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Old 11-27-2008, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
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My nine year old daughter was diagnosed with Aspergers a few months ago. My wife and I are adjusting to the news and trying to figure out how to help our daughter, and to better understand her. Academically she's a whiz. Socially, she's left behind. Is Asperger's considered special needs and what type of programs are out there to help my wife and I? We've got some great programs for our daughter, just have to get her involved.
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Old 11-28-2008, 03:37 AM
 
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Having it myself, the special needs label came and went. Its more on the Bipolar edge, aka, depression and mega violent behaviours.

Just be thankful you live in the US, here in the UK there is little to no help and stupid lil me has been waiting 2 years for the social worker to come visit my house.
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Old 11-28-2008, 09:18 AM
 
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You need to discuss this diagnosis with your child's school so they are aware of what is going on. Just because a child is doing okay in school, it doesn't mean they don't need special services in school. My son, who is bipolar and gifted, has an IEP. This provides for him legal protection in the school setting. It requires the school to provide accomodations for him so he can be in the regular school setting. Often times, if our kids are doing okay academically, we don't think there is a need for an IEP, but there is. And you never know what will happen in the future.
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Old 12-05-2008, 06:13 AM
 
Location: In an alternate universe according to some, AKA Aspergers
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My son is an aspergers child and yes they qualify for either and IEP or a 504. He currently is seeing a speech therapist at school in order to teach him how to relate to people, set up pre-determined/scripted responses to situations that have always baffled him and to teach him how to discern the difference between joking and serious.
I suggest the IEP since it has more teeth in it and is more enforceable.
Good luck!
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Old 12-06-2008, 01:48 AM
 
Location: NC
484 posts, read 1,112,817 times
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Default Asbergers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Movie Lover View Post
Having it myself, the special needs label came and went. Its more on the Bipolar edge, aka, depression and mega violent behaviours.

Just be thankful you live in the US, here in the UK there is little to no help and stupid lil me has been waiting 2 years for the social worker to come visit my house.
I never heard off Asbergers being on the bi polar depression or violent edge. Please correct me if I'm wrong? Asbergers is more of Social situation issues, isnt it?
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Old 12-06-2008, 06:27 AM
 
Location: In an alternate universe according to some, AKA Aspergers
19,099 posts, read 18,986,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamsncharms View Post
I never heard off Asbergers being on the bi polar depression or violent edge. Please correct me if I'm wrong? Asbergers is more of Social situation issues, isnt it?
You're pretty much on target. There's also some motor skill issues and delayed communication from the brain to action.
The following is from the Autisim Society of America:

What distinguishes Asperger's Disorder from Autism Disorder is the severity of the symptoms and the absence of language delays. Children with Asperger's Disorder may be only mildly affected and frequently have good language and cognitive skills. To the untrained observer, a child with Asperger's Disorder may just seem like a normal child behaving differently.

Children with autism are frequently seen as aloof and uninterested in others. This is not the case with Asperger's Disorder. Individuals with Asperger's Disorder usually want to fit in and have interaction with others; they simply don't know how to do it. They may be socially awkward, not understanding of conventional social rules, or show a lack of empathy. They may have limited eye contact, seem to be unengaged in a conversation, and not understand the use of gestures.

Interests in a particular subject may border on the obsessive. Children with Asperger's Disorder frequently like to collect categories of things, such as rocks or bottle caps. They may be proficient in knowing categories of information, such as baseball statistics or Latin names of flowers. While they may have good rote memory skills, they have difficulty with abstract concepts.

One of the major differences between Asperger's Disorder and autism is that, by definition, there is no speech delay in Asperger's. In fact, children with Asperger's Disorder frequently have good language skills; they simply use language in different ways. Speech patterns may be unusual, lack inflection or have a rhythmic nature, or it may be formal, but too loud or high pitched. Children with Asperger's Disorder may not understand the subtleties of language, such as irony and humor, or they may not understand the give-and- take nature of a conversation.

Another distinction between Asperger's Disorder and autism concerns cognitive ability. While some individuals with autism experience mental retardation, by definition a person with Asperger's Disorder cannot possess a "clinically significant" cognitive delay and most possess average to above average intelligence.

While motor difficulties are not a specific criteria for Asperger's, children with Asperger's Disorder frequently have motor skill delays and may appear clumsy or awkward.
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Old 12-07-2008, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamsncharms View Post
I never heard off Asbergers being on the bi polar depression or violent edge. Please correct me if I'm wrong? Asbergers is more of Social situation issues, isnt it?
Aspergers is not related to bipolar/depression. It generally relates to a problem in social functioning. And Aspergers, just as virtually every disorder, is in no way related to violence.
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Old 12-07-2008, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Aspergers is on the autistic spectrum. An easy description to separate the two ends of the spectrum would be that an autistic person turns socially inward and an aspergers person is socially outward, but doesn't know quite how to fit in, so they are considered odd by others. I have a daughter who has been diagnosed with Aspergers and people just don't understand her...but she has a big heart. However, as with all autistic diagnosis, there are many degrees of functioning and some individuals are only minimally impaired while others are severely impaired.
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 5,796,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Movie Lover View Post
Having it myself, the special needs label came and went. Its more on the Bipolar edge, aka, depression and mega violent behaviours.

Just be thankful you live in the US, here in the UK there is little to no help and stupid lil me has been waiting 2 years for the social worker to come visit my house.
Asperger's is an autism spectrum disorder, not a mood disorder. There may be cases where ASDs and one or another mood disorder are comorbid, but they are absolutely not the same.
Nor are persons with Asperger's necessarily violent and depressed. As the saying goes: "If you've seen one kid with AS...you've seen one kid with AS."
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Old 12-09-2008, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 5,796,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
Interests in a particular subject may border on the obsessive. Children with Asperger's Disorder frequently like to collect categories of things, such as rocks or bottle caps.

<groan>

Or Pokemon....
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