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Old 06-16-2010, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,336,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I'm sure the insurance companies will be thrilled when the government finally decrees there is "nothing wrong" with all your little Aspies.

They won't have to cover it. Nor will Social Security Disability. And the workplaces will no longer have to worry about reasonable accommodation.

As for me, I find it hard enough to get through this world without a diagnosis at all. But to find out that I have Aspergers and no one will help me do anything about it because it means there's "nothing wrong" with me..would be frightening.
Just ftr, most with Asperger's don't get social security, and insurance companies frequently don't cover autism-related therapies anyway (the rationale being that they don't spend for incurable conditions, though I will note that they do cover therapies related to schizophrenia, AIDS, asthma, and herpes).
And none of the adult Aspies I know are "out" at work. Though there is a running joke that NASA is just one big sheltered workshop...

You seem to assume that, because many of us refuse to pity and patronize our "Aspergian" friends and relatives-- and in some cases, ourselves-- that we're letting them flounder without supports. IME, nothing could be farther from the truth. To be treated as if you're incompetent and incomplete is the real handicapping condition.
As with her neurotypical siblings, my daughter needs to be taught self-discipline, social mores, and coping skills. That her coping skills deal with being mildly faceblind and relentlessly detail-oriented rather than being tone-deaf or left-handed like some other family member doesn't make her "broken". (Certainly the fact that she's profoundly gifted-- which is often related to ASDs-- and is bound for college before she's old enough to shave her legs or drive doesn't, either.)
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Old 06-16-2010, 12:49 PM
 
1,425 posts, read 3,655,895 times
Reputation: 2035
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
I'm sure the insurance companies will be thrilled when the government finally decrees there is "nothing wrong" with all your little Aspies.

They won't have to cover it. Nor will Social Security Disability. And the workplaces will no longer have to worry about reasonable accommodation.

As for me, I find it hard enough to get through this world without a diagnosis at all. But to find out that I have Aspergers and no one will help me do anything about it because it means there's "nothing wrong" with me..would be frightening.
My boy doesn't receive anything from insurance (other than normal health care) nor the government (other than what any neurotypical child is entitled to... education, being the first thing that pops into my head). There is no reason for it. He is perfectly healthy and not disabled.

What accommodations should a workplace offer?

When I state there is "nothing wrong" with my son, I am not saying he is neurotypical. I am saying there is nothing wrong with the person he is. He is still loving, charming, smart, witty, funny and a joy to be around. He just processes thought differently. For people who have a problem with him, it is their problem, not his.

Yes, some ASD people have more difficulty than my son. For those people, services should be available. But just because you have a diagnosis on the spectrum doesn't mean you are incapable of living a productive, loving, whatever neurotypical people have life.

I am not saying overcoming obstacles is easy. But in life we all have obstacles to overcome. For some it is poverty, others may have poor upbringing, some it could be a too privileged upbringing. ASD is just an obstacle some children need to be taught how to overcome. And it can be taught to most. I am not going to make a blanket statement about ASD because there are so many variables.
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Old 06-16-2010, 12:53 PM
 
1,425 posts, read 3,655,895 times
Reputation: 2035
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Originally Posted by Aconite View Post

We can call it Mary-Richards Syndrome, NOS.
Ohhh my!!!, I think it may be meeeeeee
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