland and New York. City areas that have been rated as the best for people with autism to live include Chicago, New York, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Boston. I hope this helps.
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Old 03-01-2016, 06:40 PM
 
15,287 posts, read 16,828,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FangedCat View Post
Well when moving there are several factors to consider. I might not live in the US but I do know a few things about autistic children as I am an autistic person myself. If your daughter has sensory issues then a large, noisy and bustling city is not the best place but you might want to live somewhere a couple of miles away from a city so any facilities that are not available directly where you live aren't too far away. You don't want to go anywhere too small because in reasonably sized towns you would find it easier to become a part of a disabled community which can help you find access to resources you may not have been aware of. Usually places that are more supportive of disabled people are in areas that are generally more liberal than conservative so you might want to look at California, Washington, New York, Hawaii, Vermont, Oregon, Minnesota, Ohio or any of the states that are generally liberal. You might not want to completely rule out more conservative places because they can have quite tight knit communities but you might find some people who are somewhat intolerant due to their strict religious lifestyles which would be upsetting (there is a reason why Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas and Montana are generally found to be the worst states for people with disabilities to live). Arizona has been rated as supporting the best quality of life for people with disabilities but again might not be the best for your daughter if she has sensory issues due to the climate, although she might find it manageable seeing as she is living in Florida at the moment. The next top rated states are Missouri, Maryland and New York. City areas that have been rated as the best for people with autism to live include Chicago, New York, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Boston. I hope this helps.
You are not seriously suggesting Missouri.

The best states are actually Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Minnesota. Some of these places have a high cost of living though. Florida is one of the worst states for services. California can be good, but it depends on the area and money is tighter now than it used to be. Washington is also not good even in the bigger cities.

You may know quite a bit about autism and autistic children, but you have little knowledge of services in the US.
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Old 03-03-2016, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,466 posts, read 15,905,878 times
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I live in one very nice suburb of a large city in Wisconsin and taught special education in the suburb next to it. After I retired I was a sub teacher in both suburbs. They both had excellent, excellent special education services but it depended on what the parent was looking for and what the parent valued.

Suburb A had almost 100% full inclusion for all levels of special education at the elementary level. You could have mild needs, such as mild learning disability or mild autism or mild cognitive disabilities and be fully included for all academics in the regular classroom. Or you could have slightly more needs and have a very limited amount of pullout.

Or you could have very significant delays and needs, for example, be chronologically a 5th grader, totally non-verbal, tube-fed, in diapers and functioning at a six month level and spend almost your entire school day with your same age peers. They were listening to and "participating in" all of the 5th grade reading, math, social studies and science, etc. Some parents loved this and thought that this was the absolutely best special education program in the world and other parents disliked it immensely.


Suburb B had some resource rooms for children with moderate or severe special educational needs. Most children with mild special education needs were in the regular classrooms !00% of the time, fully included. Other children spend most of the day in regular ed with some pull-out and other children with significant delays and needs spend much of the day in special education classrooms. They were learning more functional and adaptive skills. 5th grade social studies to a back seat to skills & activities related to their cognitive functioning. Some parents loved this and thought that this was the absolutely best special education program in the world and other parents disliked it immensely.


So, as a parent, you need to decide what you feel is the best program for your child.

Last edited by germaine2626; 03-03-2016 at 01:22 PM..
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Old 03-19-2016, 05:15 PM
 
61 posts, read 84,557 times
Reputation: 26
Dear Lost,

I really feel for you and hope you can find the help that you need! Since you are in FL, have you tried to get any info about the Dan Marino Center for Autism in Miami? Also the Collier County School system seemed really good to me when I got in touch with them. Call around and ask a lot of questions. The more questions you ask the better. Jacksonville area is another area to look into and call around.

In the North East you will find an abundance of great services. The cost of living is high in NY, NJ, MA and even PA is expensive too. Some counties can help you financially though so even though they are expensive to live in, you can get some assistance with your bills. The VNA in Montgomery County PA can help with this. I would look into Bucks County PA for schools and services and I feel its better then Montgomery County.

Get in touch with the nationwide organization called ARC. They are located in many counties in NY and NJ especially and they can help you to navigate this and find out what is available. There is plenty of help available in the NE. NYC is especially expensive but has an abundance of help for someone like your daughter. You may qualify for housing assistance of some sort, so I wouldn't rule out any areas based on your income.

The whole state of NY offers incredible home based services and you have to find out what school districts will suit your daughter's needs. NY doesn't have a waiting list for services so you can get help relatively quickly.

PA is far less than generous with home based help although the schools can be suitable and the cost of living can be acceptable.

I would first try in your home state to find out from many different counties what is available because it will be quite a culture shock to move up to the North East.

I really hope you can find something that will suit your daughter and your income. Its always hard to get the whole puzzle to fit together and find a good fit. If you need more guidance, please ask!
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Old 05-17-2016, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
5,843 posts, read 8,423,141 times
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Default Look into AZ

Sorry I didn't see your post earlier.

I worked for the Dept of Developmental Delays here for 10 years. AZ has very good autism and other disability resources. Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center (SARRC) can help you immensely. And your child would qualify for ALTCs, which is Arizona Long Term Care, and covers intensive ABA, and other therapies such as speech, OT, PT, and respite for you. This state has made vast improvements to its developmental programs and puts alot of $$$ into them.

See the website: www.AZDES.gov and look up DDD. Division of Developmental Delays. You can also get help in the schools (public) or you can enroll your child in a special school.

BTW: It's pretty cheap living here. Taxes are low. Housing is decent. Good luck to you.
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Old 05-17-2016, 07:08 PM
 
5,563 posts, read 7,635,104 times
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New York by far has the best services and resources.

ETA this goes beyond school and covers services for family support and into adulthood.
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Old 05-19-2016, 08:23 PM
 
25 posts, read 26,423 times
Reputation: 20
There are a lot of services in the Chapel Hill, NC area, but I think a lot of people move to the Ada in search of them as well.
Carolina Institute for Developmental Delays always has a lot of things to offer parents.
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Old 06-06-2016, 05:30 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,211 times
Reputation: 10
Default Pennsylvania

Montgomery County Pennsylvania is a suburb of Philadelphia. The best resource for Autism is Children's Hospital of Philadelphia CHOP. It would make sense to move close to CHOP. The Indian Creek Foundation is really good for TASP which is the after school program and it has wrap around services for kids that are paid for by the State under Autism support for welfare.

The public schools in Montgomery County PA are pretty good but they are not great for Autism support for high functioning kids unless they can test into the Gifted program.

Private schools don't have to cater to special needs so it is tough to get great support. I think that The TASP program at the Indian Creek Foundation is really good.
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Old 12-17-2016, 03:31 AM
 
1 posts, read 4,731 times
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upstate New York is very good. low cost if living due to the long harsh cold winters and tons of services. we have an 8yr old with autism. we moved out of nyc to ithaca Ny. been here 2 yrs and my son is showing some improvements. Nyc was ok with services but at the end of the day the teachers dont seem to care about the kids like they do here.
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