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Old 04-11-2010, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Baywood Park
1,634 posts, read 6,042,084 times
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My spouse is concerned because our child who is 4, ignores our questions 75% of the time. He prefers playing by himself in a preschool setting, interacts very well with sibling though when playing. Rarely gives direct answers to direct questions, but he'll act like he's doing this purposely and then laughs about it. He told me the other day that reason he doesn't always answer us is because he doesn't feel like talking. He has a ton of facial expressions and it's hard to get him to act serious, he's almost always joking around. We're going to the pediatrician soon to discuss my wife's concerns. It's hard for mr to imagine he has AS. I just think, hope and pray that he's just an eccentric, practical joking, goofy kid. Because that's how he acts.
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Old 04-12-2010, 09:11 AM
 
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That doesn't sound like Asperger's Syndrome.
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Old 04-12-2010, 09:25 AM
 
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I agree that doesn't sound anything like Aspergers.
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Old 04-12-2010, 12:15 PM
 
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For me it was the practical joker that threw me. I didn't reply b/c my DSS is not "typical" on most ASD traits, so I thought maybe some kids were jokesters. In my experience, ASD children are late to develop the social cues needed to be a natural jokester. DSS is 11 and has just started "getting" most jokes. Sarcasm is lost on him.
ASD children tend to think linear, concrete. It does not sound like this describes your son.
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Old 04-12-2010, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Baywood Park
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This first came up when he was two, with his daycare. They mentioned Asperger's. They reason was he would sit at puzzles for an hour or more and be content. He liked playing by himself and wouldn't aknowledge other children and she said he was clumbsy. Concerned, we took him to his pediatrician. He told us that our child was too responsive. His experience with Asperger's lent him to believe he didn't have it.

Now two yrs. later. My wife is watching an episode of Parenthood, the new show on NBC. An actor on that show is portraying a child with Asperger's. She freaks out because on the show he ignores his classmates, just like our son has always done, in daycare and preschool. The kid on the show also sits for a long time just playing lego's, our does the same. She doesn't think most kids are that patient. He also tells stories that don't make sense. His imagination runs wild, she's afraid he's not in reality with us. I don't know, I just think he's kind of eccentric. My wife is scared.
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Old 04-12-2010, 02:24 PM
 
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My son has AS and has a great sense of humor. He's funny and makes lots of puns and jokes. He's great at mimicking people.

Concentrating too much and 'being clumsy' or 'robotic' do not automatically equal AS.

It's not a death sentence. If you are really concerned, have him tested by a psychologist.
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Baywood Park
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Thanks for all the feedback. We plan on getting him tested. Hopefully our pediatrician will have a recommendation as to who to take him to.
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:22 PM
 
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Why do people keep calling Aspergers Syndrome "Asberger Syndrome"?
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enterprise View Post
Why do people keep calling Aspergers Syndrome "Asberger Syndrome"?
because they are unfamilliar with it. When you say it outloud, it can sound like Asberger. No harm, no foul.

To the OP, my son (neurotypical) was one to play on his own in preschool, grade school and beyond. I worked there so I saw the social interactions... and yes he was intraverted that way. Son's thing was playing out (directing) movies with the action figures. He would have epic battles and dramatic action scenes... all in his head. Son was/is comfortable in his own skin and doesn't need the approval of his peers to form his action/opinion. He is now in high school and this is a great trait.

Yes, there are many children who are on the spectrum, but be careful... with the vague symptoms, there are preschool workers, teachers, well meaning people, etc... who see ASD under every tree.
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Old 04-12-2010, 04:38 PM
 
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Sounds more like ADD.
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