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Old 01-21-2009, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Pelion, South Carolina/orig. from Cape May, NJ
1,115 posts, read 2,215,521 times
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I have a 5 year-old daughter with autism. She is non-verbal, and as a result gets very aggressive and hard to control when she can't communicate her needs or must transition from one thing to another-example: playing with her toys, then having to go to bed. Sometimes I am at my wit's end (I also have a 4 year-old and a 7 month old- both typically-developing kids) and I wonder if anyone else out there with an autistic child must sometimes resort to medication to be able to handle them. I hate having to do that, but if anyone can offer any help I'd appreciate it. Thanks so much.
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Old 01-21-2009, 11:53 PM
 
707 posts, read 708,762 times
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Hey there, look up a company called Melalucca, they have an herbal vitamin supplement that my mother has used for my autistic brother. Its an alternative that might be worth the look at if you don't want to go the typical chemical route, and it does work, when he takes it.
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Old 01-22-2009, 01:15 PM
 
733 posts, read 1,230,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jersgrl1969 View Post
I have a 5 year-old daughter with autism. She is non-verbal, and as a result gets very aggressive and hard to control when she can't communicate her needs or must transition from one thing to another-example: playing with her toys, then having to go to bed. Sometimes I am at my wit's end (I also have a 4 year-old and a 7 month old- both typically-developing kids) and I wonder if anyone else out there with an autistic child must sometimes resort to medication to be able to handle them. I hate having to do that, but if anyone can offer any help I'd appreciate it. Thanks so much.
I Have autistic twin boys, one of whom sounds much like your girl. We didn't have to start medication until they were about 10, they are 12 now. Both are non-verbal, and severely autistic.

What we did is try and figure out what was the trigger. Then we would try to redirect with something that was enough of a distraction to get their attention. Depending on how much she understands, it may be that an ABA therapy approach might help you. (Sort of the "if , then" contingency). We also would use SI therapy.

But as puberty started to set in we needed to get a hold of the situation quickly. As one of my boys became self abusive, and we were told by others (as well as seeing ourselves) that it looked like he was "suffering" from anxiety and it was like he wanted to crawl out of his skin.

With my one son who got physically aggressive towards others, we put him on Risperidone and he has been doing great. The Risperidone doesn't work for my other son. It is an on going process for him, though we think we have something now that helps. He was the one who got self abusive, can't concentrate and can't transition. He initially was on Zoloft. It helped for a while, but over time was less effective. We now have him on Strattera. That seems to help him get a bit more focused. He does take some new meds for evening to help him sleep and help him be more calm.

At 5 however, maybe you can find some help thru therapies, and or behavioral modification. It isn't that unusual for a 5 year old to start becoming difficult. It's one of those stages they go thru.

I hope things get easier for you. Try your state services, and if yo have a good rapport with your school, maybe they can help.
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Old 01-27-2009, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
22 posts, read 42,631 times
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Have you started any types of behavioral therapy? I know you have your hands full, but medication seems more like a last resort, your child is going to have to learn as best as possible how to cope with transitioning and behavioral therapy like floortime or ABA etc will help. I am dealing with the same thing my self currently. Do you PECS or any thing ? Perhaps using a PECS schedule on the wall for her she to let her know "what comes next" in order to help her transition into the next activity... or try telling her "okay you have 5 more minutes to play with toys then bathtime" and try using an egg timer, she may not "get it" at first but with repetion she will and reward her when she transitions well etc.... In the meantime have you thought of hiring a "mother's helper" maybe a college student or high school kid studying special needs / early childhood that can help you with your daughter a few hours a day when you have your hands full?
What services is your daughter getting right now with the school district etc??

My daughter is 4 & 1/2 and I babysat and infant and another NT toddler the other night and OMG it was harder than I imagined! I feel for you! I have 2 sons but they are grown 20 & 18 and live away from me now.
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:22 AM
 
Location: (Lyndon) Louisville KY USA
5,715 posts, read 12,882,908 times
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I'm on the autistic spectrum and have done the best on Zoloft (or generic Zoloft). Paxil gave me major stomach problems and made me gain 50 pounds, Provac did alright for a while but seemed to wear off after 6 months, I've been on Zoloft for 2.5 years and haven't had any problems with it at all
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:37 AM
 
733 posts, read 1,230,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I'm on the autistic spectrum and have done the best on Zoloft (or generic Zoloft). Paxil gave me major stomach problems and made me gain 50 pounds, Provac did alright for a while but seemed to wear off after 6 months, I've been on Zoloft for 2.5 years and haven't had any problems with it at all
That's interesting....We are thinking of putting my guy on Prozac. He seemed happy on Zoloft for a long time, but when puberty hit, it was like it just wasn't helping...
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Old 01-31-2009, 11:29 AM
 
68 posts, read 322,339 times
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My son *Aspergers & Sensory* was put on everything under the sun since he was 5. I truly believe now that it made his outbursts worse.

He 11 now and off of everything - and though still very "anxious & quirky" at times, his outbursts have become better. Keeping him busy with lots of physical activity helps (with lots of breaks). Also, he's so anxious, he can't sleep at night which made things worse. So he takes Melatonin (natural chemical our body makes to help us fall asleep when its dark) at night.
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Old 01-31-2009, 11:53 PM
 
7 posts, read 37,201 times
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You have to do what is best for EVERYONE in the family. If her behavior is disrupting everyone else then you can;t feel guilty trying some medicines. My daughter had to find the right meds (which is a "painful" thing...some meds make thins worse) but in the end my daughter can now function in a regualr classroom at school. She used to not be able to ride in a car or leave the house due to sensory overload. But now most people think she is a normal girl (with ocassional brat-like fits or unrational thinking). It has saved us our sane-ness. It has helped a ton. There is no wrong or right because every child is different and every familyis different.
But remember to take care of you...if you can't handle it then it will effect everyone in the family.
Good luck. p.s. if your town has a child neurologist I recommend one of them. If not, then go to a child psychiatrist. BUT you still need some therapies, too. (OT, behavioral, etc).
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Old 02-01-2009, 09:59 AM
 
733 posts, read 1,230,026 times
Reputation: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhut View Post
You have to do what is best for EVERYONE in the family. If her behavior is disrupting everyone else then you can;t feel guilty trying some medicines. My daughter had to find the right meds (which is a "painful" thing...some meds make thins worse) but in the end my daughter can now function in a regualr classroom at school. She used to not be able to ride in a car or leave the house due to sensory overload. But now most people think she is a normal girl (with ocassional brat-like fits or unrational thinking). It has saved us our sane-ness. It has helped a ton. There is no wrong or right because every child is different and every familyis different.
But remember to take care of you...if you can't handle it then it will effect everyone in the family.
Good luck. p.s. if your town has a child neurologist I recommend one of them. If not, then go to a child psychiatrist. BUT you still need some therapies, too. (OT, behavioral, etc).
Nice....good post Rep +
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:50 PM
 
1 posts, read 9,826 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoLoveLost View Post
With my one son who got physically aggressive towards others, we put him on Risperidone and he has been doing great. The Risperidone doesn't work for my other son.

We now have him on Strattera. That seems to help him get a bit more focused.
Be careful with the risperdone. My autistic 6 year old son was on it and began having seizure like episodes called oculargyric crisis- from that medicine. It can be permanent too.

the straterra made my son super agressive. we go back friday. i may ask about zoloft...
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