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Old 12-10-2008, 07:19 AM
 
Location: In an alternate universe according to some, AKA Aspergers
19,099 posts, read 18,986,611 times
Reputation: 13273

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
<groan>

Or Pokemon....
Been there! Or the new pop art mountain dew bottles My son has a whole shelf of them, or nascar stuff, he has a whole shelf of cars all lined up by number and god forbid if we touch them...
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Old 01-23-2017, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities
3,549 posts, read 7,428,411 times
Reputation: 5902
UPDATE:

It's been just over 8 years since she was diagnosed with what is now termed, high functioning autism instead of aspbergers syndrome. The teen years are tough and being on the spectrum makes it even tougher. She will be 18 in a few months and has grown and changed from that girl I first posted about. She has had to work hard to interact with kids her own age. She's always felt more comfortable with adults. She's had an amazing therapist and doctor. While many people told us how awful we were for putting her on medications, as her parents we know what is best for her. It took a long time to find the right balance of meds but we finally did and it's made a world of difference. It is very obvious when she has forgotten to take her meds for a few days. She is a completely different person. She sees it and feels it too.

There are so many great social media groups that my wife and I have joined. The local groups just didn't work out for us as most were simply too expensive to join and many were just not relevant since this form of autism affects boys more than girls. There is however a local nonprofit offers drivers education specifically for kids with autism. While she does not want a driver's license it's nice to know that it's out there when she decides it's time.

In elementary and middle school she was involved in the special education program and it helped out quite a bit. Getting an IEP from the school was the most important thing we did for her. However, when it was time for high school we knew it was going to be really rough for her with the loud noises in the hallways, much larger school. It was beyond overwhelming for her so we decided to homeschool her. That was a life change for us but she has blossomed in ways she never would have had she been in traditional school. I left the marketing industry and took a job in food service so I could be there for her while my wife continued to work her full-time job. I'd say the sacrifice was well worth it however I don't look at it as a sacrifice. It's been a gift to spend so much time with her these past four years. She won't be heading off to college so we are updating our lower level so she can have a bedroom for a young adult and be connected to online schools.


Families with kids on the autism spectrum have such a wonderful life ahead of them. It's challenging, yes, but so is raising any child. No instructions, just learn as you go. Many people have felt bad for us that we have to deal with this "problem" in our lives. She is not defined by her autism. It's an aspect of her but life does not revolve around that diagnosis. She's an amazing young woman who loves the Lord and her faith is stronger than anyone I've ever seen. She's a gifted photographer and loves graphic design. She's an outstanding older sister to a teenage brother who is just entering high school. They're great friends, but still normal brother and sister issues. If your child is diagnosed with autism you are in for an amazing and wonderful life.
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Old 02-22-2017, 08:20 PM
 
127 posts, read 186,255 times
Reputation: 91
Glad you came back to update! Thank you!
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Old 02-22-2017, 08:41 PM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,698 posts, read 8,471,391 times
Reputation: 3363
Wonderful post and great parents you are!
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Old 03-01-2017, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
13,464 posts, read 6,806,683 times
Reputation: 18702
Thank you for a wonderful update. I wish ongoing success and happiness to your daughter and your whole family.
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Old 03-01-2017, 06:45 PM
 
1,888 posts, read 846,830 times
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Great update! I have a 14 yo (15 next week!) on the spectrum, and it can be so challenging. But I wouldn't change him for the world. I was really pissed at the adults who would say stuff like "I'm so sorry..." as if he was dead when he got diagnosed. Don't pity me! But I also recognize that I have a son who is very capable, and who can do well with less extensive supports. I realize that many, many parents have children who have much more difficulty and face challenges we don't have (e.g., nonverbal child, low cognitive functioning, excessive disruptive behaviors, etc.). They may not have the same feeling about the experience of having a child on the spectrum as I do.

Wishing your daughter many a wonderful future
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Old 03-01-2017, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Middle America
32,749 posts, read 34,262,382 times
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Good update!
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:58 AM
 
176 posts, read 187,915 times
Reputation: 195
A family member has Aspergers. God blessed him with a special gift. He is a genius. Developed encryption software that was purchased by the government (he's an engineer). Yes he's shy, doesn't do the idle chit chat, gossiping nonsense, never says a negative thing about anyone. His passion is nature...hiking, kayaking, Sierra Club activites.

Wishing your family all the best
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Old 03-28-2017, 02:32 PM
 
1,313 posts, read 362,259 times
Reputation: 2738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
<groan>

Or Pokemon....

Or Mario Brothers.


Or Legend of Zelda. LOL


My grown son has Aspergers. For the most part, you wouldn't be able to tell...NOW.


By the time high school rolled around, something changed, and he generally just 'fit in' better. Kids accepted him (he was even on a school dance royal court.)


But up to high school, times were tough. We weren't sure what we were dealing with. He wasn't diagnosed until he was 15.
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Old 05-21-2017, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Coventry.
10,471 posts, read 6,506,536 times
Reputation: 13780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Movie Lover View Post
Having it myself, the special needs label came and went. Its more on the Bipolar edge, aka, depression and mega violent behaviours.

Just be thankful you live in the US, here in the UK there is little to no help and stupid lil me has been waiting 2 years for the social worker to come visit my house.
Not easy to get a diagnosis either, or even get anyone to give you their time to try.

Could be what led to the depression, and violent behaviour.
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