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Old 03-15-2009, 04:25 AM
 
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My 9 yr old has Aspergers?

Any advice out there from other parents?
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Old 03-15-2009, 05:13 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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How was he diagnosed? Do you think it's correct? Did the person who did the assessment give you any input on your options for him?

My son was diagnosed with PDD-NOS a few years ago and we were able to get him wraparound services, speech therapy and other help through different agencies. It took a lot of work on our part but once the services were in gear, it went smoothly.

We started with a case manager through the local base service unit/community mental health facility. She set up most of our services and helped us apply for state funds.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-15-2009, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Chambersburg, PA
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My son was just diagnosed with Asperger's. He is in Kindergarten, and the school has been extremely supportive of him. He was already in speech therapy, and now he spends time about 90 minutes a day in the special Autism room at school, has OT, and an aide with him in his mainstream class. We are in the process of getting more wrap-around services for him, as well as applying for assistance through the Federal and State (PA) governments. Make sure you get a complete IEP from the school for him, and make sure that you stay as involved as you can. My wife stays at home, so she is more involved than I am, but I do what I can to help. Good luck!
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Old 03-15-2009, 11:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackyfrost01 View Post
My 9 yr old has Aspergers?

Any advice out there from other parents?

guess it depends where on the spectrum your child is and what sort of help you think he/she needs.....
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Old 03-16-2009, 03:53 AM
 
1,577 posts, read 3,331,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GJHJ View Post
My son was just diagnosed with Asperger's. He is in Kindergarten, and the school has been extremely supportive of him. He was already in speech therapy, and now he spends time about 90 minutes a day in the special Autism room at school, has OT, and an aide with him in his mainstream class. We are in the process of getting more wrap-around services for him, as well as applying for assistance through the Federal and State (PA) governments. Make sure you get a complete IEP from the school for him, and make sure that you stay as involved as you can. My wife stays at home, so she is more involved than I am, but I do what I can to help. Good luck!
Thanks. What does your wife do to be involved while he's at school? Or is it a half-day program?

Our school district had him at school all day starting 1st grade. At which point I didn't know what do with myself all day. I'd gotten so used to him being with me all day since he was a baby. I still don't. We're together all the time and the Aspergers makes him behave so much younger that its hard not to still treat and talk to him like a little kid at times (I'm working with him on that). So makes letting go of that little kid all the harder, since he's not so little anymore.

I did do the IEP. He's in Special Education for Children with Special Needs classroom at a school here. So there's a 5 hour gap where I'm alone and do the Mr Mom stuff until I get him from school.
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Old 03-16-2009, 06:41 PM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
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Jackyfrost, are you a stay at home dad? My husband is too.

We have 7 year old twin sons in 1st grade that have both been diagnosed with AS. One was diagnosed at the end of kindergarten and the other in the beginning of 1st grade (the one son was having more meltdowns in the class so it was noticed first). We suspect our 5 year old son also has AS and he is currently being evaluated.

This year the twins are in a mainstream, co-taught classroom. There is one regular teacher and one special ed teacher in there, with about 13 students total (mixed of neurotypical and special needs students). Both boys also receive speech therapy and OT. So far they have both made really great progress. Their teachers seem to be really on the ball with methods and such to help the boys cope with AS.

Since we are still sort of new to all of this, we have both been reading and researching whatever we can to learn what we can be doing at home. The teachers and therapists at school have offered us great tips too, to help the boys settle down when they get too frustrated or overloaded. My husband volunteers in their classroom, too. I try to chaperone on field trips as well.
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Old 03-17-2009, 10:54 AM
 
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Jacky,
My son has AS, he's almost 11. We are starting a support group (hubby and myself). Our first meeting is on Saturday. I know you live out of state but if I get any good information from other parents (resources or ideas) I can pass them on to you.

This group, of course, is going to maintain 'confidentiality' and allow people to express themselves but I may get some info to pass on.

We bought our son a book from Amazon recently that explains AS from a kid's perspective:
It's called:Can I Tell You About Asperger Syndrome?: A Guide for Friends and Family, Jude Welton

Google the internet for AS groups near you...what state do you live in?
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Old 03-25-2009, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Chambersburg, PA
71 posts, read 183,176 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackyfrost01 View Post
Thanks. What does your wife do to be involved while he's at school? Or is it a half-day program?

Our school district had him at school all day starting 1st grade. At which point I didn't know what do with myself all day. I'd gotten so used to him being with me all day since he was a baby. I still don't. We're together all the time and the Aspergers makes him behave so much younger that its hard not to still treat and talk to him like a little kid at times (I'm working with him on that). So makes letting go of that little kid all the harder, since he's not so little anymore.

I did do the IEP. He's in Special Education for Children with Special Needs classroom at a school here. So there's a 5 hour gap where I'm alone and do the Mr Mom stuff until I get him from school.
My wife is involved with our 4 year old daughter while our son is in school. She has also taken the lead on researching AS and other ASDs online. We've been blessed with connecting with new friends and reconnecting with old friends on FaceBook who have children with ASDs. They have been a great source of information.

Just this week, our son has gotten a full-time aide in his mainstream classroom. They had 2 different aides, neither with any specific experience as a one-on-one aide, so the new aid is a great thing. I met with her on Monday in the classroom when I was there for all the kindergarten classes for career day, and she seemed very excited to be there. The only concern I had with her was that she didn't have any specific experience dealing with a student with AS, but she did have extensive experience and training dealing with defiance, which is something that she will experience.

Something that you might look into is if your school has the Watch D.O.G.S. program. I am involved with that, and will be at my son's school all day tomorrow.
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Old 05-27-2009, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Savannah, GA
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I am just now accepting the fact that my son probably has A.S. I am trying to get a referral to a neurologist to find out, and he has already seen an Occupational Therapist who thinks he should see a neurologist. He is on our state insurance program, so it is a bit of a pain to get everything approved in a timely manner. He is three years old now and he seems very happy, but his communication skills are obviously problematic. Does anyone have advice for me on how to cope with acceptance? How did you first pick up on your child's A.S.? How did the doctors treat you? Has therapy made a difference? I have so many questions. Thanks.
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Old 05-27-2009, 09:18 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 60,490,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mister.bags View Post
I am just now accepting the fact that my son probably has A.S. I am trying to get a referral to a neurologist to find out, and he has already seen an Occupational Therapist who thinks he should see a neurologist. He is on our state insurance program, so it is a bit of a pain to get everything approved in a timely manner. He is three years old now and he seems very happy, but his communication skills are obviously problematic. Does anyone have advice for me on how to cope with acceptance? How did you first pick up on your child's A.S.? How did the doctors treat you? Has therapy made a difference? I have so many questions. Thanks.
If a child is happy and learning, I don't see a problem. Plenty of kids don't talk until after age 3 and it doesn't cause them any problems later on. Some kids have no need for friends. They're happier in their rooms alone, taking things apart, playing with led lights and batteries for hours. Or they'll get into some kind of plant and obsess over it, read everything they can about just that one kind of plant.

My son had no friends at all before age 15. He didn't want or need them. He wasn't sad, was never a behavior problem except in crowded places or when pushed. His problem in the classroom was he would sit and day dream, saw no need to please a teacher by doing assignments but was never a behavior problem otherwise. He never minded going to school, never got into trouble, teachers said he was likeable, other kids liked him just fine, he was pleasant but always in his own world.

It's best to let them be happy loners rather than push them into social situations that stress them -- they're wired differently but some of it's just a nervous system immaturity, when they're 8 and in a crowd of strangers they might flip out but by age 18, they can handle the stress better. The advantages are that they're not very into peer pressure since they really don't relate to others. They aren't going to want to go to parties and do things just because everyone else is -- they don't care what others do or think.
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