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Old 06-10-2010, 10:35 AM
 
1,425 posts, read 3,653,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Not a lot of useful advice, I don't think. It sounds like there's not much she can do if the kid has a disorder that causes her to scream. I don't know if you can afford it, but I would suggest getting a helper to assist you with the children. I suspect even experts can't stop her from screaming.

It might help if you have someone who can give you some room to get some rest from the noise.

Best of luck.
Are you serious or do you actually know nothing about autism?
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Old 06-30-2010, 09:40 PM
 
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As a person with a form of autism, these things work wonder

http://www.weightedblanket.net/

Follow the guidelines for weight, and I think you will be amazed. I don't know how it works, but I figured this out as a child, and I know that it works. Cover the child with the blanket. Compression is really good, but don't constrict the child. I always put a teddy bear or pillow over my ear(s), both for the weight, and for sound reduction. Darkness is another factor. Keep it low. You might try the headphones with calming sounds. They also work for me, especially noise canceling. There are programs for retraining sound sensitivity...I haven't been able to afford them. I'm just betting that the child is overloaded sensorily, as was (and still am) I. Keep the room very cool. Hope this helps.

Last edited by adultautie; 06-30-2010 at 10:28 PM..
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Old 07-02-2010, 11:05 AM
 
2,564 posts, read 1,295,141 times
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What nomore07 says, I suspect the biological (neurological and body chemistry) more than sensory or psychological behavior. The behavior may be a reaction to PAIN. Your child may be in PAIN, possibly even severe PAIN with gastroenteritis , or acid reflux, or celiac disease, or some other form of gut problem (common to Asperger's and autistic children.) One of the symptoms is UNEXPLAINED IRRITABILITY:
Research Autism - Gastro-Intestinal Problems (http://www.researchautism.net/asditem.ikml?print&ra=17&infolevel=4&t=3 - broken link)

Last edited by aspiesmom; 07-02-2010 at 11:17 AM.. Reason: spelling errors ;-)
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Old 07-06-2010, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Middle America
36,624 posts, read 41,896,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockinmomma View Post
Are you serious or do you actually know nothing about autism?
While I agree with your skepticism/disdainful response to the post you were responding to, it's worth mentioning that parents of children with autism DO often need respite. I've worked with families who were greatly helped by the presence of a PCA and/or respite worker in the home even a few hours a week, because a child subject to near-constant tantrums (or near constant aggression, for that matter) can take a tremendous toll on a family. Even though kinkytoes' post is obviously ill-informed in regard to autism, there is something to be said for the suggestion to look into
extra help when a child's tantrums are severe/constant. I've seen so many situations where the neurotypical siblings in the family were left to fend totally for themselves much of the time, while the parents had to attend exclusively to the sibling with severe autism-related tantrums and aggression. Those situations were drastically improved when somebody could come in, even an hour a day, and give the parents a little bit of time to not have to worry about their child with autism and have some time with their other kids.
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Old 08-06-2010, 10:45 AM
 
1,425 posts, read 3,653,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
While I agree with your skepticism/disdainful response to the post you were responding to, it's worth mentioning that parents of children with autism DO often need respite. I've worked with families who were greatly helped by the presence of a PCA and/or respite worker in the home even a few hours a week, because a child subject to near-constant tantrums (or near constant aggression, for that matter) can take a tremendous toll on a family. Even though kinkytoes' post is obviously ill-informed in regard to autism, there is something to be said for the suggestion to look into
extra help when a child's tantrums are severe/constant. I've seen so many situations where the neurotypical siblings in the family were left to fend totally for themselves much of the time, while the parents had to attend exclusively to the sibling with severe autism-related tantrums and aggression. Those situations were drastically improved when somebody could come in, even an hour a day, and give the parents a little bit of time to not have to worry about their child with autism and have some time with their other kids.
I understand your position, and yes, someone coming in to help (even in NT small children) can be a Godsend. I was actually reacting to the part where the poster said there doesn't seem to be anything anyone can do, implying that ASD children who scream are beyond medical and emotional help. This kind of thinking is a 'button' for me, as my DSS's own mother called him "broken" just because he has ASD.
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Old 08-09-2010, 05:09 PM
 
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I know this is a little late writing to you but how about a lap top. Show her to type into it where it show on screen. Check this You tube out. I hope this will help you It is a beginning stage for alot of parents out there.
YouTube - ‪Autistic Girl Expresses Profound Intelligence‬‎ "Mute autistic girl finds a voice"

God bless and good luck
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Old 04-07-2012, 09:13 PM
 
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Dear Mama,
I was searching online tonight to find tips for coping with my sons screaming and found your posts. You know what, I understand and you are not alone. Like me you probably already have your child in alot of therapy and do everything you can to find the reasons for the screaming. With my son we work hard to figure out whats bothering him, but many times you're exhausted, hurting, and mentally going nuts and you know n love them more than anyone yet everyone else replies like you don't know anything and you haven't done anything. At times you do need a solution jyst to get by for something.my son is screaming right now! Its intense and everyday. You people need to give this mom some credit and stop actibg like she doesnt have any experience. No you dont constantly drug your child, but to help then get calm to be able to go to bed sometimes autistic kuds Do need help with melatonin or benadryl. Im sure this mom is doing everything possible. Its HARD living with this,day in day out even if theyre in speech therapy n aba you still go nutz from the screaming n tantrums and need relief. Hang in there mama, that what im doing. Put in earplugs for a while when its intense. My husband had to come home from work today it was so bad. People have no understanding what we go thru everyday. Therapy isnt a fix all! Its a help that is long term. We have to call on God for help n patience to,make it.,bless you today...... Youre probably doing all you can and more...
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Old 04-08-2012, 01:01 PM
 
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Depending upon what is causing the screaming, there are many possibilities

1. Someone suggested a weighted blanket or vest - if the issue is sensory and the child needs deep pressure, this may help.

2. If the issue is sensory, but involves sensitivity to sound, it is possible that noise blocking headphones may help.

3. If the issue is that the child cannot communicate and is frustrated, an Ipad with a communication app can be very helpful - a good speech therapist can work with the child using any communication device that helps them. The Ipad is one of the best, imo, but there are others as well.

4. If the issue is pain from reflux, a gastroenterologist may need to be consulted. The child's diet may need to be changed or they may need meds for a medical issue.

5. If the issue is that the child has trouble with transitions, a visual timer or some other way of making the transitions better for them might help. A visual schedule to help them see what is going to happen next can be invaluable.

The screaming may be caused by one or more of the above, so it is important to figure out the patterns. A functional behavioral analysis can look at the behavior and find the triggers for it. Then a behavior plan may help as well.
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Old 04-08-2012, 03:09 PM
 
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When I saw this post (I realized it is old) but I was reading the responses and two of the suggestions I had, were already said. The weighted vest and weighted blanket. Those helped my son in school. I also would carry a bag of different items with me. Some of the things it included were a stress ball, a brush with soft bristles (like the plastic ones they sometimes give at school at picture day), not sure what they are exactly called but they have liquid in them, they are tubular and you squeeze them and they move (I know I am not explaining that well but maybe you will get the idea), just all sorts of things like that. Sometimes the textures of things really help but sometimes it doesn't matter what you try, nothing seems to help. Like with the brush, either they can squeeze it, just touch/feel it or you could softly rub it up and down their arm. May take the focus off them having a melt down (that is what we call fits). Sometimes when he was having a really bad one, I would just hug him, a really big hug. But that doesn't always work. If he had an issue in school he knew he could always call me. When he called we would "blow out candles" together. I would say something like...lets blow out our candles...okay here is the first one and we would both blow...sometimes if it is caught early before it gets really bad you might be about to avoid the melt down. It might take to the 5th candle but sometimes that works. (we also did the "candles blowing out" at home) Not all children with Autism/Asperger's Syndrome respond to the same things.

The idea about the headphones is really good idea. I don't think they had the noise cancellation headphones when mine was small. I would have tried that if there had been something like that. Not really sure that would have worked for him but I am sure it could work for many. The diet, would not work for my son. There are so very few things he eats anyway.
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Old 04-13-2012, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
17,028 posts, read 17,342,168 times
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Nana053 stated:
Depending upon what is causing the screaming, there are many possibilities

1. Someone suggested a weighted blanket or vest - if the issue is sensory and the child needs deep pressure, this may help.

2. If the issue is sensory, but involves sensitivity to sound, it is possible that noise blocking headphones may help.

3. If the issue is that the child cannot communicate and is frustrated, an Ipad with a communication app can be very helpful - a good speech therapist can work with the child using any communication device that helps them. The Ipad is one of the best, imo, but there are others as well.

4. If the issue is pain from reflux, a gastroenterologist may need to be consulted. The child's diet may need to be changed or they may need meds for a medical issue.

5. If the issue is that the child has trouble with transitions, a visual timer or some other way of making the transitions better for them might help. A visual schedule to help them see what is going to happen next can be invaluable.

The screaming may be caused by one or more of the above, so it is important to figure out the patterns. A functional behavioral analysis can look at the behavior and find the triggers for it. Then a behavior plan may help as well.


Wow! Thank you, your response was very detailed and informative. I hope that parents will try your suggestions.

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