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Old 08-30-2009, 08:29 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,398 posts, read 7,128,975 times
Reputation: 2839

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First, I know absolutely nothing about Down's Syndrome. Second, Im not looking for trouble, I just want to know, and this seems to be the best place to find the information.

There is a guy I work with...we'll call him Mike, that has Downs. His speech is heavily impeded, and he tends to repeat what he says over and over.
He does very little work, and will stand around our registers, arms crossed and relaxed, doing nothing (Absolutely forbidden for the rest of us..we have other people with disabilities working there and they do not do this..he's the only one getting away with it). Often when told by one of our supervisors to go outside and get carts, or that a customer needs help quickly, he'll respond with what translates to be "Yeah yeah yeah" with a very I-dont-care attitude. He gets to be quite disrespectful.

Is it possible for someone with this to be aware that he practically cannot be fired,and to take advantage of it?
Is it possible for someone that's been told they're "Special" all of their life to believe this entitles them to such behavior??

I guess Im trying to "get" this person better, since the other two similar workers do not do this.
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Old 08-30-2009, 09:26 PM
 
3,422 posts, read 9,676,554 times
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I can't answer your question but it does sound like he needs a job coach to work with him at least for a little while to keep an eye on his work habits and to help him cultivate better work habits. If he is employed there through a program then they should be able to provide someone to come. At our local grocery store, the job coach usually bags groceries at the register next to the employee she comes with, so he can work independently but she is right there in case he needs anything.
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Old 08-30-2009, 09:52 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
3,398 posts, read 7,128,975 times
Reputation: 2839
There are people that do that? 0,0
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Old 09-15-2009, 09:52 PM
 
10 posts, read 19,788 times
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Our son have a light form of Downs Syndrome, called mosaic. He can also be very stubborn at times. To tell him "Do this now", has not necessarily always been a good approach. I don't believe that the guy you are working with is taking advantage of his condition. It's probably because of his problem. If possible try to tell him what you need him to do, a little bit ahead of time. Be positive and encouraging. This way maybe you can find a way around his yeah,yeah attitude. A little love can go a long way. Hope this helps
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Old 09-16-2009, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,489 posts, read 41,670,258 times
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It's pretty unlikely that your coworker with Down Syndrome is trying to scam the system. It's also very unlikely than any negative behavior is coming from an entitlement complex.
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Old 09-22-2009, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
263 posts, read 776,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
There are people that do that? 0,0
Yes, there are people who do that. There are job coaches for folks with disabilities. The job coach works no cost to the employer. As the employee gains skills and confidence in the job, the job coach gradually spends less time at the worksite.

How did this young man find his job? Is it possible he already has a job coach?
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Old 10-06-2009, 07:03 PM
 
Location: west of Milwaukee, Wi
105 posts, read 307,377 times
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as someone else already answered:
"Is it possible for someone with this to be aware that he practically cannot be fired,and to take advantage of it?" highly unlikely....

Is it possible for someone that's been told they're "Special" all of their life to believe this entitles them to such behavior?? yes...think of Paris Hilton!
However, I do not think that this young man is one of those people.


If you really want to understand this situation, I would suggest you go to management.
If you approach this correctly, (with a positive/what can I do to help? attitude) perhaps they can offer some insight for you. Better yet, offer to be a 'buddy' to him. A "Buddy" is like a job coach, or a 'big brother/sister' - someone who can be there to 'assist', motivate, and help keep him on task.

Remember, everyone has their own personalities and quirks, strengths and weaknesses.
May I suggest that instead of focusing on his 'faults', try to see, and perhaps help him develop, his strengths.

And most importantly, remember that everyone needs a friend.

Last edited by catfeathers; 10-06-2009 at 07:15 PM..
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Old 10-06-2009, 08:58 PM
 
1,049 posts, read 2,509,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colddiamond102 View Post
Is it possible for someone with this to be aware that he practically cannot be fired,and to take advantage of it?
Is it possible for someone that's been told they're "Special" all of their life to believe this entitles them to such behavior??
Yes and Yes. No point in sugar coating it with responses like "highly unlikely", etc.
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:31 AM
 
Location: west of Milwaukee, Wi
105 posts, read 307,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smooth23 View Post
Yes and Yes. No point in sugar coating it with responses like "highly unlikely", etc.
I am only guessing here, but from your response, you have had limited to no interaction with Down's Syndrome people.

I also don't believe that any answer to these two specific questions is truly going to assist the OP to "Get" this person better". I assumed that phrase meant "Understand",,,but perhaps it meant something else?

No one can truly help the OP as it relates to his co-worker unless it is someone directly involved and knowledgeable about the individual, the work environment, and the expectations.

Last edited by catfeathers; 10-07-2009 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 10-07-2009, 08:38 PM
 
Location: ST paul MN
622 posts, read 1,417,084 times
Reputation: 329
A couch would be good.


but relax depending upon how old he is, he probably wont live beyond 60, rare for people with this handicap if I remember correctly.
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