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Old 08-10-2009, 03:19 PM
 
Location: NYC area
3,486 posts, read 5,054,657 times
Reputation: 3848

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
I have a 3 year old. She is very smart and playful. But she throws epic tantrums if a certain TV show is not on. The TV HAS to be on at all times. People tell me not to give in, but she starts throwing things and hitting and screaming. She does this over all kinds of stuff, but the TV she is obessed with. it is impossible to take her out unless she can keep moving or doing something, otherwise she screams and we are forced to leave wherever we are.

She is not potty trained yet, but my 15 month old is already trying to use the potty, so I know it's not me failing at potty training.

She wont let me wash her hair properly, she screams and hits. She has crud on her scalp because I can't get in to scrub and rinse properly. I do as much as I can. but she throws such a fit it makes it so difficult.

She runs off all the time. I am so worred about her when she starts school, I am afraid she will just run off. I don't know how any teacher wil be able to control her.

Does this sound like she might be autisic? by the way, her peditrican isn't much of a help.
Well, if that's all the problems you have, it doesn't sound like she is autistic, but other criteria which perhaps you haven't mentioned may indicate that she is on the spectrum.

*Is her speech proficiency appropriate for her age?
*Did she hit most of her developmental milestones on time?
*Does she make meaningful eye contact? (Eye contact means not simply looking in your direction, but locking into your gaze for at least 5 seconds.)
*Does she show healthy amounts of shared attention? (E.g., if you point at something in the distance, will she follow and look? Will she point something out to you and expect you to look?
*Does she relate emotionally to others? Or does it seem like she can't "read" other people's emotions very well?
*Does she look for approval and attention by, for example, bringing and showing people her toys?
*If other children are around, does she seem aware of their presence?
*Does she seek your approval for doing something you want her to do?
*Does she have problems sleeping through the night?
*Does she often play with toys inappropriately -- by, for example, manipulating only certain small parts as opposed to playing with the whole toy?
*Does she like to line up toys or objects?
*Does she seem to have an unusual amount of interest in geometric patterns?
*Is she very much attached to routine in general? Does it upset her if things aren't done in the exact order the exact same way every day?
*Does she become cranky during transitions, e.g. when you want her to end one activity she enjoys and proceed to another activity that she also enjoys?
*Does she display an unusual sensitivity to certain sounds or textures?
*Does she walk on her toes a lot?
*Is she a fussy eater?

Diagnosing an ASD (that's "autistic spectrum disorder") is not easy, and all autistic children are different. But from a mother to a mother -- if you feel something is wrong, there is a good chance something is. Take your daughter to a pediatric neurologist who works with autistic children and get some answers. Based on what you've said, it might be that your daughter has certain sensory problems which do not amount to autism, but should be addressed anyway. If there is a problem, the earlier you address it, the better. Very young children are remarkably good at overcoming neurological problems, and the window of opportunity is now. And if nothing is wrong, at least you'll have a peace of mind.

Good luck!
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Old 08-11-2009, 09:12 PM
 
Location: North East Pennsylvania
4 posts, read 41,447 times
Reputation: 10
There are a number of studies on treating Autism with a natural form of cysteine. One was at Kosair Children's Hospital and one was in Texas.

Studies till now have shown promise. Not in curing it, but in helping the growth and development with out the challenges autism presents.

Just do a search on autism and glutathione, add cysteine, add bonded whey protein. There are numerous other things it helps with. Do a search on glutathione and disease and you will find numerous diseases that it is associated with helping.

I have been to a couple of seminars on this as a nurse. It is rather interesting. Hope this helps.
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Old 08-13-2009, 12:10 PM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,906 posts, read 36,209,043 times
Reputation: 42502
I agree that you should take your daughter to be evaluated. Her behavior doesn't sound autistic to me. If anything, I would guess there may be a sensory disorder going on.

To give you more info about the spectrum, my daughter has PDD-NOS: pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specificed (meaning she's on the autism spectrum but doesn't meet the criteria for autism, Asperger's, etc.). She has big delays in speech and social development, she flaps her hands and sometimes has facial tics, she spaces out on things that twist or rock (flapping so hard that we're surprised she doesn't take flight). She's not as fixed to a schedule as some ASD kids are, but sometimes she will flip out if something changes--like not going to the library at school because there's an assembly. You know how a really naughty two-year-old might cry and scream and flail and kick if he doesn't get his way? Well, my 11-year-old will do that, too, and she's something like 5'5" and 120 pounds.
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Old 08-15-2009, 10:10 PM
 
2,669 posts, read 4,479,576 times
Reputation: 1558
Check out the book "The Out of Sync Child" It may help you some.
As for the potty training, some kids take longer. DS was 4 when he became potty trained.
There is also a program called Early Childhood Intervention. Contact them and have them help you get in touch with the proper people.
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Old 08-16-2009, 10:46 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 60,490,480 times
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If she believes the television must always be on, does that mean it is always on? Is she ever taught that the television will not be on just because she says it must be?

Does she end up winning every time she throws a fit, does everyone end up catering to her every whim just to keep peace?

She may be learning there are rewards for acting up. When she gets a little bored in a restaurant, she's got total control by having everyone afraid she's going to make a scene.
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Old 08-22-2009, 06:53 AM
 
6,764 posts, read 19,720,756 times
Reputation: 4688
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladybug07 View Post
Check out the book "The Out of Sync Child" It may help you some.
As for the potty training, some kids take longer. DS was 4 when he became potty trained.
There is also a program called Early Childhood Intervention. Contact them and have them help you get in touch with the proper people.
That is an excellent book.
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Old 08-22-2009, 07:13 AM
 
1,592 posts, read 3,082,339 times
Reputation: 1152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cupcake77 View Post
I have a 3 year old. She is very smart and playful. But she throws epic tantrums if a certain TV show is not on. The TV HAS to be on at all times. People tell me not to give in, but she starts throwing things and hitting and screaming. She does this over all kinds of stuff, but the TV she is obessed with. it is impossible to take her out unless she can keep moving or doing something, otherwise she screams and we are forced to leave wherever we are.

She is not potty trained yet, but my 15 month old is already trying to use the potty, so I know it's not me failing at potty training.

She wont let me wash her hair properly, she screams and hits. She has crud on her scalp because I can't get in to scrub and rinse properly. I do as much as I can. but she throws such a fit it makes it so difficult.

She runs off all the time. I am so worred about her when she starts school, I am afraid she will just run off. I don't know how any teacher wil be able to control her.

Does this sound like she might be autisic? by the way, her peditrican isn't much of a help.

A close family relative, who was later diagnosed with Asperger's, was very obsessed with the TV -- in the sense that he would not allow any of his siblings to watch it when he was home. Tantrums were also quite commonplace.

That said, your child is still quite young and could be exhibiting normal behavior associated with being a three year old. For example, could there be a jealousy issue between her and her younger sibling? The fact that they are so close in age can cause intense jealousy on the part of the older sibling. She may be acting out in response to not being the only child in the roost anymore. If so, she needs to be encouraged to get along with her sibling.
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Old 01-18-2010, 01:35 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,910 times
Reputation: 10
Default Smart, but Disruptive

[FONT=Verdana]I interacted with my niece at age 4 for the very first time. She was intelligent, had a large vocabulary, and had great reasoning skills. However, she kept talking loudly, would interrupt someone who was speaking, needed nonstop stimulation, wouldnít listen or obey, cried and fussed when she couldn't get her way, and was a hand full at dinner, arguing with the waitress as to why she couldn't get the balloon before the meal instead of after. After 2 days with her, I was drained. I asked my family, why didn't they tell me that she had special needs before I took her for the weekend so that I could brace myself? They looked at me land said, "What are you talking about?" I thought to myself, Iíve been a school teacher for over 16 years, which is long enough to know that this child ainít right. [/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana]Whatís wrong? I donít know. But, it must be something like Autism, ADD, ADHD, Schizophrenia, Bi-Polar or something? [/FONT][FONT=Verdana]I can only imagine what her teachers must think. There comes a time when it's NOT just a hyper child that will grow out of it or a gifted child that needs extra stimulation. Could you imagine teaching a class where it was 100% nonstop overstimulated and hyperactivies all day? The students who normally conform to the traditional class setting, (teacher lectures, students take notes, etc.) would go out of their minds. There has to be a balance.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana]Anyhow, I'm no doctor or psychologist, but I have taught drug babies, alcoholic babies, kids who couldn't retain information (had no long or short term memory) Autistic children, kids who had gaps in learning, as well as kids who had zero attention span. [/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana][/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana]There should be some kind of test that would determine why a child is smart but so disruptive in class.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana][/FONT]
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Old 01-18-2010, 01:37 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,910 times
Reputation: 10
Default Smart, but Disruptive

[FONT=Verdana]I interacted with my niece at age 4 for the very first time. She was intelligent, had a large vocabulary, and had great reasoning skills. However, she kept talking loudly, would interrupt someone who was speaking, needed nonstop stimulation, wouldnít listen or obey, cried and fussed when she couldn't get her way, and was a hand full at dinner, arguing with the waitress as to why she couldn't get the balloon before the meal instead of after. After 2 days with her, I was drained. I asked my family, why didn't they tell me that she had special needs before I took her for the weekend so that I could brace myself? They looked at me land said, "What are you talking about?" I thought to myself, Iíve been a school teacher for over 16 years, which is long enough to know that this child ainít right.

[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana]Whatís wrong? I donít know. But, it must be something like Autism, ADD, ADHD, Schizophrenia, Bi-Polar or something? [/FONT][FONT=Verdana]I can only imagine what her teachers must think. There comes a time when it's NOT just a hyper child that will grow out of it or a gifted child that needs extra stimulation. Could you imagine teaching a class where it was 100% nonstop over stimulated and hyper active lessons all day? The students who normally conform to the traditional class setting, (teacher lectures, students take notes, etc.) would go out of their minds. There has to be a balance.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana]
Anyhow, I'm no doctor or psychologist, but I have taught drug babies, alcoholic babies, kids who couldn't retain information (had no long or short term memory) Autistic children, kids who had gaps in learning, as well as kids who had zero attention span.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana]
There should be some kind of test that would determine why a child is smart but so disruptive in class.[/FONT]
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